The Mayor’s Report Citizens of Dartmouth, Ladies and Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit my report as Mayor of the year 1951. The year just closed marked another year of progress for Dartmouth, one in which the official census figures showed a population in excess of 15,000, an increase of 40 percent over the 1941 census. During the year 1951 we marked the completion of our new Junior High School, which is widely acclaimed as the most modern in its field, and also observed the official opening of the Dartmouth Memorial Rink. Both of these were in. operation during the year and are filling a long-felt need in the Town. An addition to Notting Park Elementary school was also started late in the year. Good progress was made in the special water project involving the construction of a reservoir outside the Town. Further progress was also made in the …

Annual Report 1951 Read More…

Citizens of Dartmouth, Ladies and Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit my report and comments on the civic events of 1952. Dartmouth continued to march forward during 1952 but it is difficult to single out any particular event as the main highlight of the year. We saw the completion and taking over of the new additions to the water system, i. e., new pump house, reservoir and new water main which were finished within the original estimate of $700,000. The benefits in an improved water system were immediately evident and there was an early reduction in insurance rates of 17% which is worth many dollars to Dartmouth citizens. Taxable Assessments rose to $20,965,395, as a result of the reassessment survey, making possible a reduction in the Tax rate from $4.40 to $2.58. It is evident that a rate of $5.00 would have been necessary under the old system of …

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A broader aerial picture with enough developments happening to date it with some level of certainty. The Bridge is present, the Avenue is undisturbed, Crichton Park is in the process of construction. Maynard’s Lake is looking full of runoff and lighter in color compared to surrounding lakes from the construction of Lakefront Apartments.

CITIZENS OF DARTMOUTH, Ladies and Gentlemen: I have the honour to submit my report and comments on the civic events of 1953. The year 1953 showed acceleration in the progress and expansion which has been evident in recent years. The sale of Town owned land at Maynard’s Lake and on Boland Road opened the way for tremendous apartment developments, which as the year came to a close were well on their way to completion. A total of 638 apartments will be provided in these two projects which should do much to alleviate the housing shortage in the area. The opening of new subdivisions continued and many new homes have been built. A block of Town owned land near the bridge head was also disposed of for the purpose of building a shopping centre. Upon completion this centre should add materially to the commercial assessment in the Town. Road construction in …

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An interesting map of Dartmouth, circa 1950 (1955 at least I would think, since the bridge is shown). It’s quite detailed – in many cases aspirational. Check out the subdivision plan for what is now Mic Mac Mall – below the modern grid they had once hoped to construct, you can see the makeup of “The Avenue” quite clearly, a rarity for maps of the Dartmouth area. A whole plan for Manor Park that didn’t come to pass is included too. Alderney Drive was yet to be rammed through the downtown, and the original street grid is, for the most part, still present. What would’ve happened if the Province hadn’t strangled Dartmouth’s configuration with the 111 highway? We will never know, but we get an inkling thanks to this map, from the Map Corporation of America out of Boston.

The following excerpts are from “Survival of an African Nova Scotian Community: Up the Avenue, Revisited” by Adrienne Lucas Sehatzadeh, 1998. An incredible resource of the Black history of Dartmouth that is certainly worth your time to read. “The part of Crichton Avenue above Lyngby Avenue is the area where the Black settlement started. Crichton Avenue winds its way north/south from the downtown area, along the western shore of Sullivan’s Pond and Lake Banook.” “Crichton Avenue has been a major roadway in Dartmouth for over 100 years and intersects Ochterloney Street in the downtown area, about one kilometre from Halifax Harbour. The Avenue portion of Crichton Avenue extended across the circumferential highway to The Extension, where the Black community ended.” “Crichton Avenue Extension was expropriated in the late 1960s because of the expansion of the circumferential highway. The circumferential highway (not shown on the sketch) runs east less than one-half …

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