DARTMOUTH, Halifax County: This city is located on the east side of Halifax Harbour. A [Mi’kmaq] name was Boonamoogwaddy, “Tomcod ground.” The English name may have been given in honor of William Legge, Earl of Dartmouth, Colonial Secretary 1772-75, but it was probably named for the Devonshire port of Dartmouth. In August, 1750, the Alderney arrived in Halifax (Chebucto) Harbour with 353 settlers on board. On August 23 the Council resolved to settle them across the Harbour from Halifax. Before the end of 1750, a blockhouse and small military post had been built. In 1751 the settlers suffered from an [Indigenous] attack. After the American Revolution an oil factory was set up and operated by a Nantucket Whaling Company about 1785 to 1792. They built a meeting-house about 1787, and their little village near the factory became known as Quaker Town because most of the people were Quakers. Later most …

Place Names and Places of Nova Scotia (in Dartmouth Township) Read More…

“THE AUTHOR’S APOLOGY: This little messenger, presented to the public, is a collection of information gained from many of the oldest members of the Churches in the Association, where records were imperfectly kept, and, in many instances, none whatever. I am aware that every person who attempts a work of this kind is left open for public comment or criticism. And as I make not the faintest attempt to literary attainments, I must claim your sympathy. My simple aim is to place in the hands of every [Black] Baptist in Nova Scotia a copy of this little book, in order if possible to give them some idea of how it came about that there should be a Church built by one who had so shortly escaped from the ranks of slavery, fled from the house of bondage, and could attract so much attention and sympathy from a British public, as …

A brief history of the [Black] Baptists of Nova Scotia and their first organization as churches Read More…

“List of Contributors: … P. McNab, Dartmouth – barley and oats.” “On the east side of the harbor is situated the town of Dartmouth, settled in 1750. The town is well situated, and is admirably adapted to the employment of ship-building. It is connected with the city by steamboats.” “Prior to 1719 (at which time Annapolis was the seat of government) the management of the civil affairs of the province was vested solely in the Governor; and, in his absence, in the Lieutenant-Governor or the Commander-in-Chief. In 1719, Governor Phillips, who succeeded Mr. Nicholson, received instructions from the British Ministry to choose a Council from amongst the principal English inhabitants, and, until an Assembly could be formed, to regulate himself by the instructions of the Governor of Virginia. This Council was composed of twelve members, principally officers of the garrison and the public departments. The Governor and Council, from the …

Nova Scotia in 1862: papers relating to the two great exhibitions in London of that year Read More…

“The territorial distribution of the Nova Scotia government is – 1. Eastern division, 2. Middle; 3. Western; 4. Halifax; 5. Cape Breton; there are ten counties, some of which are again subdivided into districts and townships for the more convenient administration of justice. The only counties divided into districts are, Halifax into three, viz. Halifax, Colchester, and Pictou; and Sydney into Lower and Upper. The townships are not all of equal extent, nor of equal number in each county, viz. in Halifax there are Halifax, Dartmouth, Preston, and Lawrence Town (in Halifax District)…” “Halifax division, containing part of the county of the same name, and the townships of Haliax, Dartmouth, Preston and Lawrence Town, is thus presented in the last census: “The naval capital of British North America, Halifax, has been before described, and Dartmouth requires no separate account” Martin, Robert Montgomery, 1803?-1868. History of Nova Scotia, Cape Breton, the …

History of Nova Scotia, Cape Breton, the Sable Islands, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, the Bermudas, Newfoundland, &c., &c. Read More…

“Far be it from me to wish, on this occasion, to draw national distinctions. I desire rather to show you how the certainty that your descendants will be one race, having a common attachment to Nova Scotia, and knowing no higher obligation than to love and honor her, ought to draw you closer to each other in friendly union, and make you solicitous to give that direction to their minds which shall best secure their happiness, and promote the welfare of their common country.” “…from Virginia, with her 66,000 square miles, covered with flourishing towns and more than a million population – from New York, with her magnificent rivers, princely cities, and two millions of people – from Massachusetts, with her extensive border crowded with activity and intelligence – from the Canadas, with their national dimensions, great natural resources, and rapidly increasing population – to our own little province, hemmed …

An address delivered before the Halifax Mechanics’ Institute on the 5th November, 1834 by Joseph Howe Read More…

“This free port bill, as it concerned Nova Scotia, was for several years confined to the port of Halifax, and proved very unequal and unjust in its operation; as all foreign flour legally imported must come through Halifax, which subjected the people of the outports and country generally not only to pay the five shillings duty, but to double freight with the profits, commissions, storage, wharfage, truckage, &c. on nearly all the bread stuff we consumed; and often the flour, which in Baltimore, Alexandria, Richmond, and other sea ports of the middle States, was purchased for five or six dollars a barrel, was sold to the consumer in the outports of the Province for nearly double the first cost. This caused a general discontent and murmuring, and acted as a direct bounty on illicit trade; many sober reflecting men, who would otherwise have scorned to have anything to do with …

A brief sketch of the present state of the province of Nova-Scotia Read More…

“The baronetage, which forms a distinct estate of nobility in the British empire, intermediate between the peerage and knighthood, was erected by his majesty king James I by Charter under the great seal, on the 22nd of May, 1611” roun, R. (Richard), Sir, 1801-1858. Case of the Honourable the Baronets of Scotland And Nova Scotia: Shewing Their Rights And Privileges, Dignatorial And Territorial. Edinburgh: W. Blackwood, 1836. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/aeu.ark:/13960/t2d80df70

“One or two ships are generally building on the slips at Dartmouth, on the opposite side of the harbor, varying from one to four hundred tons…” “An ingenious and simple plan was proposed, towards the close of the last war, for constructing a dock immediately opposite the yard on the Dartmouth shore, where a little cove and ravine offer two sides of a natural basin which was to be formed into a double dock, supplied by the means of the rivulet. I know not why this plan was not adopted.” “About forty years ago, a turnpike-gate erected within ten miles of Halifax was pulled down by the people.” “The Legislature is very liberal in granting pecuniary aid to private undertakings which embrace public utility; for instance, a carriage ferry from Halifax to Dartmouth, in the hands of a few individuals, is annually subsidized from the treasury… In some instances, it …

Letters from Nova Scotia: comprising sketches of a young country Read More…

Eagar, William. “Halifax, from the Red Mill, Dartmouth” 1839. Lithograph on India paper laid down on wove paper. Laid down on cardboard https://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/detail.jsp?Entt=RDMDC-JRR2174&R=DC-JRR2174

The harbor mouth is seen directly ahead, George’s Island to the right, with Point Pleasant at the extreme right. To the left in the distance is McNabs Island, and the Dartmouth shore can be seen at extreme left. The church in the middle of the scene is likely Christ Church, the view looks to be from near Thistle Street and Victoria Road today. Mercer, Alexander Cavalie. “Halifax Harbour from Dartmouth Common”. 1838. Watercolour over pencil on wove paper. https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/CollectionSearch/Pages/record.aspx?app=FonAndCol&IdNumber=2834032

This view appears to be from the vicinity of Tuft’s Cove. Citadel Hill is seen in the distance in the middle of the piece, the harbor mouth to the left. To the left of the harbor is a point on the Dartmouth shore, which appears to be the foot of Lyle Street, where the MacDonald Bridge crosses today. Petley, Robert. “View of Halifax from the Indian Encampment at Dartmouth”. 1837. Lithograph with hand coloring on wove paper. https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/CollectionSearch/Pages/record.aspx?app=FonAndCol&IdNumber=2837358 Also: Petley, Robert. “View of Halifax. / from the Indian Encampment at Dartmouth.” 1837. Lithograph on India paper laid down on wove paper. Laid down on cardboard https://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/detail.jsp?Entt=RDMDC-JRR2208&R=DC-JRR2208

“The man who resides in Dartmouth complains that he has but one vote, while the man at this side of the harbor (Halifax) has two. An attempt has been made to rearrange the representation, but the attempt failed. We had not the courage or the impartiality to follow out a better system, and to equalize the elective privileges…” Howe, Joseph. Annand, William. Chisholm, Joseph Andrew. “The Speeches and Public Letters of Joseph Howe” Halifax, Canada: The Chronicle publishing company, 1909. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc2.ark:/13960/t87h1hh71?urlappend=%3Bseq=210

“East side of Bedford Basin: The winding shore above the narrows has many picturesque points and coves to recommend it to the lover of natural scenery. It has also historical associations, but not, perhaps, of such prominence as that of the western side. High hills, clad with pine and spruce, rise conspicuously above the sparkling waters, affording wide views of the city and harbor of Halifax. Tuft’s Cove, which was named after Gerisham Tufts, who belonged to a family extensively known in the United States, was the first to obtain a grant of the land surrounding this cove. The impression prevailed that he belonged to New England and came to Halifax early in the settlement of the town. The land above the Tufts property was granted to Ezekiel Gilman. He was one of the two army majors, retired, that accompanied the first settlers to Halifax. Leonard Lochman, after whom Lockman …

Footprints Around and About Bedford Basin Read More…

On moving the eleventh resolution, on the 3rd of March (1837), Mr. Howe made a speech that is worth preserving, for various reasons. Those who defended the old system of government assumed, first, that the institutions of the United States had failed to secure liberty and happiness, and that by yielding responsible government, republican institutions would be at once introduced. Mr. Howe combated both these arguments. While he did justice to our neighbours, and ascribed to the practical working of their purely elective institutions the great prosperity and freedom which they enjoyed, he showed that responsible government was not republicanism, but a purely British mode of conducting public affairs, which British Americans might claim without any impeachment of their loyalty: “In rising to move the last resolution, while I congratulate the House on having got so nearly through the series, I must also thank them for the patient attention with …

Speech on Elective Councils (Senate) Read More…

“The colonies now belonging to the Crown of Great Britain, exclusive of those under the government of the East India Company, (to which this work does not profess to extend,) are as follows: In the West Indies and South America: Antigua, including Barbuda Barbadoes British Guiana Dominica Grenada Jamaica Montserrat Navis St. Christopher’s, including Anguilla St. Lucia St. Vincent Tobago Trinidad Virgin Islands In North America, continental and insular: Bahama Islands The Bermuda, or Somer’s Islands Canada, Lower Canada, Upper Prince Edward’s Island New Brunswick Newfoundland, with part of Labrador Nova Scotia, including Cape Breton Africa: Cape of Good Hope Sierra Leone, with the settlements on the Gold Coast In the Indian Seas: Ceylon Mauritius, with the Seychelles In the South Seas: New South Wales, with Norfolk Island Van Dieman’s Land Western Australia (In this enumeration of the colonies nothing has been said of Honduras, which has been decided expressly …

A summary of colonial law Read More…

“The beauty and the safety of this (Halifax) harbor attracted the notice of speculators at a very early period, and many applications were at different times made, for a grant of land in its vicinity. The famous projector, Captain Coram, was engaged in 1718, in a scheme for settling here; and a petition was presented by Sir Alexander Cairn, James Douglas, and Joshua Gee, in behalf of themselves and others, praying for a grant upon the sea coast, five leagues S.W. and five leagues N.W. of Chebucto, upon condition of building a town, improving the country around it, be raising hemp, making pitch, tar and turpentine, and of settling two hundred families upon it within three years. This petition received a favorable report from the Lords of Trade; but as it was opposed by the Massachusetts’s agents, on account of a clause restricting the fishery, it was rejected by the …

An historical and statistical account of Nova Scotia Read More…

“Above 70 years’ legislation has accumulated a mass of provincial enactments (contained in 3 large quarto volumes, down to 1826.) Since 1826, very many acts have passed. Much inconvenience has been felt in referring to them, as it requires intimate acquaintance with their contents, to enable any one to distinguish those directly or virtually repealed, from such as remain in force. This difficulty has been experienced by professional men as well as others, although the small Index published by Chief Justice Marshall afforded some remedy. The variety of instances in which our Provincial acts and usages have altered the laws of England, and the uncertainty as to what English acts are or are not in force here, suggested to the writer the usefulness of such a work in humble imitation of the Commentaries of Blackstone, retaining such English law as we have adopted, and adding under each head or chapter …

Epitome of the laws of Nova Scotia (Volume 1-4) Read More…

“With regard to our Magistrates, although in general selected from the most suitable persons, yet the greater number, as may reasonably be supposed, are but of ordinary education and attainments, and nearly all, from necessity, being actively engaged in private avocations, they have but little leisure for the acquisition of any particular knowledge of the laws. Moreover, with most of them, the means for obtaining that knowledge are extremely limited. The English Works on the office of a Justice of the Peace, are in general voluminous and expensive, and can hut rarely be procured in this country; and, comparatively, but a small part of them are of any practical use to our Magistrates, especially with reference to any Provincial enactments. No publication for their general in-formation and guidance has yet been afforded in the colony.. The work by Mr. Murdoch, although valuable and generally useful, has, evidently, not been designed …

The justice of the peace, and county and township officer in the province of Nova Scotia (1837) Read More…

1746-1799 Duc d’Anville arrived at Chebucto, 10 Sept 1746 Halifax founded, 21 June 1749 [Indigenous people] attacked 6 men at Maj. Gilman’s saw-mill, Dartmouth Cove, killing 4, 30 Sept 1749 Saw-mill let to Capt. Wm. Clapham, 1750 Alderney arrived from Europe with 353 settlers, Aug. 1750 Town of Dartmouth laid out for the Alderney emigrants, Autumn 1750 Order issued relative to guard at Dartmouth, 31 Dec. 1750 Sergeant and 10 or 12 men ordered to mount guard during the nights at the Blockhouse, Dartmouth, 23 Feb. 1751 [Indigenous people] attacked Dartmouth, killing a number of the inhabitants, 13 May, 1751 German emigrants arrived at Halifax and were employed in picketing the back of Dartmouth, July 1751 Ferry established between Dartmouth and Halifax, John Connor, ferryman, 3 Feb. 1752 Mill at Dartmouth sold to Maj. Ezekiel Gilman, June 1752 Population of Dartmouth 193, or 53 families, July 1752 Advertisement ordered for …

Chronological Table of Dartmouth, Preston, and Lawrencetown Read More…