DARTMOUTH, Halifax County: This city is located on the east side of Halifax Harbour. A [Mi’kmaq] name was Boonamoogwaddy, “Tomcod ground.” The English name may have been given in honor of William Legge, Earl of Dartmouth, Colonial Secretary 1772-75, but it was probably named for the Devonshire port of Dartmouth. In August, 1750, the Alderney arrived in Halifax (Chebucto) Harbour with 353 settlers on board. On August 23 the Council resolved to settle them across the Harbour from Halifax. Before the end of 1750, a blockhouse and small military post had been built. In 1751 the settlers suffered from an [Indigenous] attack. After the American Revolution an oil factory was set up and operated by a Nantucket Whaling Company about 1785 to 1792. They built a meeting-house about 1787, and their little village near the factory became known as Quaker Town because most of the people were Quakers. Later most …

Place Names and Places of Nova Scotia (in Dartmouth Township) Read More…

Mr. Bright: “Sir, about a month ago—on the 15th of May last—I presented a petition to the House from the representatives of the colony of Nova Scotia, and I now rise for the purpose of calling attention to that petition, and to statements made in it, and of proposing what appears to me to be a judicious course in regard to it. The Resolution which I have given Notice of consists of two parts—first, the statement of a fact which is easily proved; and, secondly, a statement of the mode in which the Government would do wisely to meet the difficult questions which have arisen. I am sorry to see that the right hon. Gentleman who has charge in this House of colonial affairs is not here; but in the course of my argument he may come upon that Bench. The petition which I presented to the House makes what …

Nova Scotia—British North American Confederation Read More…

“List of Contributors: … P. McNab, Dartmouth – barley and oats.” “On the east side of the harbor is situated the town of Dartmouth, settled in 1750. The town is well situated, and is admirably adapted to the employment of ship-building. It is connected with the city by steamboats.” “Prior to 1719 (at which time Annapolis was the seat of government) the management of the civil affairs of the province was vested solely in the Governor; and, in his absence, in the Lieutenant-Governor or the Commander-in-Chief. In 1719, Governor Phillips, who succeeded Mr. Nicholson, received instructions from the British Ministry to choose a Council from amongst the principal English inhabitants, and, until an Assembly could be formed, to regulate himself by the instructions of the Governor of Virginia. This Council was composed of twelve members, principally officers of the garrison and the public departments. The Governor and Council, from the …

Nova Scotia in 1862: papers relating to the two great exhibitions in London of that year Read More…

“We have witnessed the tremendous struggle and sacrifice made by our Republican neighbors, rather than suffer the disintegration of their common country.” “Nova Scotia, then, is a British Province, enjoying the priceless privilege of British laws, British connection, and a free Constitution.” “The consequence has been that our progress has been one incessant struggle, and the youth of our population, unable to find employment at home, have been obliged to seek it in a foreign country.” “It may be asked, in what respect will confederation affect this for the better? …It will strike down forever all inter-Provincial tariffs; every port in all the Provinces will admit productions of each, free of duty. An esprit, or pride of country, will be created.” “The port of Halifax will be the great point of entry for the Confederacy. It will be connected with every part of the continent by railway; it will be …

Confederation Considered On Its Merits: Being an Examination Into the Principle, Capabilities, And Terms of Union, As Applicable to Nova Scotia Read More…

“On the east side of the harbor opposite the city is situated the town of Dartmouth; between which places a semi-hourly communication is kept up by steam-boats.” Spedon, Andrew Learmont. Rambles Among the Blue-noses: Or, Reminiscences of a Tour Through New Brunswick And Nova Scotia During the Summer of 1862. Montreal: Lovell, 1863. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/umn.31951002286200x

“Every man who is invited or proposes to enter into any partnership or agreement, naturally thinks of the advantages and disadvantages it will involve or produce to himself.” Marshall, (Judge) John George. “Facts And Reasons Against New Brunswick And Nova Scotia Confederating With Canada: Addressed to the Electors of New Brunswick”. [S.l.: s.n., 1866. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/aeu.ark:/13960/t41r80t31

“Let me say in conclusion that I have not instigated these meetings. Every action taken in Nova Scotia will in some quarters be attributed to me, and we will be told that the feeling is the result of my organized agitation. I had scarcely got home to Dartmouth when I got an invitation to attend the meeting there. This meeting sprung from the simultaneous feeling of the community, and it would be a great mistake to suppose that that feeling, in all its depth and strength, originates in the intellectual action of one man. If I had been drowned on my passage from England, the electoral returns would hardly have been reduced by a single seat; if I were to die tomorrow the people of Nova Scotia would go on with steady, steadfast roll of thought in this highly intellectual struggle for freedom.” Howe, Joseph. Annand, William. Chisholm, Joseph Andrew. …

Speech in favor of repeal, January 13th, 1868 Read More…

In opposing the British North America Act… (Joseph Howe) always urged that it was not acceptable to the people of Nova Scotia. As an election was soon to be held, to make good his statement Mr. Howe felt that he must organize his forces, and demonstrate beyond dispute that the Province of Nova Scotia was overwhelmingly opposed to the union. He returned early in May, and on May 22nd delivered at Dartmouth the following speech, in which he betrays no loss of his old-time warmth and vigour: MEN OF DARTMOUTH -Never, since the [Indigenous people] came down the Shubenacadie Lakes in 1750, burnt the houses of the early settlers, and scalped or carried them captives to the woods, have the people upon this harbour been called upon to face circumstances so serious as those which confront them now. We may truly say, in the language of Burke, that “the high …

Speech at Dartmouth, May 22 1867 Read More…

(See also: https://cityofdartmouth.ca/nova-scotias-charter/) (Translated by the Rev, Carlos Slafter, A.M., of Dedham). JAMES, by the grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, ‘and Defender of the Faith, to all good men, clerical and lay, of his entire realm,—greeting. Know ye, that we have always been eager to embrace every opportunity to promote the honour and wealth of our Kingdom of Scotland, and think that no gain is easier or more safe, than what 1s made by planting new colonies in foreign and uncultivated regions where the means of living and food abound; especially, if these places were before without inhabitants or were settled by infidels whose conversion to the Christian faith most highly concerns the glory of God. But whilst many other Kingdoms, and not very long ago, our own England, to their praise, have given their names to new lands, which they have acquired and subdued …

Charter In Favor Of Sir William Alexander, Knight, Of The Lordship And Barony Of New Scotland In America Read More…

“Hon. Mr. Wilkins, Attorney General, moved the following resolutions on the subject of confederation, in the house of assembly, on the 5th of February: That the members of the Legislative assembly of this Province, elected in 1862 simply to legislate under the colonial constitution, had no authority to make or consent to any material change of such constitution, without first submitting the same to the people at the polls That the resolution of the 10th of April, which preceded the enactment of the British North America Act is as follows Whereas it is the opinion of this house it is desirable that a Confederation of the British North America Provinces should take place Resolved therefore that his excellency the Lieutenant Governor be authorized to appoint delegates to arrange with the imperial government a scheme of union which will effectually ensure just provision for the rights and interest of this province, …

Debate on resolutions relative to repeal of the “British North America Act” in the House of Assembly of Nova Scotia; session 1868 Read More…

For a few years the government of Nova Scotia was vested solely in a governor, who had command of the garrison stationed at the fort of Annapolis, known as Port Royal in the days of the French regime. In 1719 a commission was issued to Governor Phillips, who was authorized to appoint a council of not less than twelve persons, all of whom held office during pleasure. The governor, in his instructions, was ordered neither to augment nor diminish the number of the said council, nor suspend any of the members thereof, without good and sufficient cause… This council had advisory and judicial functions, but its legislative authority was of a very limited scope. Consequently the year 1758 is the commencement of a new epoch in the constitutional history of Nova Scotia. We find then from that time a civil government duly organized as in other English colonies of America, …

The Constitution of the Legislative Council of Nova Scotia Read More…

“Medals are awarded to Messrs. P. McNab, of Dartmouth, and H.M. Moyle, “for cereals of excellent quality.” It may appear singular that both should have a similar award for apparently similar products. It is to be understood that the two cases are not altogether parallel. Both exhibited wheat, barley, and oats – so that both were exhibitors of Cereals, – but McNab’s wheat was the best, while Moyle’s oats were the best…” Nova Scotia Committee for the Dublin International Exhibition. “Report of the Nova Scotia Department of the Dublin International Exhibition, 1865”, Halifax, N.S. : A. Grant, 1866. https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.40353/1?r=0&s=1

1746-1799 Duc d’Anville arrived at Chebucto, 10 Sept 1746 Halifax founded, 21 June 1749 [Indigenous people] attacked 6 men at Maj. Gilman’s saw-mill, Dartmouth Cove, killing 4, 30 Sept 1749 Saw-mill let to Capt. Wm. Clapham, 1750 Alderney arrived from Europe with 353 settlers, Aug. 1750 Town of Dartmouth laid out for the Alderney emigrants, Autumn 1750 Order issued relative to guard at Dartmouth, 31 Dec. 1750 Sergeant and 10 or 12 men ordered to mount guard during the nights at the Blockhouse, Dartmouth, 23 Feb. 1751 [Indigenous people] attacked Dartmouth, killing a number of the inhabitants, 13 May, 1751 German emigrants arrived at Halifax and were employed in picketing the back of Dartmouth, July 1751 Ferry established between Dartmouth and Halifax, John Connor, ferryman, 3 Feb. 1752 Mill at Dartmouth sold to Maj. Ezekiel Gilman, June 1752 Population of Dartmouth 193, or 53 families, July 1752 Advertisement ordered for …

Chronological Table of Dartmouth, Preston, and Lawrencetown Read More…

A particularly clear representation of the townships in Halifax County. As an aside, the Township of Dartmouth was seemingly “lost” around the time of the 1867 confederate coup otherwise known as “confederation”, which seems to have helped to spur the push for the incorporation of the Town of Dartmouth by 1873. What remained of the township of Dartmouth seemingly reverted to “Halifax County”, an entity “neither a corporation nor an individual capable of instituting proceedings”, according to Rigby Q.C., barrister for Dartmouth, as recently as 1880. The success of this case at the Supreme Court of Canada is mentioned in the Town’s Annual Report of 1886: https://cityofdartmouth.ca/annual-report-1886/

“The first municipal institution built to house the county’s poor and mentally ill was constructed in about 1887 in Cole Harbor.” https://www.memoryns.ca/halifax-n-s-county-halifax-county-home-and-mental-hospital

After piecing together several Crown land grant maps, you can see the path of the Old Annapolis Road much more clearly. Open the image in a new tab, to see it in more detail. Below you’ll find a few representations of the road as a contiguous route, as opposed to what is left recorded on the Crown Land Grant maps. (You can find find the individual Crown Land Grant maps here: https://novascotia.ca/natr/land/grantmap.asp) One of the first representations of the Old Annapolis Road, “Road markt out by Gov. Parr’s orders in 1784” One of the last representations of the Old Annapolis Road: Fifteen years later, by 1927 (perhaps because it wasn’t fit for automobile travel), the Old Annapolis Road disappears.

To the Editor of the Sun:Allow me through your valuable paper to make a few remarks upon an article which appeared in the “Citizen” this evening, with references to the dastardly murder of President Lincoln.The writer most unblushingly labors to lay the perpetration of this awful crime at the doors of what he terms the “radical Republican party,” saying that “these extremists clamor for the blood of every southerner, and the confiscation of all southern property,” and that they were deeply dissatisfied with the moderate policy lately foreshadowed by Lincoln and Seward.I would like to ask from what source the writer draws his valuable information. Do we not all know that the Northern people were filled with joy at the prospect of a speedy restoration of peace, and that the magnanimity which Mr. Lincoln has treated General Lee and his officers has not only met their most hearty acquiescence and greatest …

“…the dastardly murder of President Lincoln” Read More…

“A MOURNING NATIONACTION OF THE STATESFrom every point come to us dispatches expressing the deep and utter grief of the people over the loss of President Lincoln. Each city seems to vie with each other in the expression of its sadness. The mourning drapery of buildings is universal, and everywhere preparations are being made for the solemn obsequies. Orders and proclamations, State, municipal and military, are issued at every point, deploring the dreadful calamity, suspending public business, and directing measures in manifestation of the all-prevailing grief. Even from Canada and Nova Scotia come to us expressions of horror at the tragedy, and profound grief for the loss of the noble man who has been struck down. The language of grief is exhausted in the various dispatches that reach us. Says one: “Flags are all at half-mast, and every face wears an expression of sorrow and gloom.” Says another: “Profound grief …

“…deep sympathy for the nation’s loss” Read More…

BUSINESS DIRECTORY FOR DARTMOUTH.OFFICIALS Hon. J.W. Johnston, Judge in EquityHon. Joseph Howe, Commissioner of FisheriesLawrence Hartshorne, City TreasurerCol. Sinclair, A.G.M.James H. Thorne, Dep. Prov. Sec. and Chief Clerk MINISTERSRev. John B. Woods, St. Peter’s ChurchRev. O. M. Grindon, English Church BARRISTERSJ.W. Johnston, Junr, Office, HalifaxAlexander James, Office, HalifaxJ. G. Foster, Office, Halifax PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONST.B. Des Brisay, M.D., corner of King and Quarrel stsR.S. Campbell, M.D., {Dealer in Patent Medicines, Paints, Oils, &c.L.E. Van Buskirk, M.D.W.H. Weeks, King Street MERCHANTSAllan, J.W, Grocer and Dealer in LumberBrown, J.C, {General Dealer in Groceries and Liquors, &c.Bettinsen, J, Groceries and Boarding HouseElliott, J.B., & Co, Dealers in Dry GoodsElliot, Wm, {Soap and Candle Manufactory, and General Dealer in Groceries and Country ProduceElliott, J, & Son, {Dealers in all kinds of Building Materials; and. Carpenters and Builders Plans and Estimates furníshedFarrell, D, Dealer in Groceries and LumberFuller, J.A, {Of the firm of J. B. …

Dartmouth Business Directory, 1864 Read More…

From: Topographical township map of Halifax County, Nova Scotia / from actual surveys made, drawn, & engraved by and under the direction of H.F. Walling. Map of Nova Scotia and adjacent provinces, Creator: Walling, Henry Francis, 1825-1888, Publication Date: 1864, Map Publisher: A.F. Church and Co. https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agdm/id/14725/rec/1

From: Topographical township map of Halifax County, Nova Scotia / from actual surveys made, drawn, & engraved by and under the direction of H.F. Walling. Map of Nova Scotia and adjacent provinces, Creator: Walling, Henry Francis, 1825-1888, Publication Date: 1864, Map Publisher: A.F. Church and Co. https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agdm/id/14725/rec/1

“Disaster is frequently the parent of legislation. In surveying the long history of Nova Scotia, we find this saying particularly true.” “The first recorded instance of illness in Nova Scotia is the account of Champlain of an outbreak of scurvy at Port Royal in 1606. His group of settlers had spent the winter of 1605 at St. Croix Island, where, of a group of seventy-nine, forty-four died of scurvy. In Port Royal in the following year twelve of forty-five died.” “Of all the epidemics, that of smallpox carried with it the greatest destruction and terror. In 1694 an epidemic was present among the [Indigenous people] of Acadia, but we have no knowledge of the number dying as a result. We may be sure it was large, however…” “There was again an outbreak in Acadia in 1709 where there is evidence to suggest that the disease was of the haemorrhagic type. …

The Development of Public Health in Nova Scotia Read More…

“Skating was a favorite pastime with young and old, rich and poor. Besides Chocolate Lake, the Dartmouth Lakes, the Arm, and Bedford Basin there were many ponds near the city, most of which have vanished-Steele’s and the Quarry Ponds at Point Pleasant, the Egg Pond on the Common, two at Fort Needham and on the Rockhead property, and Stanford’s Ponds near James Stanford’s Tannery, and Bone Mill at Three Mile House, now Fairview. Prisoners were sent from Rockhead to clear snow from Griffin’s Pond, where it was the ambition of every boy to strap on the skates of some girl and take her for a spin in the moonlight” Blakeley, Phyllis R. “Halifax at the Time of Confederation” Dalhousie Review, Volume 27, Number 4, 1948 https://dalspace.library.dal.ca/bitstream/handle/10222/62543/dalrev_vol27_iss4_pp391_402.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y