“WHITE HUNTERS TRESPASSED on the Dartmouth farm of Mr. Fuller, a “coloured man”, in March 1818. Fuller demanded that they vacate his property immediately, but the hunters claimed that they were on common land which belonged to no single individual or family. Fuller and the hunters traded insults, then blows. Mrs. Fuller and her children responded to the fighting with a volley of rocks which struck the hunters, prompting them to draw their guns and to order the family to retreat. Mrs. Fuller, though, defiantly informed the trespassers that the land was “our own, we are not now in the …

“We Can Do As We Like Here”: An Analysis of Self Assertion and Agency Among Black Refugees in Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1813-1821 More…

Tagged with: , , , ,

“Writing in the posthumously published final version of his historical chronicle of early Halifax town, lawyer-archivist Thomas Beamish Akins condemned the infamous 1820 state trial, R. v. Wilkie, in these memorable words: An anonymous pamphlet was published from the press of A.H. [Anthony Henry] Holland, charging the magistrates of the town with malpractices, which caused much excitement. It was discovered to have been written by Mr. William Wilkie, of Halifax. He was indicted for libel, tried at the Easter term of the Supreme Court [17 April 1820] and sentenced to two years imprisonment with hard labor in the House of …

Sedition in Nova Scotia: R. v. Wilkie (1820) and the Incontestable Illegality of Seditious Libel before R. v. Howe (1835) More…

Tagged with: , ,

From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: The year 1824 witnessed the first curling matches on Dartmouth Lake. The game was introduced hereabouts by Sir Houston Stewart, Captain of H. M. S. Menai, then on this station. The Legislature that spring voted the largest sum yet for the road from Dartmouth to Fletcher’s. The amount was £200. Another noteworthy fact is that from then on, this highway was under the category of Great Roads of the Province. The section from Graham’s Corner was cut through land which was part of Christian Bartlin’s grant, but in 1824 was …

1824 More…

Tagged with:

From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Lyle’s historic shipyard was located just south of the present Shipyards, on that stretch of shore below the railway line paralleling Cunard Street. Besides owning water lots there, Lyle purchased from Samuel Cunard the triangular piece of land now bounded by Prince, South and the waterfront. Lyle’s shipyard started about 1823. The era of wooden shipbuilding, which lasted over a century, began to develop about this time. The shipyard of John Chappell, established prior to that of Alexander Lyle, is thought to have been on the shore where now stand …

1823 More…

Tagged with: ,

From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Old Ferry Inn. Farmers stabled horses here, and sailed to Halifax with produce. Road in foreground extended easterly to the Passage. This sketch was made about 1820.

Tagged with:

From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Some idea of the appearance of Dartmouth may be gathered from the following unusually long description published in the Acadian Recorder, October 31, 1829: “DARTMOUTH—On Monday, the frame of a new Catholic chapel was raised in this delightfully situated little village. The caulking of the Steam Boat was nearly completed, and she appears ready for her machinery; piles are driving, and repairs making at the wharf intended for her use. Considerable animation seemed to pervade every quarter, which made the town appear very attractive. We are glad to witness indications …

1829 More…

Tagged with:

From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: At the beginning of 1828, readers of the “Nova Scotian” learned that the paper had a new editor. He was Joseph Howe, a talented young man, then about 25 years of age. The first Dartmouth activity to record, occurred in the predawn of January 4th, when local firemen and the team-boat crew were aroused to help fight a big fire on Duke St., in Halifax. Our new hand-engine rendered valuable assistance. The first Commissioners “for repairing and keeping the streets of Dartmouth” were appointed by the Legislature in the session …

1828 More…

Tagged with:

From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In the summer of 1827, Engineer Hall reported that “800 tons of granite stone have been removed from the Quarry to Dartmouth Lake. A commodious line of road is now completed from the head of Dartmouth Lake parallel with the Canal. By this road, the Lock Stone will be conveyed”. (Shown on page 442.) This must also; mean the laying out of Maitland Street, because the terminus of the Canal was at first intended to be located on the shore there, as mentioned on page 28. In July 1827, a …

1827 More…

Tagged with:

From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Christ Church at Dartmouth was consecrated by Bishop Inglis on Sunday, August 21, in the presence of a numerous gathering including Hon. Michael Wallace, Chief Justice Archibald and “other respectable individuals”. As the Rev. Charles Ingles had gone to Sydney in 1825, the parish was without a resident rector until Rev. Edward L. Benwell, an Englishman, came to Dartmouth in December of 1826. The first regatta on Halifax harbor was held in the summer of 1826 as part of the program arranged for the visit of Lord Dalhousie. All the …

1826 More…

Tagged with:

From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: One of the worst conflagrations of early Dartmouth occurred in June 1825, when fire broke out on the premises of Edward Langley in the vicinity of Church and Commercial Streets. In an outbuilding adjoining his barns and residence, there were about 300 pounds of freshly burnt lime in storage. A fall of rain leaking into a cask, created spontaneous heat that burst into flame and quickly spread to the hayloft nearby. As the fire-brigade could not obtain sufficient water, the wardens ordered the Langley residence pulled down, which was soon accomplished, …

1825 More…

Tagged with:

From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: The first Fire Department of Dartmouth was organized on September 21, 1822, and comprised the following citizens: Captain William Allen, Sec’y E. H. Lowe, Lieut. James Coleman, Henry Yetter, James Allen, Andrew Malcom, John Tapper, George Coleman, and Benjamin Elliot. Membership was limited to nine men. Dartmouth, a rising village could now boast a fire-engine, a Board of Firewards and a new engine-house. This building stood on Queen Street near Wentworth, and was about the size of a modern single garage. Meetings were held on the first Monday of the month, …

1822 More…

Tagged with:

From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: The teacher at Dartmouth in 1820-1821 was Daniel Sutherland, who taught at least from November until May. The trustees then were John Skerry, William Allen and Joseph Moreland. Canon Vernon’s History of Christ Church states that the reports of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, contain the name of Mrs. Mary Munn, who was paid £5 per annum as schoolmistress at Dartmouth commencing from 1821. This lady, who was familiarly referred to as “Ma Munn”, is thought to have been the widow of James Munn, builder of the …

1821 More…

Tagged with: