“Dartmouth -(Halifax Co.), on Halifax Harbor. Ferry, 15 minute service to Halifax (1 mile). 2 hotels, 6 churches, 5 public schools, park, 2 banks. Industries include cordage works, spice, chocolate and soap factory, sugar refinery, lumber mills, foundries, boiler works, rolling mills, cornmeal mills, brewery, marine railway, and skate and bolt factory. Beautiful lake scenery. Fine beach, good boating and bathing. Pop 5,058.” Heaton, E. “Opportunities in Nova Scotia, 1915: containing extracts from Heaton’s Annual.” Toronto : E. Heaton, c1914. https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.76296/1?r=0&s=1

“Dartmouth (5000), about a mile from Halifax, across the harbour, has a fine situation, and is a beautiful residential town, especially in the hilly and lake section back a little from the harbour. It has various manufactures, as sugar refining and making of rope and skates. The provincial Lunatic Asylum is in the neighbourhood of the town” Calkin, John B. “A history and geography of Nova Scotia”, A. & W. MacKinlay, 1911. https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.78688/1?r=0&s=1

“In November and December of the year 1750 the following officers were appointed to the Dartmouth militia… Robert Campbell, to be Captain Jos. Scott, Thos. Burke, Thos. Leake, Josiah Rogerson, to be Lieutenants” Edwards, Joseph Plimsoll. “The militia of Nova Scotia, 1749-1867”, 1911 https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.78682/1?r=0&s=1

Considering that most of the literature on the eugenics movement downplays or ignores its history in Nova Scotia, this amazing dissertation is proof one can’t always rely on what little is initially apparent in order to guide the search for facts, especially in regards to Nova Scotia. Never let an initial apparent lack of data discourage your efforts. If you’ve been a member of the “lower classes” in Nova Scotia you too may feel a kind of familiarity with the ways in which eugenics aims were pursued in your life, especially when it comes to experiences and interactions with teachers, …

Institutionalizing Eugenics: Custody, Class, Gender And Education In Nova Scotia’s Response To The “Feeble-Minded”, 1890-1931 More…

“It’s always called the Halifax Explosion, but the fiery blast from a collision of the ships Imo and Mont Blanc in Halifax Harbour’s Narrows the morning of Dec. 6, 1917 wreaked destruction on Dartmouth as well. About 40 people on the Dartmouth side of the harbour were killed outright. More died over the next two weeks from injuries or from pneumonia that set in after a messive snowstorm that began the night of the disaster. Former mayor Claude Morris, then a young pharmacy clerk, was lucky that day. Neither he nor his family suffered any serious injury from the blast. …

“Dartmouth, a forgotten victim of the Halifax Explosion” More…

From: Halifax Habour, Surveyed by Staff Commander W.F. Maxwell, R.N., Assisted by Staff Commanders F.W. Jarrad and P.H. Wright, R.N. 1889. The Narrows from a Canadian Government Survey, 1916. The Topography is taken from the Royal Engineers plans, with corrections and additions from the Hydrographic Department, Ottawa, 1916. Soundings in Feet, Natural Scale 1/10,560. https://memoryns.ca/halifax-harbour-1990

“The Telephone Utility is one of the oldest and largest public utilities, and perhaps the one which comes into direct contact with the most people in their workaday lives. The telephone was invented in 1876 by Alexander Graham Bell, a man well and favourably known in Nova Scotia, as during the last years of his life he made his home in Cape Breton, just outside of Baddeck. The first telephone in Halifax was installed in 1877, and the first actual commercial use of the service was at the Caledonia Mine, Cape Breton, also in the same year. At this time …

Public Utility Regulation in Nova Scotia More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: During 1919, shipload after shipload of defence forces were brought back to the port of Halifax to be discharged. The work of repatriation went on for months. In Dartmouth, a local Housing Commission was set up for the purpose of aiding returned men in the financing of new homes. Stocks of building material, hitherto limited in quantity, were now made available for all kinds of construction work. Several new contracting firms established themselves in town, bringing artisans and craftsmen to assist in the rehabilitation of the devastated northend and other sections …

1919 More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: During the winter of 1917-1918 block after block of residential and commercial Dartmouth presented the appearance of a battered war-town, with most windows in nearly every house and shop boarded up and blanketed with tar-paper covering. One dwelling at 50 Pleasant St., near Burton’s Hill, remained that way for years afterward. Heaps of broken glass and debris shoveled and swept into downtown gutters, froze solidly and stayed there until spring. Not until late summer was all the drifted explosion-rubble cleaned out of corner-catchpits. Hundreds of townsfolk and visitors that year hiked …

1918 More…