DARTMOUTH, Halifax County: This city is located on the east side of Halifax Harbour. A [Mi’kmaq] name was Boonamoogwaddy, “Tomcod ground.” The English name may have been given in honor of William Legge, Earl of Dartmouth, Colonial Secretary 1772-75, but it was probably named for the Devonshire port of Dartmouth. In August, 1750, the Alderney arrived in Halifax (Chebucto) Harbour with 353 settlers on board. On August 23 the Council resolved to settle them across the Harbour from Halifax. Before the end of 1750, a blockhouse and small military post had been built. In 1751 the settlers suffered from an [Indigenous] attack. After the American Revolution an oil factory was set up and operated by a Nantucket Whaling Company about 1785 to 1792. They built a meeting-house about …

Place Names and Places of Nova Scotia (in Dartmouth Township) Read More…

Dartmouth: 1478 Males, 1668 Females, Total population 3,155. Number of families 559, 492 Married, 1057 Single, 119 Widows. Deaf: M: 2, Blind: M: 2, F: 1. Cannot Read Above 15 years of Age: M: 214, F: 246 Cannot Write Above 15 years of Age: M: 228, F: 287 [Black] persons included in population: 197 [Indigenous people] not included in population: 34 By Origin: Dartmouth: Total Population: 3155, “Natives”: 2628, England: 107, Wales: 2, Scotland: 78, Ireland: 205, Guernsey: 1, Jersey: 4, Canada: 13, New Brunswick: 29, Newfoundland: 18, Prince Edward Island: 2, West Indies: 10, United States of America: 45, France: 1, Italy: 1, Other peoples in the Mediterranean: 7, Germany: 2, East Indies: 1, All other places: 1. By Religion: Church of England: 1115, Church of Rome: …

Census, Township of Dartmouth, 1861 Read More…

Dartmouth Township: Numbers in each family: 19 men, 7 boys, 1 [Black] man, 11 women, 1 girl. Total persons in the township: 39. Religion: 30 Protestant, 9 Roman Catholic. Country: 13 English, 9 Irish, 8 Americans, 9 German & other foreigners. Stock and Substance: 14 horses, 1 Oxen & bulls, 6 cows, 2 young neat cattle, 4 swine. Produce of the last year: 40 bushels of oats. Alteration of inhabitants since last year: 2 males, 3 females, 5 total born in the past year. 1 male died. 1 male, 1 female arrived. “A General Return of the several Townships in the Province of Nova Scotia the first day of January 1767” https://archives.novascotia.ca/census/RG1v443/returns/?ID=1

“List of Contributors: … P. McNab, Dartmouth – barley and oats.” “On the east side of the harbor is situated the town of Dartmouth, settled in 1750. The town is well situated, and is admirably adapted to the employment of ship-building. It is connected with the city by steamboats.” “Prior to 1719 (at which time Annapolis was the seat of government) the management of the civil affairs of the province was vested solely in the Governor; and, in his absence, in the Lieutenant-Governor or the Commander-in-Chief. In 1719, Governor Phillips, who succeeded Mr. Nicholson, received instructions from the British Ministry to choose a Council from amongst the principal English inhabitants, and, until an Assembly could be formed, to regulate himself by the instructions of the Governor of Virginia. …

Nova Scotia in 1862: papers relating to the two great exhibitions in London of that year Read More…

“The [Indigenous people] had appeared in the neighborhood of the town for several weeks, but intelligence had been received that they had commenced hostilities, by the capture of twenty persons at Canso… On the last day of September they made an attack on the sawmill at Dartmouth, then under the charge of Major Gilman. Six of his men had been sent out to cut wood without arms. The [Indigenous people] laid in ambush, killed four and carried off one, and the other escaped and gave the alarm, and a detachment of rangers was sent after the [Indigenous people], who having overtaken them, cut off the heads of two [Indigenous people] and scalped one. (This affair is mentioned in a letter from a gentleman in Halifax to Boston, dated …

History of Halifax City Read More…

“The territorial distribution of the Nova Scotia government is – 1. Eastern division, 2. Middle; 3. Western; 4. Halifax; 5. Cape Breton; there are ten counties, some of which are again subdivided into districts and townships for the more convenient administration of justice. The only counties divided into districts are, Halifax into three, viz. Halifax, Colchester, and Pictou; and Sydney into Lower and Upper. The townships are not all of equal extent, nor of equal number in each county, viz. in Halifax there are Halifax, Dartmouth, Preston, and Lawrence Town (in Halifax District)…” “Halifax division, containing part of the county of the same name, and the townships of Haliax, Dartmouth, Preston and Lawrence Town, is thus presented in the last census: “The naval capital of British North America, …

History of Nova Scotia, Cape Breton, the Sable Islands, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, the Bermudas, Newfoundland, &c., &c. Read More…

The term “proprietor” was used in two distinct senses in the American colonies. In order fully to understand the nature and the scope of the present study, therefore, it is necessary at the outset to distinguish these two usages. “The more familiar usage of the word “proprietor” is with reference to the proprietary provinces. The “Lords Proprietary” or “Lords Proprietors,” whether single persons or groups of grantees, were created and constituted by the crown on the model of the Palatinate of Durham. They held both territorial and governmental powers and like “the feudal seigneurs of the middle ages, became, or aimed to become, the lords of great colonial territories to which they were to stand as to any fief or estate of land.” The institution, in this sense, …

The town proprietors of the New England Colonies: a study of their development, organization, activities and controversies, 1620-1770 Read More…

“In the autumn of 1852, the compiler with a few friends made an excursion to the Schoodie Lakes to enjoy a few weeks in hunting and fishing in that region. Here a part of the Passamaquoddy tribe has for centuries made its home, and it was while recording by fire-light in a tent the recollections and traditionary legends of this people and their fathers, that he first heard of their services in the revolution, and of the name and exploits of John Allan. And here too he saw the documents which have been preserved with great care and fidelity by the tribe.” “Friends Brothers & Countrymen, In the Spring of the year we received with Joy and Gladness, a very kind letter from our friend and brother His …

Military operations in eastern Maine and Nova Scotia during the revolution, chiefly compiled from the journals and letters of Colonel John Allan Read More…

“In the year 1799 the Bishop of Nova Scotia reported to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts that the Province was being troubled by “an enthusiastic and dangerous spirit” among the sect called “Newlights”, whose religion seemed to be a “strange jumble of New England Independency and Behmenism.” Through the teaching of these “ignorant mechanics and common laborers”, the people were being excited to a “pious frenzy,” and a rage for dipping” prevailed over all the western counties. It was further believed by the Bishop and the Anglican clergy that these sectaries were engaged in a plan for “a total Revolution in Religion and Civil Government.” “…as Bishop Inglis recognized, the movement was a continuation of the great revival or religion which occurred …

The Great Awakening in Nova Scotia, 1776-1809 Read More…

“Township of Dartmouth Opposite the Town of Halifax, the Town called Dartmouth was laid out in the Year 1749; but in the war of 1756, the [Indigenous people] collected in great force on the basin of Minas, ascended the Shubenacadie in their canoes, and in the night surprised the guard, and killed, scalped, or carried away the most of the settlers; from which period the settlement went to decline, and was almost derelict until the year 1784, when a number of families were encouraged to settle there from Nantucket, to carry on the whale fishery. The town was then laid out in a new form, and cultivation and business revived with spirit and activity, and very encouraging expectations were formed of success in the whale fishery by all …

Instructions under the direction of the Secretary of State for the Colonial Department Read More…

“Dartmouth – A flourishing and beautiful village, opposite Halifax, at the head of the harbor, township of Dartmouth, county of Halifax. A steam ferry plies between here and the city. Dartmouth boasts of many fine buildings, contains several large foundries, three steam tanneries, employing a large number of men, and the residences of a number of merchants and others doing business in the city. The Provincial Lunatic asylum is half a mile from the village. Dartmouth is the proposed terminus of the Intercolonial railway. Montague Gold mines about 4 miles in the interior are being worked with great activity; according to the Gold Commissioners report for 1869, the total yield for that year was 805 ozs, valued at $16,100, average yield per ton 1 oz. 9 dwts., maximum …

Lovell’s Province of Nova Scotia directory for 1871 Read More…