“WHITE HUNTERS TRESPASSED on the Dartmouth farm of Mr. Fuller, a “coloured man”, in March 1818. Fuller demanded that they vacate his property immediately, but the hunters claimed that they were on common land which belonged to no single individual or family. Fuller and the hunters traded insults, then blows. Mrs. Fuller and her children responded to the fighting with a volley of rocks which struck the hunters, prompting them to draw their guns and to order the family to retreat. Mrs. Fuller, though, defiantly informed the trespassers that the land was “our own, we are not now in the …

“We Can Do As We Like Here”: An Analysis of Self Assertion and Agency Among Black Refugees in Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1813-1821 More…

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Just a random history podcast about American History – and wouldn’t you know – it pertains to Dartmouth. Alan Taylor, the Thomas Jefferson chair of American history at the University of Virginia, is a two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for United States history and the author of seven books, most recently “The Internal Enemy: Slavery and war in Virginia 1772 to 1832. Here he relays the beginnings of his latest book: ———- “…I started out from an unusual direction in that I was doing a book about Canada and the United States during the era of the War of …

Dartmouth connections to Slavery & War of 1812 More…

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“In the War of 1812, several United States naval officers were taken prisoners and sent to Halifax for safe keeping. These were generally quartered on the eastern side of the harbor, and those of them who were on parole were lodged in the farmhouses in or near Preston and Dartmouth.They were allowed perfect liberty of action, except in the matter of crossing the ferry to Halifax, the town being the only point from which they could hope to escape.They were all quiet, gentlemanlike men, and were cordially entertained and much liked by the farmers and their families, and they were …

War of 1812 More…

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“…About the year 1797, John Skerry began running a public ferry, and continued so employed until after the advent of the steam-boat company. He was familiarly known as “Skipper” Skerry, and a few of the oldest inhabitants still remember the man and speak of him in words of praise. The Dartmouth terminus of his ferry was directly at the foot of Ochterloney Street, and the Halifax landing was at the Market Slip. He occupied the building, which stood, on the south-east corner of Ochterloney and Water (Alderney Drive) Streets, and there kept a small bar. The second lot from the …

Ferryman John Skerry More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Among famous men in our neighborhood about this time was James Gordon Bennett, who later founded the New York Herald. Wune biographies state that he emigrated from Scotland in 1819, and first earned a scanty livelihood on Halifax journals. But he assuredly came earlier, for he taught school just outside Dartmouth as early as 1816, and remained at least two years. In January 1819, the first use was made of the snow-covered trail from Cobequid Road to Dartmouth. Newspapers of that date reported that several sleds with produce for Halifax, …

1819 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In January, 1818, flags half-masted on Citadel Hill announced the London death of Princess Charlotte, who had died in childbirth the previous November. As a daughter of the Prince who later became George IV, it was confidently expected that this beloved lady would one day be Queen of England. The name is noted in these pages because Portland Street in Dartmouth, was for many years afterwards called Princess Charlotte Street in her honor. That winter was again severe. Teams crossed back and forth over Bedford Basin for a much longer …

1818 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: 1817 witnessed the beginning of the first building in Dartmouth to be used exclusively for church purposes. Prominent Anglicans had already obtained a Crown grant of Block “G” where now stands Christ Church. The land was granted in trust to Thomas Boggs, Richard Tremain and James Creighton. The Earl of Dalhousie, Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, laid the corner-stone of the new edifice on Wednesday, July 9, of that year. Rev. Charles Ingles was the first rector. His wife was Hannah Hartshorne, daughter of Lawrence, senior. His mission extended from Bedford to …

1817 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: During the summer of 1816, the construction of the new team-boat, or horse-boat, continued in progress. The machinery necessary to revolve the propeller seems to have been imported from New York firms experienced in rigging similar such boats. The launching took place on Monday, September 30, and the place was somewhere in Dartmouth Cove, pictured on page 37. The only previous record of a ship being built in Dartmouth was that of the “Maid of the Mill”, launched in August 1801. Among the gay crowd at high-tide that September day, …

1816 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: The spring of 1815 was very backward. As late as the month of June, slob-ice kept coming down from the Basin. In addition to that, frequent southerly winds blew much drift ice back into the harbor which often impeded £he progress of the ferry-boats. Towards the end of July, a hail-storm, attended by rain and thunder, showered down lumps of ice over two inches long, near Burnside. In this year, much of James Creighton’s Dartmouth property was put up for sale at auction by the executors of the estate. The …

1815 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: A packet-boat from England which arrived on Saturday, May 21, 1814, brought the most welcome news in 20 years to Governor Nicholas D’Anseville still in exile at Woodlawn. Napoleon had abdicated; and the Bourbon King Louis XVIII was being restored! Mrs. Lawson, in her History of Dartmouth, says that the enthusiasm and excitement of the old Governor knew no bounds. Dressing himself in the old royalist uniform with the white hat of the Bourbons, he abandoned his customary dignity, and marched up and down the road during one whole afternoon, …

1814 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Word came to Halifax that England and the United States had declared war. This aroused great activity around the Dockyard and Halifax wharves where privateers were continually being fitted out for expeditions that were sometimes disastrous, but often very profitable. As owners shared prize money with crew members, no doubt many Dartmouth young men often ventured on these voyages. Preston and Woodlawn sections then began to add American officers to the number of prisoners already quartered there. Most of them were friendly and spent money freely, and thus became quite …

1812 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In 1811 John Prescott, probably a brother of Samuel at the Woodside brickyard, purchased Maroon Hall. He called the place Mount Cleverley” after the maiden name of his wife. For the year 1811, Lawrence Hartshorne was Surveyor of Highways for Dartmouth town-plot; and Robert Day was Constable. Marriages that year at St. Paul’s included that of John D. Iliiwthorne to Miss Mary Story daughter of Marshal Story. And at Preston in July, Miss Elizabeth Chamberlain, daughter I Theophilus, to William N. Silver of Halifax. In October occurred the deaths at …

1811 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Friday, February 23, 1810, was appointed by the Lieut-Governor as a day of public fasting and humiliation in the Province. In the following October, Samuel Hart died at Maroon Hall. Most of his local and Halifax property was then sold for debt. A son born in 1810 in James Creighton’s home at former Fort Grenadier, Jacob St., Halifax, to James Crichton, R.N. and Mary Creighton, must have so pleased the latter’s father that he deeded 200 acres of Dartmouth land, described on page 94, in trust for this grandchild. Hence …

1810 More…

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