More time is spent describing Dartmouth here than in many other similar books of its kind, yet another instance of 1756 being given as the date of Dartmouth’s “destruction” at the hands of the Mi’kmaq. The timing of the “attack”, 1756, in regards to the delay of the institution of representative government at Halifax until 1758; the requirement of a population of 25 qualified electors in 1757 in order to qualify for a representative in the legislature, which become 50 qualified electors by 1758; all these points, when put together, have always struck me as curious. Earlier events, such as the arrival and settlement of various “wastrels” as well as the “King’s bad bargains” has led me to question whether it was the Mi’kmaq who were involved in …

A Plan of National Colonization Read More…

DARTMOUTH, Halifax County: This city is located on the east side of Halifax Harbour. A [Mi’kmaq] name was Boonamoogwaddy, “Tomcod ground.” The English name may have been given in honor of William Legge, Earl of Dartmouth, Colonial Secretary 1772-75, but it was probably named for the Devonshire port of Dartmouth. In August, 1750, the Alderney arrived in Halifax (Chebucto) Harbour with 353 settlers on board. On August 23 the Council resolved to settle them across the Harbour from Halifax. Before the end of 1750, a blockhouse and small military post had been built. In 1751 the settlers suffered from an [Indigenous] attack. After the American Revolution an oil factory was set up and operated by a Nantucket Whaling Company about 1785 to 1792. They built a meeting-house about …

Place Names and Places of Nova Scotia (in Dartmouth Township) Read More…

“THE AUTHOR’S APOLOGY: This little messenger, presented to the public, is a collection of information gained from many of the oldest members of the Churches in the Association, where records were imperfectly kept, and, in many instances, none whatever. I am aware that every person who attempts a work of this kind is left open for public comment or criticism. And as I make not the faintest attempt to literary attainments, I must claim your sympathy. My simple aim is to place in the hands of every [Black] Baptist in Nova Scotia a copy of this little book, in order if possible to give them some idea of how it came about that there should be a Church built by one who had so shortly escaped from the …

A brief history of the [Black] Baptists of Nova Scotia and their first organization as churches Read More…

“List of Contributors: … P. McNab, Dartmouth – barley and oats.” “On the east side of the harbor is situated the town of Dartmouth, settled in 1750. The town is well situated, and is admirably adapted to the employment of ship-building. It is connected with the city by steamboats.” “Prior to 1719 (at which time Annapolis was the seat of government) the management of the civil affairs of the province was vested solely in the Governor; and, in his absence, in the Lieutenant-Governor or the Commander-in-Chief. In 1719, Governor Phillips, who succeeded Mr. Nicholson, received instructions from the British Ministry to choose a Council from amongst the principal English inhabitants, and, until an Assembly could be formed, to regulate himself by the instructions of the Governor of Virginia. …

Nova Scotia in 1862: papers relating to the two great exhibitions in London of that year Read More…

“It has so often happened to me in our own island, without traveling into those parts of Wales, Scotland, or Ireland, where they talk a perfectly distinct language, to encounter provincial dialects which it is difficult to comprehend, that I wonder at finding the people here so very English. If the metropolis of New England be a type of a large part of the United States, the industry of Sam Slick, and other writers, in collecting together so many diverting Americanisms and so much original slang, is truly great, or their inventive powers still greater.” “I never traveled in any country where my scientific pursuits seemed to be better understood, or were more zealously forwarded, than in Nova Scotia, although I went there almost without letters of introduction. …

Travels in North America, in the years 1841-2: with geological observations on the United States, Canada, and Nova Scotia Read More…

“The pages of this work are … compiled to show the origin of every barony, from its first commencement by writ of summons to parliament, to the time it became (as presumed) extinct, or terminated in an heir general in dormancy; or in coheirs general in abeyance between them; accompanied with such remarks as appear explanatory of their course of descent.” “Heralds and critics, that abusive throng; May as they please, speak of me right or wrong; Their praise will never give me any pride, Their spite, I heed not, and their snarls deride.” “In the Appendix to the second volume is an account of the first settlement of the Scots in Nova Scotia, the occupation of the country by them, and the institution of the Order of …

Baronia anglica concentrata, or, A concentrated account of all the baronies commonly called baronies in fee Read More…

“I learned… that there was a class of persons in Nova Scotia called the Blue Noses (so called from a kind of potato which thrives well here.) Whether this nick-name is an appropriate one or not, I did not become sufficiently acquainted with their habits to determine. This much however is true, that they are not in the habit of setting a very high value either on their own time or that of others.” “In spite of the large extent of barren and rocky land in the south, and what is a more serious evil, those seven or eight months of frost and snow, which crowd the labors of the agriculturalist into so brief a season, the resources of the province are very great.” “In this province the …

Sketches on a tour through the northern and eastern states, the Canadas & Nova Scotia Read More…

“Within the last six years, during all which time these wiseacres have been declaring that we were all going to the dogs, Halifax has grown one-third and Dartmouth has nearly doubled in size… Thirty miles of level main road have been made in the western part of the township… Turning to the east; its condition when I first visited it in 1837 was this; for fifty miles there was neither roads, bridges, magistrates nor schools. Now there are six schools dotting the shore, where formerly there was not one; magistrates have been appointed, and while the Great Eastern Road has been carried nearly to the bounds of our county, the shore settlements are becoming one after another closely connected by means of roads and bridges.” Howe, Joseph. Annand, …

Speech on Election, November 27 1843 Read More…

“When Halifax was first settled, this side of the harbor was the home and hunting ground of the [Mi’kmaq people]. Soon after the settlement of Halifax, Major Gillman built a saw mill in Dartmouth Cove on the stream flowing from the Dartmouth lakes. On September 30th 1749, the [Indigenous people] attacked and killed four and captured one out of six unarmed men who were cutting wood near Gillman’s mill. In August 1750, the Alderney, of 504 tons, arrived at Halifax with 353 immigrants, a town was laid out on the eastern side of the harbor in the autumn, given the name of Dartmouth, and granted as the home of these new settlers. A guard house and military fort was established at what is still known as Blockhouse hill. …

The story of Christ Church, Dartmouth Read More…

The timing of this address in favor of the “rights” of those who considered Nova Scotia their proprietary colony, in 1848, immediately after Nova Scotia had successfully won a measure of self government thanks to the efforts of Joseph Howe and others, says so much, and perhaps points to part of the impetus behind the obstinacy of the British Crown in regards to “confederation”. “As regards justice, the crown charters, of combined justice, policy, and humanity. acts of parliament, and other legal instruments founded upon (upwards of two hundred in number,) demonstrate, beyond all doubt or cavil, that the rights and privileges which they vest in the Order are still valid, subsisting, and effectual. The policy of restoring to activity and usefulness such a great monarchical institute as …

Committee of the Baronets of Scotland and Nova Scotia for Nova Scotia Rights. Read More…

“The greatest civil blessings which any people can enjoy, are a wise and just system of Laws, and their enlightened and faithful administration. On these, more than on any other political advantages, public prosperity and happiness must depend. But for securing this favorable result, these two advantages must unite. The first however excellent in itself, and pleasing as a matter of mere contemplation, is, when alone, insufficient for the purpose. It is, indeed, by the wise and vigilant application of such a system, not only that the happy effect is produced, but that the laws become the most generally known, and most truly appreciated. The inhabitants of this Colony, possess a very fair portion of the first of those blessings. Although some parts of our Legal Code will …

The justice of the peace, and county and township officer, in the province of Nova Scotia (1846) Read More…

For a few years the government of Nova Scotia was vested solely in a governor, who had command of the garrison stationed at the fort of Annapolis, known as Port Royal in the days of the French regime. In 1719 a commission was issued to Governor Phillips, who was authorized to appoint a council of not less than twelve persons, all of whom held office during pleasure. The governor, in his instructions, was ordered neither to augment nor diminish the number of the said council, nor suspend any of the members thereof, without good and sufficient cause… This council had advisory and judicial functions, but its legislative authority was of a very limited scope. Consequently the year 1758 is the commencement of a new epoch in the constitutional …

The Constitution of the Legislative Council of Nova Scotia Read More…

“Dartmouth was founded-in 1750, but in 1756 it was destroyed by the [Indigenous people]. In 1784 it was again settled by emigrants from Nantucket, most of whom removed in 1798. Since that time its population has gradually increased. The townships of this county-are Halifax, Dartmouth, Laurencetown (sic) and Preston. The first of these has two representatives in the Assembly.” Dawson, J.W. “A hand book of the geography and natural history of the province of Nova Scotia” Pictou [N.S.] : J. Dawson, 1848. https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.37346/34?r=0&s=1

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