“Disaster is frequently the parent of legislation. In surveying the long history of Nova Scotia, we find this saying particularly true.” “The first recorded instance of illness in Nova Scotia is the account of Champlain of an outbreak of scurvy at Port Royal in 1606. His group of settlers had spent the winter of 1605 at St. Croix Island, where, of a group of seventy-nine, forty-four died of scurvy. In Port Royal in the following year twelve of forty-five died.” “Of all the epidemics, that of smallpox carried with it the greatest destruction and terror. In 1694 an epidemic was …

The Development of Public Health in Nova Scotia More…

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In the Royal Gazette for July 1809, the livestock of Maroon lull was advertised to be sold at Mr. Bell’s Ferry House Old Ferry Inn, at one o’clock on Saturday the 29th. The lot included one pair of beef oxen, one pair small oxen, seven milk cows, one calf, six handsome horses and one bay stallion. Theophilus Chamberlain advertised the loss on the Preston Road between Crane’s and Ross’ of a linen girdle two feet long and three inches wide, containing 50 guineas and two Joes. The owner was Monsieur Chaunion, a prisoner of war at Mr. Crane’s, who offered …

1809 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: At Silver’s Hill, the slope no doubt originally extended down to the lake shore. Pioneer trails generally avoided lowlands. Hence this “new” road to Preston followed the broad path still seen on the hillside below Sinclair Street, until it emerged around the bend at that bay of the lake called by the Mi’kmaq “Hooganinny Cove”. The causeway-bridge over Carter’s Pond at the town limits, was very likely built during the time of the Maroons, for the road is shown on military maps as early as 1808, indicating that this section …

1808 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: On Wednesday, March 11, 1807, Christian Bartlin and Alexander McDonald were drowned by the oversetting of their boat as they were returning home from Halifax. (This man may have been a son of Christian Bartlin who died here in 1792). In that same year 1807, ferryman John Skerry purchased from Dr. Clifford the premises at Ochterloney and Commercial Streets, mentioned on page 99, and also the wharf on the shore below. This was formerly Maroon wharf or King’s wharf, and no doubt used by Skerry when he took over the …

1807 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: The spring of the year 1806 was one of exceptional drought. Pumps and wells were bailed to the dregs. The woods were like tinder. To aggravate the situation, destructive forest fires raged in the rural areas of Dartmouth. On Thursday evening, May 29th, the cottage on Old Preston Road belonging to Margaret Floyer and occupied by Governor D’Anseville, together with all the elegant furniture and decorations, and the surrounding outbuildings were entirely consumed. A house out there owned by Hon. Michael Wallace, and another belonging to Mrs. Phoebe Moody had …

1806 More…

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