Speaking of the Colonies reminds us that the Montreal Sun of the 28th ultimo editorially refers to the political condition of Canada in rather a striking manner. It states, we observe, that even the Toronto Globe has been forced to admit that Ontario is within the category of Provinces where the “canker of corruption” is eating out the life of the Government, where there exists a premeditated system of thieving from the public purse, an organized system of ballot-stuffing and ballot-switching. “Added to this,” says the Sun, “we have just witnessed the horrifying perjury in connection with the Gamey charges, …

Strong Argument Against Confederation More…

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This is the lower part of Old Ferry Road, once known as “Green Lane”. The curve in the foreground leads to the Old Ferry Wharf, in the background is the hill to Pleasant Street and Portland Street. The fence on the left enclosed the South End Lawn Tennis Courts, and from there to the shore stood Regal willow trees. Two of them were named for King George III and Queen Charlotte, and two others for Mr. and Mrs. James Creighton of “Brooklands” who had them planted perhaps in the late 1700’s. When this picture was taken about 1900, they were …

Green Lane More…

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“This first picture was taken at the intersection of Prince Albert Road and Ochterloney Street on Saturday, September 14, 1907 (Below, as it looks in more modern times). The length of the shadow of the telephone pole indicates that the morning is not far advanced, yet there is almost a complete absence of pedestrian or vehicular traffic because by this time of day the market wagons and ice-carts have passed along to the ferry. An occasional delivery team from a downtown store might go by, otherwise, the quietude remained unbroken until noon hour when workmen came out of the Skate Factory …

September 14th, 1907 More…

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1870 map of Dartmouth superimposed on 2013

From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Marine Street was Point Street. South Street was Boggs Street. Portland Street was Front Street, Princess Charlotte Street and Hartshorne Street. At the lower Canal bridge, Portland Street followed the route of the present Prince Albert Road, and continued north to the Town boundary at Carters Pond Queen Street was Quarrell St., and appears to be unchanged from its location of 1750. Ochterloney Street was “the road from Skerry’s Inn”. Park Avenue was Stairs Street. On early plans, the hillside near Edward Street, is marked “north range”. Commercial Street was …

Dartmouth Street Names of Olde More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: By 1909 efforts were still being made to start construction work on the Nova Scotia Eastern Railway. Rumors that the Provincial Government were considering an advance of one million dollars to promoters of the railroad, aroused strong protests from County Councilors that winter. They passed a resolution pointing out to the Government that such a financial outlay would benefit only a certain section of Halifax County, whereas if the same amount were applied to the macadamizing and widening of trunk roads, ‘the money would be expended to much better advantage. …

1909 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: A major change in educational arrangements was made by an Act of the Legislature in, 1908 when all districts outside the boundaries of Dartmouth were separated from the Town, as far as school accommodation was concerned. Ever since incorporation in 1873, Dartmouth had provided for the education of pupils living in the vicinity of Tufts’ Cove, of Cole Harbor Road and of Woodside. Residents of these places then paid school taxes to the Town, and general taxes to the County. The new Act authorized the organization of the Woodside-Tufts’ Cove …

1908 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In 1907 a move was made to bring Woodside into the Town. (Woodside had always been linked with Dartmouth, as regards schools.) The Sugar Refinery, whose 20-year exemption from County taxes had expired, now wished to make an arrangement with Dartmouth to obtain a fixed assessment for a further 20-year period. Thereupon the Town Council prepared a bill providing for the extension of Dartmouth boundaries to include Woodside. This measure met defeat in the Legislature largely because of the protests of County Councilors who called the scheme unethical. About that …

1907 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In the winter of 1906 Ropework employees marched in a body to attend the funeral of Hon. William J. Stairs at Halifax. Mr. Stairs was the founder of their establishment, and the man whose spirit of enterprise and purpose was largely responsible for developing the northend of Dartmouth. Prior to the coming of Ropework families after 1868, there were vast areas of woods and pasture in that section of town paying only a few dollars taxes. Mr. Stairs also lived on our side of the harbor for several summers. At …

1906 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: The year 1905 ushered in the winter of the big snow when drifts around the streets and on the sidewalks accumulated to a height of over ten feet. Traffic was either at a standstill or was so tied-up that milkmen from rural Dartmouth had to use two horses tandem to haul light sleigh-loads. On a dozen different nights that winter, the thermometer went below zero, reaching a minimum of 22 below on February 6th. In those years there was a specific part of Dartmouth from which the law required that …

1905 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Dozens of householders moved on May day. As winter broke up, cardboard signs would appear in porch windows reading: “To Let, Possession May 1st.” Houses that remained vacant for a year or more were looked upon as being haunted. For $10 or $15 a month you could rent dwellings of eight or nine rooms with large backyards and driveways. For $25 per month you could almost have the pick of the Town. The Telephone Company purchased the residence at 69 King Street in 1904, and moved from 19 Edward Street. …

1904 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In January of 1903 Captain J. Taylor Wood of Halifax, lecture before the Dartmouth Literary Society on his experiences while i command of the “Tallahassee” during the American Civil War. An Act to incorporate the Banook Canoe Club Limited we passed by the Legislature in April. The capital stock was $3,000, an the incorporators were Arthur Weston, Robert E. Finn, Kenneth I Forbes, W. H. Sterns, jr., and J. P. L. Stewart. At Ottawa in May, James D. McKenna of Dartmouth, enthralled everyone in the darkened House of Commons by …

1903 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In February 1902 the last of the old-style “Town meetings” was held. The question discussed that night was the purchase of Daniel Donovan’s pasture-land which drained into Lake Lamont. On a show of hands, the proposal was rejected by a vote of 42 to 27. Within the next few weeks, legislation was obtained providing that in future all such matters must be decided by a plebiscite. In 1902 a frightful epidemic of smallpox struck at Dartmouth. The dreadful disease raged from February until the end of June. It began in …

1902 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In January 1901 died Queen Victoria. Shops and public places everywhere were draped in mourning. At Dartmouth the school children were assembled one afternoon in the auditorium of St. Peter’s Hall where appropriate orations were delivered, and where many of those present sang for the last time the familiar anthem of four generations, “God Save the Queen”. At 18 Prince Street that winter died Postmaster John E. Leadley who had come from Windsor in 1864 to work at Symonds’ Foundry. Mr. Leadley afterwards operated an Inn at the present 19 …

1901 More…

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