Since few of these old newspapers are properly scanned with OCR, being multiple columns of faded text, I’ve done my best to transcribe what seemed to be the most interesting parts of this edition. It contains a number of references to the Stamp Act as well as news from the other colonies, one being a letter from Benjamin Franklin’s son William. The Nova Scotia Gazette: Containing the freshest Intelligence, foreign and domestic. From Thursday, November 21, to Thursday November 28, 1765. Price six pence single. Thoughts on Various subjects: Party is the madness of many for the gain of a few. To endeavor to work upon the vulgar with fine sense, is like attempting to hew blocks with a razor. A man should never be ashamed to own …

Nova Scotia Gazette, Nov 21 1765. Read More…

DARTMOUTH, Halifax County: This city is located on the east side of Halifax Harbour. A [Mi’kmaq] name was Boonamoogwaddy, “Tomcod ground.” The English name may have been given in honor of William Legge, Earl of Dartmouth, Colonial Secretary 1772-75, but it was probably named for the Devonshire port of Dartmouth. In August, 1750, the Alderney arrived in Halifax (Chebucto) Harbour with 353 settlers on board. On August 23 the Council resolved to settle them across the Harbour from Halifax. Before the end of 1750, a blockhouse and small military post had been built. In 1751 the settlers suffered from an [Indigenous] attack. After the American Revolution an oil factory was set up and operated by a Nantucket Whaling Company about 1785 to 1792. They built a meeting-house about …

Place Names and Places of Nova Scotia (in Dartmouth Township) Read More…

Dartmouth Township: Numbers in each family: 19 men, 7 boys, 1 [Black] man, 11 women, 1 girl. Total persons in the township: 39. Religion: 30 Protestant, 9 Roman Catholic. Country: 13 English, 9 Irish, 8 Americans, 9 German & other foreigners. Stock and Substance: 14 horses, 1 Oxen & bulls, 6 cows, 2 young neat cattle, 4 swine. Produce of the last year: 40 bushels of oats. Alteration of inhabitants since last year: 2 males, 3 females, 5 total born in the past year. 1 male died. 1 male, 1 female arrived. “A General Return of the several Townships in the Province of Nova Scotia the first day of January 1767” https://archives.novascotia.ca/census/RG1v443/returns/?ID=1

Noticed: “America Point” at the north end of the Halifax peninsula, “Saw Mill River” on the Dartmouth side. Turner, James. “This Map of the Province of Nova-Scotia and parts adjacent” Sold by Andrew Hook in Philadelphia 2d. Edition 1760. https://hdl.huntington.org/digital/collection/p15150coll4/id/1957

“When Halifax was first settled, this side of the harbor was the home and hunting ground of the [Mi’kmaq people]. Soon after the settlement of Halifax, Major Gillman built a saw mill in Dartmouth Cove on the stream flowing from the Dartmouth lakes. On September 30th 1749, the [Indigenous people] attacked and killed four and captured one out of six unarmed men who were cutting wood near Gillman’s mill. In August 1750, the Alderney, of 504 tons, arrived at Halifax with 353 immigrants, a town was laid out on the eastern side of the harbor in the autumn, given the name of Dartmouth, and granted as the home of these new settlers. A guard house and military fort was established at what is still known as Blockhouse hill. …

The story of Christ Church, Dartmouth Read More…

“This was the first revised edition of Nova Scotia statutes. It contains, session by session, 1758-Oct. 1766, the text of acts passed and still in force, with titles of acts passed but no longer in force. Laws of a temporary character formerly published among the permanent enactments of each session were excluded from this work and published in a separate revised edition (No. 114) a little later. This distinction between Perpetual and Temporary acts was continued in the sessional publications, the laws of each session being published thenceforward in two series, Perpetual and Temporary, paged in continuation of this work and No. 114 respectively.” “And for the better preventing of false Alarms, Be it further enacted by the Authority aforefaid, That no Captain, Master or Commander of any …

The perpetual acts of the general assemblies of His Majesty’s province of Nova Scotia Read More…

1746-1799 Duc d’Anville arrived at Chebucto, 10 Sept 1746 Halifax founded, 21 June 1749 [Indigenous people] attacked 6 men at Maj. Gilman’s saw-mill, Dartmouth Cove, killing 4, 30 Sept 1749 Saw-mill let to Capt. Wm. Clapham, 1750 Alderney arrived from Europe with 353 settlers, Aug. 1750 Town of Dartmouth laid out for the Alderney emigrants, Autumn 1750 Order issued relative to guard at Dartmouth, 31 Dec. 1750 Sergeant and 10 or 12 men ordered to mount guard during the nights at the Blockhouse, Dartmouth, 23 Feb. 1751 [Indigenous people] attacked Dartmouth, killing a number of the inhabitants, 13 May, 1751 German emigrants arrived at Halifax and were employed in picketing the back of Dartmouth, July 1751 Ferry established between Dartmouth and Halifax, John Connor, ferryman, 3 Feb. 1752 …

Chronological Table of Dartmouth, Preston, and Lawrencetown Read More…

After piecing together several Crown land grant maps, you can see the path of the Old Annapolis Road much more clearly. Open the image in a new tab, to see it in more detail. Below you’ll find a few representations of the road as a contiguous route, as opposed to what is left recorded on the Crown Land Grant maps. (You can find find the individual Crown Land Grant maps here: https://novascotia.ca/natr/land/grantmap.asp) One of the earliest road maps, from 1755. “A New map of Nova Scotia and Cape Britain”, https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b53089581f An excellent early road map from 1768. “Map of Nova Scotia, or Acadia, with the islands of Cape Breton and St. John’s, from actual surveys” https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b53209890m Previous to the construction of the more direct route to Annapolis, this …

Old Annapolis Road Read More…

“Disaster is frequently the parent of legislation. In surveying the long history of Nova Scotia, we find this saying particularly true.” “The first recorded instance of illness in Nova Scotia is the account of Champlain of an outbreak of scurvy at Port Royal in 1606. His group of settlers had spent the winter of 1605 at St. Croix Island, where, of a group of seventy-nine, forty-four died of scurvy. In Port Royal in the following year twelve of forty-five died.” “Of all the epidemics, that of smallpox carried with it the greatest destruction and terror. In 1694 an epidemic was present among the [Indigenous people] of Acadia, but we have no knowledge of the number dying as a result. We may be sure it was large, however…” “There …

The Development of Public Health in Nova Scotia Read More…

“It is well known that America is a country full of forests, mountains, &c. That in such a country a small irregular force can give abundance of trouble to a regular one that is much greater: And that, in the last war, one of the fifteen Colonies we now have there (and one far short of being the strongest) held out five years against twenty five thousand British regular troops, joined by twenty-five thousand Colonists on their own pay, and aided by a strong fleet of men of war. (The one colony is of course Quebec; the other that is added to the familiar thirteen is presumably Nova Scotia.)” “On Civil War, 25 August 1768,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Franklin/01-15-02-0107

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: By 1761, the Mi’kmaq raids were at an end. After peace was made with the French in 1763, no more casualties seem to have occurred. The year 1765 must have brought considerable excitement to Dartmouth, for it was in the month of May that hangings occurred. A search through the Supreme Court files, however, shows that six men were sent to the gallows that spring. Mr. Mullane omitted the name of John Evans. All six gave their occupation as sailors, perhaps merchant seamen. Driscoll and Lawlor, convicted of murdering a man and a woman at Halifax on April 25, were sentenced to hang on May 20. The charge against Donnelly, Taylor, Smith and Evans was, “that on April 26, …

1760s Read More…