“Then there is Howe, who was prosecuted by the corrupt magistrates whom he exposed in his day. By the way, he successfully defended himself, and I hope to perhaps follow his glorious example. He is now proclaimed as Nova Scotia’s noblest son.” — FJ. Dixon, 1920 “When they tried Joseph Howe for sedition, they erected a monument to him in the shadow of the County jail [sic: Province House yard].” — J.B. McLachlan, 1924 “I am not a prophet, nor the son of a prophet, but I tell you that what happened to Howe will happen to McLachlan.” — J.S. …

Howe (1835), Dixon (1920) and McLachlan (1923): Comparative Perspectives on the Legal History of Sedition More…

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CONFEDERATION(To the Editor of the Star).SIR,-Although I have not yet seen the pamphlet published by Mr. Howe, in opposition to the proposed confederation of the British North American Provinces, you will, I hope, permit me to correct several misstatements of facts into which you have inadvertently been betrayed, by the perusal of Mr. Howe’s brochure, in your article in the “Star” of the 21st inst., upon a question involving the most important consequences, both to British North America and the Parent State. A scheme of confederation, providing for the Union of the British North American provinces under one Government and …

Dr. Tupper’s Letter More…

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BUSINESS DIRECTORY FOR DARTMOUTH.OFFICIALS Hon. J.W. Johnston, Judge in EquityHon. Joseph Howe, Commissioner of FisheriesLawrence Hartshorne, City TreasurerCol. Sinclair, A.G.M.James H. Thorne, Dep. Prov. Sec. and Chief Clerk MINISTERSRev. John B. Woods, St. Peter’s ChurchRev. O. M. Grindon, English Church BARRISTERSJ.W. Johnston, Junr, Office, HalifaxAlexander James, Office, HalifaxJ. G. Foster, Office, Halifax PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONST.B. Des Brisay, M.D., corner of King and Quarrel stsR.S. Campbell, M.D., {Dealer in Patent Medicines, Paints, Oils, &c.L.E. Van Buskirk, M.D.W.H. Weeks, King Street MERCHANTSAllan, J.W, Grocer and Dealer in LumberBrown, J.C, {General Dealer in Groceries and Liquors, &c.Bettinsen, J, Groceries and Boarding HouseElliott, J.B., …

Dartmouth Business Directory, 1864 More…

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“Writing in the posthumously published final version of his historical chronicle of early Halifax town, lawyer-archivist Thomas Beamish Akins condemned the infamous 1820 state trial, R. v. Wilkie, in these memorable words: An anonymous pamphlet was published from the press of A.H. [Anthony Henry] Holland, charging the magistrates of the town with malpractices, which caused much excitement. It was discovered to have been written by Mr. William Wilkie, of Halifax. He was indicted for libel, tried at the Easter term of the Supreme Court [17 April 1820] and sentenced to two years imprisonment with hard labor in the House of …

Sedition in Nova Scotia: R. v. Wilkie (1820) and the Incontestable Illegality of Seditious Libel before R. v. Howe (1835) More…

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“Nova Scotia had found [in Joseph Howe] not only its John Wilkes but also its Charles James Fox.” — W.S. MacNutt, 1965 “In a seminal article published in 1974, Kenneth McNaught described Howe as one of Canada’s “two most significant cases involving political freedom of the press” — the other being Dixon for seditious libel arising from the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919. McNaught failed to mention an important early New Brunswick case (Hooper, 1830), where the proprietor-editor of the British Colonist (Saint John) was prosecuted for seditious libel after publishing, under the author’s suggestive Puritan nom-de-plume (“Hampden”), a letter …

Sedition In Nova Scotia: R. v. Howe and the “Contested Legality” of Seditious Libel More…

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THE HON. JUDGE PATTERSON “UNDER the above title Mr. Laurence J. Burpee has edited and published a series of letters written by Howe while in England in 1866-7, opposing the passage of the British North America Act, to William J. Stairs, one of the Vice Presidents of the League. Howe was himself the President, and its Constitution which Mr. Burpee gives in an Appendix is unmistakably his work. In expressing his thought in crisp sentences, where every word tells, there was in Nova Scotia no one aut similis aut secundus to the great Tribune.” “True to its claim to represent …

Joseph Howe and the Anti-Confederation League More…

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“In 1822 public subscription libraries had been opened in Yarmouth and Pictou, preceding by only twelve years those literary and scientific societies which were established in both places in 1834. In 1824, the Halifax Public Library appeared; and in 1831 the Mechanics’ Library and Institute. The first lecture in the Institute was given in January, 1832; and, during the next quarter of a century, every phase of literature and science was discussed in this institute, which might well have been called the University of Halifax. From the parent organization branches spread to Dartmouth, Upper Stewiacke and Truro.” “Rather, it seems …

The Intellectual Awakening of Nova Scotia More…

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“Though Murdoch was a lawyer by profession and for several years a successful practitioner at the Bar, his tastes were essentially literary and historical . It was as a scholar and a gentleman that he impressed his contemporaries . One of these writing in the Acadian Recorder of October 11, 1863, under the pseudonym of Max, gives a very sympathetic view of Murdoch in contrast to other lawyers of his day. He describes him as, not tall, with a finely moulded head, considerably bald, soft hazel eyes, a kindly intelligent face, and a mouth that has “a peculiar twist while …

Nova Scotia’s Blackstone More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In January 1872 Dartmouth purchased a second-hand Hand Fire Engine in St. John, N. B., which went into service here after considerable repair work was done at Adam McKay’s boiler shop. R. B. Morris of the yirginia Tobacco Company (page 58) instituted a series of winter lectures at his factory on Church Street for the cultural improvement of employees and their families. Results of trotting races at the Dartmouth Lakes together with names of officials appeared in the “Halifax Citizen” in February. The list includes names of well known horsemen …

1872 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: The decade of the 1870s commenced with a boom in real estate which petered out after a few years of prosperity. One project attempted was the subdividing of about 100 acres of the virgin land of Mount Amelia where streets were laid out, and building lots surveyed. The promoters were Hon. James W. Johnston, Dr. Parker, John Esdaile, B. H. Hornsby, and others who became a corporate body in 1870 known as the proprietors of Prince Arthur Park. In that year, Mr. Esdaile built the first house. Except for the …

1870 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Ever since his meeting with Sir John A. Macdonald in August, Joseph Howe evidently had carried on further correspondence with the Prime Minister at Ottawa regarding “Better Terms” for Nova Scotia. As has been previously stated, much thought and anxiety about this matter was experienced by Howe at Fairfield where he must often have mulled over the situation before making perhaps the most important decision of his whole political career. Early in 1869 he left for Ottawa. The news broke on January 30th when a dispatch from the Capital announced …

1869 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: As the people of Nova Scotia had voted so overwhelmingly against Confederation at the polls, one of the first acts of the new House of Assembly in 1868 was to send a delegation to London praying for a repeal of the B.N.A. Act as far as it regarded this Province. Although Joseph Howe was a member of the House of Commons at Ottawa, he was nevertheless among the number selected. Dr. Charles Tupper, also a member of the Federal Parliament, likewise went to England to use his influence in favor …

1868 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: The year 1866 opened with a sharp spell of weather. On January 8th the thermometer at Citadel Hill registered 20 below zero. On February 2nd, Henry Y. Mott, former political partner of Joseph Howe, died in his 69th year at his residence near the brickyard mentioned on page 113. William Condran, born in 1859, well remembered the funeral procession passing his home*, and often told me that it was the longest ever seen in Dartmouth up to that time. The Starr Manufacturing Co. were now exporting their newly invented Acme …

1866 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: By mid-January of 1865 the new ferry “Chebucto” was ready for launching. Customary preparations were made and the town school children invited to be present at the ceremony. But they all arrived too late. Ex-Ferry Superintendent Charles Pearce once told me the story. The latter’s grandfather, Abraham Pearce, and his assistants, were working below decks preparatory to the launching, and their hammering against the joists and sides caused such a jarring that the boat started to slide and could not be stopped. She actually launched herself. Mr. Pearce further stated …

1865 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: From 1863 onward, lists of inhabitants in large settlements are available in Nova Scotia directories. For instance, we learn that among Dartmouth residents of 1863 were the two political giants, Hon. Joseph Howe and Hon. J. W. Johnston. Hon. Michael Tobin of the Legislative Council was living at “Brookhouse” in Woodlawn. Mrs. John Esson, whose late husband had won the 1859 election for Halifax East, was still residing at “Balmoral” at the extremity of Esson Road. Colonel Robert Bligh Sinclair, Adjutant General of the Militia of Nova Scotia, was then occupying …

1863 More…

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