The following is from the definitive Dartmouth digest, ‘The Story of Dartmouth’ by Dr. John P. Martin On the morning of Thursday, December 6th, 1917, a munitions ship named the “Mont Blanc” steamed up from the harbor mouth where she had anchored overnight. Her murderous cargo consisted of deadly TNT, tons of picric acid and a deck load of benzoyl drums. About the same time, the Norwegian steamer “Imo’ chartered for Belgian relief purposes, came out of Bedford Basin. At the Narrows, these two vessels came into collision. The cause was never known. There was neither fog nor haze. A …

Halifax Explosion: Dartmouth Impacts More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: During the winter of 1917-1918 block after block of residential and commercial Dartmouth presented the appearance of a battered war-town, with most windows in nearly every house and shop boarded up and blanketed with tar-paper covering. One dwelling at 50 Pleasant St., near Burton’s Hill, remained that way for years afterward. Heaps of broken glass and debris shoveled and swept into downtown gutters, froze solidly and stayed there until spring. Not until late summer was all the drifted explosion-rubble cleaned out of corner-catchpits. Hundreds of townsfolk and visitors that year …

1918 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In 1917 the United States entered the Great War, and the Dominion Government passed a Conscription Bill. Christ Church celebrated its 100th anniversary and erected a monument to her war dead on the Church grounds. Canon C.W. Vernon published a Centenary Book of Anglican parishes hereabouts. Alexander McKay late Supervisor of Halifax Schools died at Dartmouth in April. In June the Auto Bus Company commenced a service to Woodside, Austenville and the North End. Among the promoters were G.G. Thomson, R.K. Elliott and P.H. Creighton. Hitherto everybody had hiked or pedaled, …

1917 More…

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