A (probably very) rough translation: “The English took possession of Chibouctou on the 19th of August 1749 and named it Halifax. It is one of the most beautiful ports in all parts of Acadia and England. It should provide great income, by the different advantages that it contains. It is located at 44 degrees 3 minutes latitude.” This map is an inset from a broader map of Nova Scotia (Acadia), interestingly it shows the picketed part of Dartmouth as being near the bottom of what would be Old Ferry Road today, it appears the Eastern battery is seen closer to Eastern Passage. “Carte réduite des costes de l’Acadie” 17?? (>1749) https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b53089777g

More time is spent describing Dartmouth here than in many other similar books of its kind, yet another instance of 1756 being given as the date of Dartmouth’s “destruction” at the hands of the Mi’kmaq. The timing of the “attack”, 1756, in regards to the delay of the institution of representative government at Halifax until 1758; the requirement of a population of 25 qualified electors in 1757 in order to qualify for a representative in the legislature, which become 50 qualified electors by 1758; all these points, when put together, have always struck me as curious. Earlier events, such as the arrival and settlement of various “wastrels” as well as the “King’s bad bargains” has led me to question whether it was the Mi’kmaq who were involved in …

A Plan of National Colonization Read More…

DARTMOUTH, Halifax County: This city is located on the east side of Halifax Harbour. A [Mi’kmaq] name was Boonamoogwaddy, “Tomcod ground.” The English name may have been given in honor of William Legge, Earl of Dartmouth, Colonial Secretary 1772-75, but it was probably named for the Devonshire port of Dartmouth. In August, 1750, the Alderney arrived in Halifax (Chebucto) Harbour with 353 settlers on board. On August 23 the Council resolved to settle them across the Harbour from Halifax. Before the end of 1750, a blockhouse and small military post had been built. In 1751 the settlers suffered from an [Indigenous] attack. After the American Revolution an oil factory was set up and operated by a Nantucket Whaling Company about 1785 to 1792. They built a meeting-house about …

Place Names and Places of Nova Scotia (in Dartmouth Township) Read More…

“Prisons played a role in the system almost from the founding of Halifax. According to contemporary accounts the first British settlers in the town included numerous ‘vagabonds’ and assorted criminals. These were the remnants of the three thousand discharged soldiers and sailors, ‘the King’s bad bargains,’ introduced to the colony by Governor Cornwallis in 1749. An influx of former indentured servants from Newfoundland and Virginia, whom some officials viewed as wastrels, helped swell the towns population to about five thousand in 1755. (Executive council minutes, 22 Dec. 1752, PANS RG1, vol. 186,276, and 27 June 1754, vol. 187, 77-9; W.S. MacNutt “The Atlantic Provinces: The Emergence of Colonail Society” [Toronto: McClelland and Stewart 1965] 53-4; T.H. Raddall “Halifax: Warden of the North” rev. ed. [Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, …

From Bridewell to Federal Penitentiary: Prisons and Punishment in Nova Scotia before 1880 Read More…

“F: Village Dartmouth ou monte un bivac de 60 homes “Bivac“: “Term borrowed from German. Extraordinary guard which is made at night in the open air for the safety of a camp, a detachment, a post. Sleep at the bivac.” Rough translation: Dartmouth village, a camp made up of 60 men. “Plan de la baye et des ports de Chibouctou” 1751. https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b53089566v

“List of Contributors: … P. McNab, Dartmouth – barley and oats.” “On the east side of the harbor is situated the town of Dartmouth, settled in 1750. The town is well situated, and is admirably adapted to the employment of ship-building. It is connected with the city by steamboats.” “Prior to 1719 (at which time Annapolis was the seat of government) the management of the civil affairs of the province was vested solely in the Governor; and, in his absence, in the Lieutenant-Governor or the Commander-in-Chief. In 1719, Governor Phillips, who succeeded Mr. Nicholson, received instructions from the British Ministry to choose a Council from amongst the principal English inhabitants, and, until an Assembly could be formed, to regulate himself by the instructions of the Governor of Virginia. …

Nova Scotia in 1862: papers relating to the two great exhibitions in London of that year Read More…

“The [Indigenous people] had appeared in the neighborhood of the town for several weeks, but intelligence had been received that they had commenced hostilities, by the capture of twenty persons at Canso… On the last day of September they made an attack on the sawmill at Dartmouth, then under the charge of Major Gilman. Six of his men had been sent out to cut wood without arms. The [Indigenous people] laid in ambush, killed four and carried off one, and the other escaped and gave the alarm, and a detachment of rangers was sent after the [Indigenous people], who having overtaken them, cut off the heads of two [Indigenous people] and scalped one. (This affair is mentioned in a letter from a gentleman in Halifax to Boston, dated …

History of Halifax City Read More…

“Manuscript map copy by Samuel Holland showing the coasts around Halifax, to Lunenburg Harbour, and from Minas Basin to Forts Cumberland and Lawrence on the Bay of Fundy. Also shows the road from Fort Sackvile to Pisiguit Fort and the old Acadian villages around Bedford Bay” Holland, Samuel. “Map of that part of Nova Scotia contained between Lunenburgh and the Bay Vert by Halifax and Pisiguit, including Cobiguit and Tatmagouch” 1755. https://hdl.huntington.org/digital/collection/p15150coll4/id/16150

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