“A list of the families in part of Nova Scotia, dated Halifax, July, 1752, states that there were within the town of Dartmouth: 53 families, 81 males above sixteen, 47 females above 16, 29 males under 16, 38 females under 16; total 193.” (Selections from the Public Documents of N.S., p 670)

BUSINESS DIRECTORY FOR DARTMOUTH.OFFICIALS Hon. J.W. Johnston, Judge in EquityHon. Joseph Howe, Commissioner of FisheriesLawrence Hartshorne, City TreasurerCol. Sinclair, A.G.M.James H. Thorne, Dep. Prov. Sec. and Chief Clerk MINISTERSRev. John B. Woods, St. Peter’s ChurchRev. O. M. Grindon, English Church BARRISTERSJ.W. Johnston, Junr, Office, HalifaxAlexander James, Office, HalifaxJ. G. Foster, Office, Halifax PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONST.B. Des Brisay, M.D., corner of King and Quarrel stsR.S. Campbell, M.D., {Dealer in Patent Medicines, Paints, Oils, &c.L.E. Van Buskirk, M.D.W.H. Weeks, King Street MERCHANTSAllan, J.W, Grocer and Dealer in LumberBrown, J.C, {General Dealer in Groceries and Liquors, &c.Bettinsen, J, Groceries and Boarding HouseElliott, J.B., …

Dartmouth Business Directory, 1864 More…

“THE first enumeration of the people in what is now the Dominion of Canada was made at Port Royal in 1605 by De Monts’s band of settlers. The returns of this census are still extant. Not until 1671, however, was the first regular census taken in Acadia, showing a population of 441” “At the time of Confederation the Maritime Provinces were almost entirely rural. St. John and Halifax had populations considerably over twenty thousand; Charlottetown had eight thousand; while Fredericton had six thousand. There were no other towns with over three thousand inhabitants, and only Truro, Dartmouth, Windsor, Pictou, Liverpool, …

Population Shifts in the Maritime Provinces More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: The Dominion decennial census of 1911 gave Dartmouth’s population at 5,058. In February of that year, two-roomed Victoria School was opened at the southeast corner of Wyse Road and Common Road. The new ferry-steamer “Halifax” was launched in Scotland. Daniel Brennan commenced the first automobile-bus service around Dartmouth and also ran trips to Cow Bay Beach. In a short time, he abandoned the venture. Many Dartmouthians saw their first airship flights at the Provincial Exhibition. Sir Wilfrid Laurier campaigned in Halifax for the Dominion elections. The big issue was reciprocity with …

1911 More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: In January 1901 died Queen Victoria. Shops and public places everywhere were draped in mourning. At Dartmouth the school children were assembled one afternoon in the auditorium of St. Peter’s Hall where appropriate orations were delivered, and where many of those present sang for the last time the familiar anthem of four generations, “God Save the Queen”. At 18 Prince Street that winter died Postmaster John E. Leadley who had come from Windsor in 1864 to work at Symonds’ Foundry. Mr. Leadley afterwards operated an Inn at the present 19 Ochter-loney …

1901 More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: Dartmouth collected over $1,000 for the Springhill Mine Disaster fund in 1891. The Dominion decennial census gave our population as 6,252. The Statistical Year Book gave it as 4,576. Newspaper comment was that the first mentioned figure must have included the whole polling district, and the 4,576 was for Dartmouth municipality only. (Compare the 1881 and 1901 census.) Dartmouth professional speed skaters of that era included Charles Moore, “Si” Faulkner, “Bob” Patterson and George Misener, Some fast amateur skaters were Ted Graham, Bud Swaffer, Jack Warner, Arch Mosher, William Foston, Frank …

1891 More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: On January 29th, the fifth Sunday of the month in 1871, St. James’ Presbyterian Church was opened for the first services, and the new edifice was dedicated with appropriate ceremonies. On the next evening, the ladies of the congregation held their annual tea-meeting and salon in the basement hall where a large number of members and guests met in a “most successful housewarming,” according to the Presbyterian Witness. At the capitulation of Paris towards the close of the Franco-Prussian War in February, William Gar vie lectured on the beauties of that …

1871 More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: Queen Victoria was crowned on June 28th, and on that day celebrations were held in several centres of Nova Scotia. Crowds thronged to Halifax where the demonstrations started at dawn with salutes of cannon, music of bands and the joyous peal of church bells. The weather was glorious. All the principal shops were closed and shuttered, bunting billowed in the morning breeze and regal flags fluttered on church towers and other prominent places like Dalhousie College, then on the present location of City Hall. People in holiday attire kept wending their …

1838 More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: By 1761, the Mi’kmaq raids were at an end. After peace was made with the French in 1763, no more casualties seem to have occurred. The year 1765 must have brought considerable excitement to Dartmouth, for it was in the month of May that hangings occurred. A search through the Supreme Court files, however, shows that six men were sent to the gallows that spring. Mr. Mullane omitted the name of John Evans. All six gave their occupation as sailors, perhaps merchant seamen. Driscoll and Lawlor, convicted of murdering a man …

1760s More…