“The [Indigenous people] had appeared in the neighborhood of the town for several weeks, but intelligence had been received that they had commenced hostilities, by the capture of twenty persons at Canso… On the last day of September they made an attack on the sawmill at Dartmouth, then under the charge of Major Gilman. Six of his men had been sent out to cut wood without arms. The [Indigenous people] laid in ambush, killed four and carried off one, and the other escaped and gave the alarm, and a detachment of rangers was sent after the [Indigenous people], who having overtaken them, cut off the heads of two [Indigenous people] and scalped one. (This affair is mentioned in a letter from a gentleman in Halifax to Boston, dated October 2nd as follows: “About seven o’clock on Saturday morning before, as several of Major Gilman’s workmen with one soldier, unarmed, were …

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“The following plan for regulating the municipal affairs of this Town, has been drawn up in the form of a Charter, as the clearest and best method to express the extent of the proposed improvements. The objects have been pointed out by a thorough investigation into the various modes of conducting the public business; which was entered into in consequence of a presentment made by the Grand Jury to the Court of Quarter Sessions in December Term of 1812. The Court having appointed six different investigating committees of the Magistrates to meet the various objects contemplated by the Grand Jury, their several reports combined, clearly prove the necessity of some reform” Halifax (N.S.). The Draft of a Charter, for the Incorporation of the Town of Halifax In the Province of Nova-Scotia. Halifax [N.S.]: Printed by John Howe & Son, 1814. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/aeu.ark:/13960/t8df7r91g

Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. “A map of Cabotia” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1814. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/a9d6bc40-2357-0133-af56-58d385a7b928

“The said committees shall be appointed by the Magistrates, who shall likewise fill up all vacancies, and the said Committees shall within three days after due notice to them given, make an Alphabetical list of such persons resident within their respective Wards from eighteen years of age and upwards (not being House Servants, Daily Laborers, or People of Color) as they may conceive to be proper persons for watching and paroling or capable by their circumstances to find substitutes. (Clergymen only excepted.)” Halifax (N.S.). Rules And Regulations for the Establishment And Government of a Watch And Patrol In the Town of Halifax. Halifax [N.S.]: Printed by Edmund Ward …, 1818. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/aeu.ark:/13960/t22c0159r

“A human being as he comes originally from the hand of nature, is everywhere the same.” “…The Planter was now struck with shame, and confusion, when he recognized, in his kind protector the [Indigenous person] whom he so harshly treated. He confessed that he knew him, and was full of excuses for his brutal behavior; to which the [Indigenous person] only replied; when you see poor [Indigenous people] fainting for a cup of cold water, don’t say again, get you gone you [Indigenous] dog. The [Indigenous person] then wished him well on his journey, and left him.” It is not difficult to say which of these two had the best claim to the name of Christian.” Bromley, Walter. Mr. Bromley’s Second Address, On the Deplorable State of the Indians: Delivered In the “Royal Acadian School,” At Halifax, In Nova Scotia, March 8, 1814. [Halifax, N.S.?]: Printed at the Recorder Office, …

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Parkyns, George Isham. “Halifax, Nova Scotia, from Dartmouth Point” 1817. Aquatint and etching, inked in greyish green and dark greyish yellowish brown, coloured with water colour, on wove paper. Laid down on cardboard. https://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/detail.jsp?Entt=RDMDC-JRR2203&R=DC-JRR2203

A book with what appears to be the most bigoted account of the Mi’kmaq people I’ve read yet, out of quite a few bigoted accounts and rantings.. Just a heads up if you’re sensitive and you decide to delve into this one. “Since 1749 Nova Scotia has been governed by: General Hopson in 1752 Governor Lawrence in 1756 Rd. Monckson, Esq. Aug 17, 1757 Justice A. Belcher Oct. 1761 Gov. Wilmot, 1763, died 1766 Hon. Michael Franklin, Lieut.-Gov. 1766, continued two months Gov. Francis Legge 1773 Lieut-Gov. Arbuthnot 1776 Lieut.-Gov Richard Huhges 1778 Lieut.-Gov Sir And. Hammond 1781 John Parr, 1782, died 1791 Richard Bulkely, president and commander in chief, Nov. 26, to May 14 1791 Lieut.-Gov. Sir John Wentowrth, arrived Jan. and sworn, May 1792 Lieut.-Gov Sir G. Prevost, Jan 17 1808 Lieut.-Gov Sir J C. Sherbrooke, Aug 19 1811 Lieut.-Gov Earl Dalhousie “A Mr. Stokes was employed by …

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Duc d’Anville arrived at Chebucto, 10 Sept 1746 Halifax founded, 21 June 1749 [Indigenous people] attacked 6 men at Maj. Gilman’s saw-mill, Dartmouth Cove, killing 4, 30 Sept 1749 Saw-mill let to Capt. Wm. Clapham, 1750 Alderney arrived from Europe with 353 settlers, Aug. 1750 Town of Dartmouth laid out for the Alderney emigrants, Autumn 1750 Order issued relative to guard at Dartmouth, 31 Dec. 1750 Sergeant and 10 or 12 men ordered to mount guard during the nights at the Blockhouse, Dartmouth, 23 Feb. 1751 [Indigenous people] attacked Dartmouth, killing a number of the inhabitants, 13 May, 1751 German emigrants arrived at Halifax and were employed in picketing the back of Dartmouth, July 1751 Ferry established between Dartmouth and Halifax, John Connor, ferryman, 3 Feb. 1752 Mill at Dartmouth sold to Maj. Ezekiel Gilman, June 1752 Population of Dartmouth 193, or 53 families, July 1752 Advertisement ordered for the …

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After piecing together several Crown land grant maps, you can see the path of the Old Annapolis Road much more clearly. Open the image in a new tab, to see it in more detail. Below you’ll find a few representations of the road as a contiguous route, as opposed to what is left recorded on the Crown Land Grant maps. (You can find find the individual Crown Land Grant maps here: https://novascotia.ca/natr/land/grantmap.asp) One of the first representations of the Old Annapolis Road, “Road markt out by Gov. Parr’s orders in 1784” One of the last representations of the Old Annapolis Road: Fifteen years later, by 1927 (perhaps because it wasn’t fit for automobile travel), the Old Annapolis Road disappears.

“In the War of 1812, several United States naval officers were taken prisoners and sent to Halifax for safe keeping. These were generally quartered on the eastern side of the harbor, and those of them who were on parole were lodged in the farmhouses in or near Preston and Dartmouth.They were allowed perfect liberty of action, except in the matter of crossing the ferry to Halifax, the town being the only point from which they could hope to escape.They were all quiet, gentlemanlike men, and were cordially entertained and much liked by the farmers and their families, and they were not slow in making love to the girls, in some cases engaging to marry them.Naturally, however, they chafed at their internment, and when peace was declared were glad to leave. The Preston farmers’ daughters waited in vain for them to return to marry them; the faithless foreigners never fulfilled the …

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“…About the year 1797, John Skerry began running a public ferry, and continued so employed until after the advent of the steam-boat company. He was familiarly known as “Skipper” Skerry, and a few of the oldest inhabitants still remember the man and speak of him in words of praise. The Dartmouth terminus of his ferry was directly at the foot of Ochterloney Street, and the Halifax landing was at the Market Slip. He occupied the building, which stood, on the south-east corner of Ochterloney and Water (Alderney Drive) Streets, and there kept a small bar. The second lot from the north-west corner of Quarrel (Queen) and Water (Alderney Drive) Streets, likewise belonged to him, together with the water-lot immediately in the rear. His ferrymen, previous to leaving the landing, cried “Over! Over!”, and then blew a conch as a signal of departure. The boats were large. They were either sailed …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: Among famous men in our neighborhood about this time was James Gordon Bennett, who later founded the New York Herald. Wune biographies state that he emigrated from Scotland in 1819, and first earned a scanty livelihood on Halifax journals. But he assuredly came earlier, for he taught school just outside Dartmouth as early as 1816, and remained at least two years. In January 1819, the first use was made of the snow-covered trail from Cobequid Road to Dartmouth. Newspapers of that date reported that several sleds with produce for Halifax, were coming in by the new road and down over the Dartmouth Lakes. The landing-place is thought to have been at Banook Avenue, because that street was long known as “the winter road”. Letters advocating the commencement of the Canal project appeared frequently that winter. One writer suggested that a large …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: In January, 1818, flags half-masted on Citadel Hill announced the London death of Princess Charlotte, who had died in childbirth the previous November. As a daughter of the Prince who later became George IV, it was confidently expected that this beloved lady would one day be Queen of England. The name is noted because Portland Street in Dartmouth, was for many years afterwards called Princess Charlotte Street in her honor. That winter was again severe. Teams crossed back and forth over Bedford Basin for a much longer period than in the preceding year. In February, ice in the main harbor became clogged and so compact that teams and pedestrians passed over without danger for nearly two weeks.

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: 1817 witnessed the beginning of the first building in Dartmouth to be used exclusively for church purposes. Prominent Anglicans had already obtained a Crown grant of Block “G” where now stands Christ Church. The land was granted in trust to Thomas Boggs, Richard Tremain and James Creighton. The Earl of Dalhousie, Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, laid the corner-stone of the new edifice on Wednesday, July 9, of that year. Rev. Charles Ingles was the first rector. His wife was Hannah Hartshorne, daughter of Lawrence, senior. His mission extended from Bedford to Seaforth. Until later on, when it was formed into a separate parish, Christ Church was a chapel-of-ease to St. John’s Church at Preston.

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: During the summer of 1816, the construction of the new team-boat, or horse-boat, continued in progress. The machinery necessary to revolve the propeller seems to have been imported from New York firms experienced in rigging similar such boats. The launching took place on Monday, September 30, and the place was somewhere in Dartmouth Cove. The only previous record of a ship being built in Dartmouth was that of the “Maid of the Mill”, launched in August 1801. Among the gay crowd at high-tide that September day, there were evidently many brightly dressed ladies mingled with their companions along the shore, and others who came over from Halifax in small boating-parties. Perhaps a military band also enlivened the air. One enthusiastic spectator has left us his impression of the scene in a letter to the “Acadian Recorder” the following week: Sir,—I have …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: The spring of 1815 was very backward. As late as the month of June, slob-ice kept coming down from the Basin. In addition to that, frequent southerly winds blew much drift ice back into the harbor which often impeded £he progress of the ferry-boats. Towards the end of July, a hail-storm, attended by rain and thunder, showered down lumps of ice over two inches long, near Burnside. In this year, much of James Creighton’s Dartmouth property was put up for sale at auction by the executors of the estate. The whole of what is now the Austenville section, comprising some 67 acres, was bought by Thomas Boggs for £348 6/3. A larger block of 77 acres commenced near the foot of Sullivan’s Pond and included land on both sides of Prince Albert Road over Sinclair Street hills to Christian Bartlin’s line …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: A packet-boat from England which arrived on Saturday, May 21, 1814, brought the most welcome news in 20 years to Governor Nicholas D’Anseville still in exile at Woodlawn. Napoleon had abdicated; and the Bourbon King Louis XVIII was being restored! Mrs. Lawson, in her History of Dartmouth, says that the enthusiasm and excitement of the old Governor knew no bounds. Dressing himself in the old royalist uniform with the white hat of the Bourbons, he abandoned his customary dignity, and marched up and down the road during one whole afternoon, shouting “Vive La France”. In the autumn of 1814, smallpox broke out in an alarming manner n i the village of Dartmouth. Dr. Samuel Head, prominent Halifax auctioneer, recommended Seth Coleman as a man competent to render the inhabitants medical aid, because “He has long been in the habit of assisting …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: Word came to Halifax that England and the United States had declared war. This aroused great activity around the Dockyard and Halifax wharves where privateers were continually being fitted out for expeditions that were sometimes disastrous, but often very profitable. As owners shared prize money with crew members, no doubt many Dartmouth young men often ventured on these voyages. Preston and Woodlawn sections then began to add American officers to the number of prisoners already quartered there. Most of them were friendly and spent money freely, and thus became quite popular with the villagers. In 1812, there died William Birch Brinley, the man who built Mount Edward. He was a nephew of Sir John Wentworth, and named the estate in honor of the Duke of Kent. His wife was Joanna, daughter of John Allen whose nearby tanyard spread over the location …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: In 1811 John Prescott, probably a brother of Samuel at the Woodside brickyard, purchased Maroon Hall. He called the place Mount Cleverley” after the maiden name of his wife. For the year 1811, Lawrence Hartshorne was Surveyor of Highways for Dartmouth town-plot; and Robert Day was Constable. Marriages that year at St. Paul’s included that of John D. Iliiwthorne to Miss Mary Story daughter of Marshal Story. And at Preston in July, Miss Elizabeth Chamberlain, daughter I Theophilus, to William N. Silver of Halifax. In October occurred the deaths at Dartmouth of Mrs. Miriam Mratfher in her 60th year, relict of the late Captain Meagher; and f William Mills aged 32.

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: Friday, February 23, 1810, was appointed by the Lieut-Governor as a day of public fasting and humiliation in the Province. In the following October, Samuel Hart died at Maroon Hall. Most of his local and Halifax property was then sold for debt. A son born in 1810 in James Creighton’s home at former Fort Grenadier, Jacob St., Halifax, to James Crichton, R.N. and Mary Creighton, must have so pleased the latter’s father that he deeded 200 acres of Dartmouth land, in trust for this grandchild. Hence Crichton Avenue. Old Mr. Creighton died in 1813 in his 81st year. He had been associated with Dartmouth over 40 years. Edward Foster and Sons were still doing business in 1810 as “millsmiths, housesmiths, anchorsmiths, axe, tool and screw makers ;it their extensive Dartmouth works at the Narrows and at their newly erected shop on …

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