His Excellency the Governor, together with his Majesty’s Council, having had under mature Consideration, the necessary and most expedient Measures for carrying into Execution those Parts of his Majesty’s Commission and Instructions which relate to the Calling of General Assemblies within the Province, came to the following Resolutions thereon, Viz. That a House of Representatives of the Inhabitants of this Province, be the Civil Legislature thereof, in Conjunction with his Majesty’s Governor or Commander in Chief for the Time being, and his Majesty’s Council of the said Province. The first House to be elected and convened in the following Manner, …

Proclamation, Province of Nova Scotia council chamber, Halifax, January 3rd, 1757 More…

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“When, in 1750, La Loutre, the missionary priest, organized the raid on the little settlement at Dartmouth, the village at the Crossing Place saw the gathering of the tribes, and may also have seen the bloody trophies which the Indians carried on their return. An English officer and his men visited Hebert in 1754: We forded the Shubenacadie where the Stewiacke or Torbay river falls into it to a village called Pierre Hebert. This is a fine settlement, has a vast quantity of the best marshlands belonging to it …. We came so suddenly upon the inhabitants that they had …

History in a Valley More…

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Part of the Town & Harbour of Halifax in Nova Scotia, Looking down George Street to the Opposite Shore Called Dartmouth (1759, Mason, James, 1710-c.1783) https://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/detail.jsp?Entt=RDMDC-X76-19&R=DC-X76-19&fbclid=IwAR0B4V19DVaVrbvjG7fa8qju9RMnRUvauOvrHv3YrQUV8L8K15KEZw_-Tps One distinct record from the year of 1759 survives:“Mrs. Mary Clark, whose house and garden stood at the southeast corner of the present Portland and King Streets, advised Secretary Richard Bulkeley that her “three lots have been improved, cleared and fenced-in twice but all the improvements, fences, etc., have been taken away and burnt by the Army and Navy”.

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: This sketch shows part of Admiral Saunders’ fleet on which General Wolfe sailed for the siege of Quebec. Many of these warships came here first from England, then sailed in a convoy to the St. Lawrence River via Louisbourg. Men on fatigue duty are carrying firewood down a slope. At least there are large boulders still on the beach. Tree stumps in the foreground indicate, even in those years, the timberland of that section was a convenient source of supply for vessels anchored along this side of the harbor, where …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: The year 1759 brought more activity to Dartmouth with the arrival of the large fleet bound for Quebec. Drawings such as these, were sketched for the eyes of London officialdom to see just how British Government money was being spent hereabouts. Hence in order to emphasize the Blockhouse, the Sawmill and the military roads of Dartmouth, the artist had to leave out trees and houses, and even move the ships nearer to Halifax. Both in 1758 and in 1759, sheltered Mill Cove must have been used to moor war transports, …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: The first Nova Scotia election was held in 1758*. In that year, inhabitants of the various settlements went to the polls and named representatives to the first House of Assembly at Halifax. It has met regularly ever since. Previously, the laws had been made by a Governor and his chosen Councils Most of those early Councillors obtained extensive grants of land in Dartmouth township. This partiality seems to have aroused criticism, especially among Halifax settlers who had come up from New England. One of the latter, writing to a Boston …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: From Volume I of Knox History Journal we learned by a perusal of the diary of Major Robert Rogers that his famous Rogers’ Rangers were quartered at Dartmouth for a time during the 7-Years’ War. According to the record they had been stationed at Fort William Henry, and proceeded from there to the port of New York: June 1757—. . . sailed with 100 vessels bound to Halifax, where we soon arrived and according to orders, I encamped on the Dartmouth side of the harbour. . . . The Rangers …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Initially there were about 30 men at the Eastern Battery at Imperoyal, but in the autumn of 1755, military records tell us that a considerable number of soldiers spent the winter on this side of the water. These were none other than the troops of Colonel John Winslow, who had just returned from their job of expelling the Acadians. Winslow’s diary of November 1755 says that “My 54 non-commissioned officers and privates are at Dartmouth”. In the same records is a memo signed by Henry Dobson stating that Lieut. Billings and Ensign …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: During 1754, gangs of soldiers are busily engaged cutting a road from Dartmouth to the new settlement at Lawrencetown. (This is probably the beginnings of Old Ferry Road from Parker’s wharf over the Cameron Street hill to Cole Harbor, by a route which no doubt avoided the outlet at Maynard’s Lake.) Of all the fortifications built to protect the harbor of Halifax in early times, one of the first was constructed a$ the Eastern Battery, mentioned on page 11 .Engineer John Brewse was in charge, and he had seven heavy …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: More local activity is inferred from a Halifax newspaper of January 1753 which informs us that Mr. G. Gerrish, blacksmith, has finished a crank for a new sawmill erecting at Dartmouth, which weighs nearly 17 cwt. The mill to go by wind and to carry 18 saws.

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Furnished in the minutes of Cornwallis’ Council for February 3, 1752, is when John Connor was given exclusive rights to operate a ferry service. The preamble points out that great inconvenience attends the inhabitants of Halifax and Dartmouth for want of a constant ferryboat. Henry Wynne of Halifax, and William Manthorne of Block “B”, lot no. 4, took over the service the following December. There were 53 families with a total population of 193 within the town of Dartmouth, according to statistics of 1752. (This might possibly include the township). …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: According to Harry Piers’ pamphlet on early blockhouses, the timber for the one at Dartmouth was prepared in Halifax. Governor Cornwallis employed French inhabitants squaring logs for that purpose during the winter of 1749-1750. The first mention of ours, is on February 23, 1751, when the Governor orders a “Sergeant and ten or twelve men of the military of Dartmouth, should mount guard at night in the blockhouse, and that they should be visited from time to time by the lieutenant”. But the blockhouse evidently did not afford much protection …

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After the Treaty of Utrecht, the first recorded proposal for a settlement on the Dartmouth side from British officials originated with Captain Thomas Coram of London in 1718. One of the districts selected for establishing colonists was “northeast of the harbor of Chebucto”. Massachusetts influence opposed this plan as being detrimental to their fisheries. When Hon. Edward Cornwallis set out to settle Halifax in 1749, he carried a complete plan of the harbor, the Basin and the surrounding shores, which had been previously surveyed by British Admiral Durell. The latter’s information about useful places on the eastern side must have …

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