“F: Village Dartmouth ou monte un bivac de 60 homes “Bivac“: “Term borrowed from German. Extraordinary guard which is made at night in the open air for the safety of a camp, a detachment, a post. Sleep at the bivac.” My rough translation: Dartmouth village, a camp made up of 60 men. “Plan de la baye et des ports de Chibouctou” 1751. https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b53089566v

“List of Contributors: … P. McNab, Dartmouth – barley and oats.” “On the east side of the harbor is situated the town of Dartmouth, settled in 1750. The town is well situated, and is admirably adapted to the employment of ship-building. It is connected with the city by steamboats.” “Prior to 1719 (at which time Annapolis was the seat of government) the management of the civil affairs of the province was vested solely in the Governor; and, in his absence, in the Lieutenant-Governor or the Commander-in-Chief. In 1719, Governor Phillips, who succeeded Mr. Nicholson, received instructions from the British Ministry to choose a Council from amongst the principal English inhabitants, and, until an Assembly could be formed, to regulate himself by the instructions of the Governor of Virginia. This Council was composed of twelve members, principally officers of the garrison and the public departments. The Governor and Council, from the …

Nova Scotia in 1862: papers relating to the two great exhibitions in London of that year Read More…

“The [Indigenous people] had appeared in the neighborhood of the town for several weeks, but intelligence had been received that they had commenced hostilities, by the capture of twenty persons at Canso… On the last day of September they made an attack on the sawmill at Dartmouth, then under the charge of Major Gilman. Six of his men had been sent out to cut wood without arms. The [Indigenous people] laid in ambush, killed four and carried off one, and the other escaped and gave the alarm, and a detachment of rangers was sent after the [Indigenous people], who having overtaken them, cut off the heads of two [Indigenous people] and scalped one. (This affair is mentioned in a letter from a gentleman in Halifax to Boston, dated October 2nd as follows: “About seven o’clock on Saturday morning before, as several of Major Gilman’s workmen with one soldier, unarmed, were …

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“Manuscript map copy by Samuel Holland showing the coasts around Halifax, to Lunenburg Harbour, and from Minas Basin to Forts Cumberland and Lawrence on the Bay of Fundy. Also shows the road from Fort Sackvile to Pisiguit Fort and the old Acadian villages around Bedford Bay” Holland, Samuel. “Map of that part of Nova Scotia contained between Lunenburgh and the Bay Vert by Halifax and Pisiguit, including Cobiguit and Tatmagouch” 1755. https://hdl.huntington.org/digital/collection/p15150coll4/id/16150

“Rhode Islanders emigrating to Nova Scotia? How is that? .. Ah Yes! They must have been a group of Tories… No! The colony of which I speak left the parent stock when all were alike loyal to the sovereign of Great Britain ,- indeed at just the juncture when it was the proudest boast of every New Englander that he was a British subject. Jan. 11, 1759, Governor Lawrence sent forth from the Council Chamber at Halifax, a second proclamation: “The significance of this document in one respect must have struck the attention of all who are Rhode Islanders in spirit; refer to its lofty sentiments with regard to liberty of conscience.” Huling, Ray Greene, 1847-1915. The Rhode Island Emigration to Nova Scotia. [Providence, R.I.?: s.n., 1889. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/aeu.ark:/13960/t3nv9vv03

Society Of Anti-Gallicans, William Herbert, and Robert Sayer. A new and accurate map of the English empire in North America; Representing their rightful claim as confirmed by charters and the formal surrender of their Indian friends; likewise the encroachments of the French, with the several forts they have unjustly erected therein. London, Sold by Wm. Herbert, 1755. Map. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/74696120/>

“The beauty and the safety of this (Halifax) harbor attracted the notice of speculators at a very early period, and many applications were at different times made, for a grant of land in its vicinity. The famous projector, Captain Coram, was engaged in 1718, in a scheme for settling here; and a petition was presented by Sir Alexander Cairn, James Douglas, and Joshua Gee, in behalf of themselves and others, praying for a grant upon the sea coast, five leagues S.W. and five leagues N.W. of Chebucto, upon condition of building a town, improving the country around it, be raising hemp, making pitch, tar and turpentine, and of settling two hundred families upon it within three years. This petition received a favorable report from the Lords of Trade; but as it was opposed by the Massachusetts’s agents, on account of a clause restricting the fishery, it was rejected by the …

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“Township of Dartmouth Opposite the Town of Halifax, the Town called Dartmouth was laid out in the Year 1749; but in the war of 1756, the [Indigenous people] collected in great force on the basin of Minas, ascended the Shubenacadie in their canoes, and in the night surprised the guard, and killed, scalped, or carried away the most of the settlers; from which period the settlement went to decline, and was almost derelict until the year 1784, when a number of families were encouraged to settle there from Nantucket, to carry on the whale fishery. The town was then laid out in a new form, and cultivation and business revived with spirit and activity, and very encouraging expectations were formed of success in the whale fishery by all concerned in it, until these enterprising people were persuaded, by liberal encouragement, to quit this Country, and remove to Whitehaven in England, …

Instructions under the direction of the Secretary of State for the Colonial Department Read More…

For a few years the government of Nova Scotia was vested solely in a governor, who had command of the garrison stationed at the fort of Annapolis, known as Port Royal in the days of the French regime. In 1719 a commission was issued to Governor Phillips, who was authorized to appoint a council of not less than twelve persons, all of whom held office during pleasure. The governor, in his instructions, was ordered neither to augment nor diminish the number of the said council, nor suspend any of the members thereof, without good and sufficient cause… This council had advisory and judicial functions, but its legislative authority was of a very limited scope. Consequently the year 1758 is the commencement of a new epoch in the constitutional history of Nova Scotia. We find then from that time a civil government duly organized as in other English colonies of America, …

The Constitution of the Legislative Council of Nova Scotia Read More…

“Dartmouth, on the opposite side of the safe and spacious harbour, offered an inviting appearance for the formation of a village, and in one year after the foundation of Halifax, some of the company of Lord Cornwallis passed over and commenced a settlement. But a sad catastrophe befell the little town: in six years from its beginning it was destroyed by [Indigenous people], who made an irruption upon it from the forest in its rear, destroying with merciless cruelty the inhabitants, demolishing the houses and laying waste the newly tilled lands.” “Dartmouth was laid even with the ground” Hill, George W. “Nova Scotia and Nova Scotians” [Halifax, N.S.? : s.n.], 1858 (Halifax, N.S. : J. Bowes) https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.22739/1?r=0&s=1

“Dartmouth was founded-in 1750, but in 1756 it was destroyed by the [Indigenous people]. In 1784 it was again settled by emigrants from Nantucket, most of whom removed in 1798. Since that time its population has gradually increased. The townships of this county-are Halifax, Dartmouth, Laurencetown (sic) and Preston. The first of these has two representatives in the Assembly.” Dawson, J.W. “A hand book of the geography and natural history of the province of Nova Scotia” Pictou [N.S.] : J. Dawson, 1848. https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.37346/34?r=0&s=1

“Mr. George Gerrish of this Town Blacksmith, last week finished a Crank for the new Saw-Mill erecting at Dartmouth, which weighs near Seventeen Hundred Weight, and is esteem’d as well made as any in Holland; the Mill is to go by Wind, and to carry eighteen Saws.” The Halifax Gazette – Jan 27, 1753, https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=4p3FJGzxjgAC&dat=17530127&printsec=frontpage&hl=en

“Dartmouth, which was settled in the year after the founding of Halifax, suffered most from the [Indigenous people]. Six men belonging to this place were attacked whilst cutting wood in the forest; four of them were killed and scalped, and one was taken prisoner. A few months afterwards, the [Indigenous people], having crept upon the settlement during the night, killed and scalped several of the panic stricken inhabitants. The screams of the terrified women and children were heard across the harbour in Halifax. The governor and council, unwisely adopting the barbarous custom of the [Indigenous people], offered large rewards for [Indigenous] prisoners and [Indigenous] scalps.” “Dartmouth (4300) is about a mile from Halifax, on the opposite side of the harbour. It has various manufactures, among them are hempen rope and skates of superior quality. Near the town is the Provincial Lunatic Asylum.” Calkin, John B. “A history and geography of …

A history and geography of Nova Scotia Read More…

“In November and December of the year 1750 the following officers were appointed to the Dartmouth militia… Robert Campbell, to be Captain Jos. Scott, Thos. Burke, Thos. Leake, Josiah Rogerson, to be Lieutenants” Edwards, Joseph Plimsoll. “The militia of Nova Scotia, 1749-1867”, 1911 https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.78682/1?r=0&s=1

Duc d’Anville arrived at Chebucto, 10 Sept 1746 Halifax founded, 21 June 1749 [Indigenous people] attacked 6 men at Maj. Gilman’s saw-mill, Dartmouth Cove, killing 4, 30 Sept 1749 Saw-mill let to Capt. Wm. Clapham, 1750 Alderney arrived from Europe with 353 settlers, Aug. 1750 Town of Dartmouth laid out for the Alderney emigrants, Autumn 1750 Order issued relative to guard at Dartmouth, 31 Dec. 1750 Sergeant and 10 or 12 men ordered to mount guard during the nights at the Blockhouse, Dartmouth, 23 Feb. 1751 [Indigenous people] attacked Dartmouth, killing a number of the inhabitants, 13 May, 1751 German emigrants arrived at Halifax and were employed in picketing the back of Dartmouth, July 1751 Ferry established between Dartmouth and Halifax, John Connor, ferryman, 3 Feb. 1752 Mill at Dartmouth sold to Maj. Ezekiel Gilman, June 1752 Population of Dartmouth 193, or 53 families, July 1752 Advertisement ordered for the …

Chronological Table of Dartmouth, Preston, and Lawrencetown Read More…

“A list of the families in part of Nova Scotia, dated Halifax, July, 1752, states that there were within the town of Dartmouth: 53 families, 81 males above sixteen, 47 females above 16, 29 males under 16, 38 females under 16; total 193.” (Selections from the Public Documents of N.S., p 670)