“…it is of importance that the people of this country should be free from danger. For, sir, without professing a prophetic spirit, let me say that if the principles I am now contending for be not distinctly acknowledged, the time will come when Governors will attempt to exercise the power they now nominally possess, and place themselves in opposition to the wishes of the people.” Johnston, J. W. “Speech delivered by the Hon. J.W. Johnston, in the House of Assembly, on the 19th March, 1850 : on introducing resolutions for defining the nature and foundation of the self-government of Nova …

Resolutions for defining the nature and foundation of the self-government of Nova Scotia in her local affairs, and in favor of an elective legislative council More…

“Dartmouth, on the opposite side of the safe and spacious harbour, offered an inviting appearance for the formation of a village, and in one year after the foundation of Halifax, some of the company of Lord Cornwallis passed over and commenced a settlement. But a sad catastrophe befell the little town: in six years from its beginning it was destroyed by [Indigenous people], who made an irruption upon it from the forest in its rear, destroying with merciless cruelty the inhabitants, demolishing the houses and laying waste the newly tilled lands.” “Dartmouth was laid even with the ground” Hill, George …

Nova Scotia and Nova Scotians More…

“It is a delicate subject to contrast the rapid advance of civilization with the lingering tinge of despotism, still hovering over the whole, and, by the irresistible chains of self interest, aiding the reinstation of that opacity, from which it has so lately emerged.” “This one thing is certain, it must be a strong, singular, and extraordinary event which will draw a woman of Nova Scotia sufficiently forward to even give an opinion undeservedly, still less to undertake the responsibility of influencing others. Perhaps if it were not so, this country might, ere this, have attained a higher position; for …

Secret inquisitions, or, Nova Scotia as it was, is, and may be More…

“There is not a finished canal in Nova Scotia, but there are two now in course of construction. As early as 1825, operations were commenced for connecting the harbour of Halifax with Cobequid Bay, by means of the waters of the Shubenacadie River, the Dartmouth Lakes, and the “Shubenecadie Canal.” Hamilton, Pierce Stevens. “Nova-Scotia considered as a field for emigration” London : J. Weale, 1858. https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.44945/6?r=0&s=1

Duc d’Anville arrived at Chebucto, 10 Sept 1746 Halifax founded, 21 June 1749 [Indigenous people] attacked 6 men at Maj. Gilman’s saw-mill, Dartmouth Cove, killing 4, 30 Sept 1749 Saw-mill let to Capt. Wm. Clapham, 1750 Alderney arrived from Europe with 353 settlers, Aug. 1750 Town of Dartmouth laid out for the Alderney emigrants, Autumn 1750 Order issued relative to guard at Dartmouth, 31 Dec. 1750 Sergeant and 10 or 12 men ordered to mount guard during the nights at the Blockhouse, Dartmouth, 23 Feb. 1751 [Indigenous people] attacked Dartmouth, killing a number of the inhabitants, 13 May, 1751 German …

Chronological Table of Dartmouth, Preston, and Lawrencetown More…

“Disaster is frequently the parent of legislation. In surveying the long history of Nova Scotia, we find this saying particularly true.” “The first recorded instance of illness in Nova Scotia is the account of Champlain of an outbreak of scurvy at Port Royal in 1606. His group of settlers had spent the winter of 1605 at St. Croix Island, where, of a group of seventy-nine, forty-four died of scurvy. In Port Royal in the following year twelve of forty-five died.” “Of all the epidemics, that of smallpox carried with it the greatest destruction and terror. In 1694 an epidemic was …

The Development of Public Health in Nova Scotia More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: In 1858 a pipe line was laid from Maynard’s Lake to convey water to Mount Hope Asylum. Houses recently erected along the route like Beech wood, Sunnyside and Maplehurst were also connected, and thus their occupants enjoyed the convenience of a modern water supply some 30 years before downtown houses.

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: Hon. J. W. Johnston, who had been at the head of the Nova Scotia Government in the previous decade, again became Premier of the Province in February 1857 when the Liberals were defeated on a want of confidence vote in the Assembly. (See Calkin’s History.) One of the ablest of the Conservative members was Dr. Charles Tupper of Cumberland, who was residing that winter with Dr. Parker at “Beechwood” not far from Mr. Johnston’s home at “Mount Amelia.” In his reminiscences published long afterwards, Sir Charles Tupper tells us that it …

1857 More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: The summer of 1851 another meeting of the Dartmouth Water Company was held, and plans discussed for laying pipes from the lake. A Committee was appointed to solicit subscriptions to the fund already on hand, so that the work might soon be undertaken. Two new vessels were completed. From Chappell’s the 300-ton barque “Coringa” was launched and the brig “Express” of 143 tons went off from Lyle’s yard.

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: At the beginning of the year 1850 Charles W. Fairbanks made a long report to the Legislature on the state of the Shubenacadie Canal. He proposed abandoning the two double-locks near Foster’s bridge in Dartmouth and the damaged locks at Porto Bello. At both these places, inclined planes (page 39) were to be installed. On a rainy night in May, the Steam Mill of H. Y. Mott and Son near Woodside was completely destroyed by fire. Large stocks of chocolate, cocoa, spices and other goods were consumed by flames. Harbor regattas …

1850 More…