More time is spent describing Dartmouth here than in many other similar books of its kind, yet another instance of 1756 being given as the date of Dartmouth’s “destruction” at the hands of the Mi’kmaq. The timing of 1756 in regards to the delay of the institution of representative government at Halifax until 1758, and the requirement of a population of 50 families in order to qualify for a representative in the legislature, has always struck me as curious. Earlier events, such as the arrival and settlement of various “wastrels” as well as the “King’s bad bargains” has led me to question whether it was the Mi’kmaq who were involved in the “destruction of Dartmouth” at all, but instead whether it was settlers dressed up as Indians (a technique seen later during the Tea Party). I’m not sure how far those intent on advancing their position would go, whether it …

A Plan of National Colonization Read More…

“In this letter Oliver Cromwell instructs John Leverett (1616-1679), then military governor of Acadia, to turn over the captured forts in Nova Scotia to Col. Thomas Temple.” “Whereas wee have committed unto our Trusty and welbeloved Colonell Thomas Temple the charge custody and government of our Forts of St. John, Port Royall, and Pentacoet in Acadia commonly called Nova Scotia in America, and the Martiall stores and provisions there being or thereunto belonging; Our will and pleasure therefore is, That you deliver or cause to bee delivered unto the said Thomas Temple ymediatly upon his arrivall there, the full and peaceable possession of the said Forts, and of all the Ordnance, Gunnes, Amunicon, and martiall stores, and other provisions of Victualls, Clothes, Barkes, Boates, Shipps and other thinges Whatsoever in the said Forts, or any of them, being or of right belonging to this Commonwealth by a true and just …

Instructions from Oliver Cromwell to John Leverett (written by James Nutley), 26 September 1656 Read More…

Minute of Articles proposed by Capt. Breedon on the part of Col. Thos. Temple, Lieut. Gen. of Nova Scotia, to Lord Fienes and others, the Company of Adventures, for settling a trade in those parts; the course first designed by the adventurers not being thought convenient. The Company to advance a stock of 10,000l. Col. Temple to be allowed 500l. per annum, with other privileges, which, with those to be enjoyed by the Company, are detailed. It is desired by the Company that a treaty may be forthwith concluded with the French Ambassador, for settlement of all pretences to Nova Scotia, or, if that be refused, that the English may have power to invade the French in their possessions in that country. The French remaining at Port Royal by treaty, to submit to the government of his Highness, or quit their farms, and be transported elsewhere. Petition of Capt. Thomas …

America and West Indies Colonial Papers: January 1659 Read More…

Statement of the case of Thomas Temple and William Crowne, and how they became proprietors of Nova Scotia. In 1656, when the Lord de La Tour was compounding with Cromwell to get his country of Nova Scotia again, but not being able to pay what Cromwell required, he requested Temple and Crowne to undertake it for him, and so by the advice of Sir Orlando Bridgeman, La Tour by deed conveyed all his right and title in Nova Scotia, with all his profits and privileges, to said Temple and Crowne and their heirs and assigns for ever, the consideration to pay 1,800l. to Cromwell’s soldiers, then in La Tour’s forts ; 3,376l. 18s. to the relict of Major Gibbons, of New England, for redemption of mortgage on La Tour’s fort of St. John’s, the 20th skin of all furs taken within said country, and the 20th part of the increase …

America and West Indies Colonial Papers: June 1661 Read More…

Council of Trade and Plantations to Committee of Privy Council. Representation upon petition of Mrs. Campbell. Continue : We have discoursed hereupon with Coll. Philips, H.M. Governour of Nova Scotia, and likewise with Mrs. Campbell the petitioner, who hath laid before us several papers and affidavits relating to her title to the aforesaid lands and quit rents in Nova Scotia, from whence it appears, That in 1631 the Most Christian King Lewis XIII gave the Government of Nova Scotia or Accadie to Monsieur Charles de St. Estienne, Sieur de la Tour, grandfather to the petitioner, who had Letters Patents granted to him thereupon. What the particulars contained in the said Letters Patent were, does not appear, because no copies of them have been produced to us, but upon the death of Lewis XIII, his son Lewis XIV etc. having been informed of the progress and improvements made in Accadie by …

America and West Indies Colonial Papers: October 1733, 16-31 Read More…

Col. Thos. Temple to [Lord Fienes and Company]. Has received their letter and cargo by Capt. Middleton. Acknowledges their goodness in taking him and his affairs into their protection. The produce of the cargo, with a suitable profit, shall be sent to London as soon as trade will permit. Capt. Middleton has explored the country in a barque belonging to Col. Temple, with good pilots, but is now dangerously sick. Is emboldened to express his thoughts and knowledge of “this business.” Nova Scotia very considerable to England, from the staple commodities it may produce; the chief, fishing. Furs, all sorts of mines, timber, excellent coals, and oil fishing in great abundance. Refers them to the instructions he has given Capt. Breedon, one of the chief of the New England merchants; has empowered him to contract with the Company on his part. Has concluded with Col. Crowne for a portion of …

America and West Indies Colonial Papers: December 1658 Read More…

“Answer to the Ambassador of France, or rather Mons. Le Bourne, his claim to Acadia and Nova Scotia.” The claims of England to Pentagoet, St. John’s, Port Royal, and La Have, as first possessed by the subjects of that King, and granted to Sir Wm. Alexander and La Tour. The hostile proceedings of Le Bourne in August last, in forcibly taking possession of La Have ; his barbarous usage of the English, turning them upon an island to live upon grass and wade in the water for lobsters to keep them alive, and imprisoning them at Rochelle. That Nova Scotia is of great importance to his Majesty, and as it borders upon New England it would be neither safe nor honourable to give it up, for that would enable the French to invade and infest New England at their pleasure. And since Le Bourne has surprised our plantation and fishing …

America and West Indies Colonial Papers: February 1662 Read More…