“A number of highways led out of Halifax. The oldest was the Blue Bell Road which ran past a tavern of that name on what is now Windsor Street. This and the Lady Hammond Road · were reported to be in such a “very bad state” in January, 1824, that Sir James Kempt decided to build a new highway between them. The Kempt Road, as it was called, was henceforth the principal way to the country. Campbell Road, proposed as early as 1831 and laid out in 1836 when Sir Colin Campbell was Lieutenant-Governor, served only the northeast part of …

Halifax During and After the War of 1812 More…

“…About the year 1797, John Skerry began running a public ferry, and continued so employed until after the advent of the steam-boat company. He was familiarly known as “Skipper” Skerry, and a few of the oldest inhabitants still remember the man and speak of him in words of praise. The Dartmouth terminus of his ferry was directly at the foot of Ochterloney Street, and the Halifax landing was at the Market Slip. He occupied the building, which stood, on the south-east corner of Ochterloney and Water (Alderney Drive) Streets, and there kept a small bar. The second lot from the …

Ferryman John Skerry More…

Remember that time Dartmouthians got so fed up with the substandard ferry service offered by Haligonians, they charted their own course, and organized a committee that started a rebel ferry service? We do. A service that became so popular that the Haligonian run service was abandoned in favor of the people’s service. This group of rebels even organized a ferry boat buying expedition to the United States. “The Spirit of Dartmouth”, that’s what they should’ve named a county masquerading as a city’s new ferryboat 😉 (Pictured, Dartmouth’s Yankee sourced “The Annex” ferry, alongside a friend, the USS New Orleans – also, …

The Annex More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: In the winter of 1906 Ropework employees marched in a body to attend the funeral of Hon. William J. Stairs at Halifax. Mr. Stairs was the founder of their establishment, and the man whose spirit of enterprise and purpose was largely responsible for developing the northend of Dartmouth. Prior to the coming of Ropework families after 1868, there were vast areas of woods and pasture in that section of town paying only a few dollars taxes. Mr. Stairs also lived on our side of the harbor for several summers. At a …

1906 More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: On May 1st, 1890, our seven-member family moved from “Asylum Road’’ to the roomy Quaker-built house at Sterns’ corner. The front door was on Portland Street. The premises had just been vacated by Frank Mowatt, grocer. Downstairs in the shop my father sold candy, tobacco, hop beer and table beer on draught. We served oysters on the half-shell which cost about a dollar a barrel and yielded a handsome profit. On the western side of Water Street then ran a row of small buildings so that the house and one-chair tonsorial …

1890 More…