“Disaster is frequently the parent of legislation. In surveying the long history of Nova Scotia, we find this saying particularly true.” “The first recorded instance of illness in Nova Scotia is the account of Champlain of an outbreak of scurvy at Port Royal in 1606. His group of settlers had spent the winter of 1605 at St. Croix Island, where, of a group of seventy-nine, forty-four died of scurvy. In Port Royal in the following year twelve of forty-five died.” “Of all the epidemics, that of smallpox carried with it the greatest destruction and terror. In 1694 an epidemic was …

The Development of Public Health in Nova Scotia More…

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“The Telephone Utility is one of the oldest and largest public utilities, and perhaps the one which comes into direct contact with the most people in their workaday lives. The telephone was invented in 1876 by Alexander Graham Bell, a man well and favourably known in Nova Scotia, as during the last years of his life he made his home in Cape Breton, just outside of Baddeck. The first telephone in Halifax was installed in 1877, and the first actual commercial use of the service was at the Caledonia Mine, Cape Breton, also in the same year. At this time …

Public Utility Regulation in Nova Scotia More…

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Warden’s Address To the rate payers of the municipality of the Town of Dartmouth Ladies and Gentleman — It is my privilege to report to you the “state and condition of the Town” at the close of this the fourteenth year since civic government, under the Act of Incorporation, began. Before reporting on the different services under the management of the Council, permit me to congratulate you upon the success attained in the long-contested suit of the Queen vs, Dartmouth, a suit that probably has given the members of your Council in the past more care and trouble than all …

Annual Report 1886 More…

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Warden’s Address To the rate payers of the municipality of the Town of Dartmouth Ladies and Gentleman,— At the close of this my second term in the office of Warden, it is my duty and pleasure to report to you upon the state and condition of the Municipality of Dartmouth. This municipality has for so long a period been engaged in litigation, that it is with much satisfaction that I am enabled to report for the year 1887 there has been no suits by or against the same, and that the County Council decided not to appeal the “School Case.” …

Annual Report 1887 More…

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The following excerpts are from “Survival of an African Nova Scotian Community: Up the Avenue, Revisited” by Adrienne Lucas Sehatzadeh, 1998. An incredible resource of the Black history of Dartmouth that is certainly worth your time to read. “The part of Crichton Avenue above Lyngby Avenue is the area where the Black settlement started. Crichton Avenue winds its way north/south from the downtown area, along the western shore of Sullivan’s Pond and Lake Banook.” “Crichton Avenue has been a major roadway in Dartmouth for over 100 years and intersects Ochterloney Street in the downtown area, about one kilometre from Halifax …

The Avenue More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: On New Year’s Day 1889 the Dartmouth Public Reading Room opened in the long building near the Ferry. This beneficial institution was our first library. The Board of School Commissioners was organized that year, and had for its first members Councillors A. C. Johnston, C. E. Creighton, F. G. Dares, together with Dr. Frank Woodbury and C. H. Harvey. So also was the Dartmouth Park Commission which comprised Mayor Frederick Searfe, Councillors Alexander Lloy, W. H. Sterns, with J. Walter Allison and F. C. Elliot as Government appointees. Towards the …

1889 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In 1888 George E. McDonald came to Dartmouth as lineman and agent of the Bell Telephone Co., and set up the Exchange in his residence at 19 Edward Street. There were then some 30 telephones in use, including one at the Town Hall and another at Chief of Police McKenzie’s house above the lock-up. The latter instrument was mostly to receive fire calls. This innovation marked a great improvement over the established practice of messengers running on foot or galloping on horseback long distances whenever an alarm had to be …

1888 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Up to 1886 the Dartmouth civic year closed on April 30th. From 1887 onward it was changed to coincide with the calendar year ending on December 31st, and the Town elections were held on the first Tuesday of February instead of the first Tuesday of May as heretofore. In the February election of 1887 the first woman ever to poll a vote in Nova Scotia, voted at the Ward II polling booth in the Town Hall. Unfortunately the name of the lady is not preserved in local records but the …

1887 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: The first passenger service from Dartmouth’s new railway station, commenced on January 6th, 1886. E. M. Walker sent the first lot of freight. Connection was made at Halifax with inward and outward trains. The skating rink continued to be the centre of winter activity with hockey games, carnivals and skating contests. The Chebuctos, Mutuals and Knockabouts were the leading clubs. At Pictou in March, Henry Crowell of Dartmouth won the five-mile professional skating championship of America by defeating Hugh McCormack of St. John. Crowell’s victory was publicized in American sporting journals. …

1886 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In the winter of 1885, Dartmouth’s new rink attracted enthusiastic crowds to witness our first indoor hockey matches, and to participate in skating carnivals. The management put on three separate carnivals because the cold weather provided ice almost to the end of March. The steel drawbridge was swung into place, and in March the first locomotive crossed to Dartmouth and steamed down as far as Black Rock. In October the first trainload of sugar went out from Woodside Refinery consigned to Vancouver by an all – Canadian route. The Riel …

1885 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In 1884, Dartmouth along with other centres adopted Standard Time of the 60th meridian. Timepieces were advanced 14 minutes before noon on March 1st. Louis D. Robinson resigned as Principal of Schools, and was succeeded by H. S. Congdon. William Mac-Kenzie became Chief of the two-man police force, in place of Robert Lehan. Construction of the railway bridge at the Narrows began that spring. M. J. Hogan of Quebec was the contractor for the timber and trestle work shown on page 74. The Starr Manufacturing Company under the supervision of …

1884 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Ex-Councilor John F. Stairs of “Northbrook” became Warden of Dartmouth in May of 1883. In July he was elected to the Canadian House of Commons as one of the Conservative representatives for Halifax County. Never before nor since has a Dartmouth resident performed such a dual function. After twenty years of earnest effort on the part of George G. Dustan, construction of the Woodside Refinery was commenced that year. The cornerstone was laid on July 3rd by Mrs. Dustan at the northeast corner of the building. Granite from the Northwest …

1883 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In the winter of 1882 the dreaded smallpox made its appearance in the home of ex-Councillor Maurice Downey. One of his sons and a maid named Catherine O’Neil unexpectedly contracted the disease. Both died. Despite the fact that the Federal Government was now extending railway tracks from North Street to Cornwallis Street, and buying up Halifax waterfront property for a grain elevator and piers at Deep Water, Dartmouth people persisted in their efforts to obtain railway connection. At an expense of $101.24 they sent Warden John Y. Payzant and Councillor …

1882 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: The hopes of our citizens for a branch railway were greatly stimulated early in 1881 when information came from Ottawa that lengthy correspondence between Sir Charles Tupper, the Minister of Railways, and Sir Hugh Allan had been tabled in the House of Commons. The letters revealed that the Allan Line had proposed to the Government that if the latter extended the Intercolonial railway from Windsor Junction and erected the necessary terminus and depot at Dartmouth, then the Allan Line would spend about $250,000 on our side of the harbor. The …

1881 More…

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