“I hope the administration will see and be convinced that it is not a little faction, but the whole body of American freeholders from Nova Scotia to Georgia that now complain and apply for redress; And who, I am sure, will resist rather than submit.” Charles Thomson, secretary of the First Continental Congress, sent the petition of Congress on November 1st, 1774, to the British King George III, with this cover letter to Benjamin Franklin one of America’s agents in London. Thomson wrote that although there was still hope for peace, the colonies were on the “very edge of the …

The Edge of the Precipice More…

“When, therefore, the delegates at Philadelphia, in the preamble to their Bill of rights, and in their letter to his Excellency General Cage, stiled their body “a full and free representation of—” “all the colonies from Nova Scotia to Georgia,” they were guilty of a piece of impudence which was never equalled since the world began, and never will be exceeded while it shall continue.” “Now was the lucky time, the critical minute. Their passions were up, their reason disturbed, their judgment distorted; with the most inconsiderate rashness they took the fatal resolution of adopting approving and recommending the conduct …

From Nova Scotia to Georgia More…

Included for its mention of Nova Scotia, as a source of delegates who assembled, along with delegates from the other colonies, in a general Congress at Philadelphia (and as one of the “said colonies”, that “assembled in another Congress at Philadelphia”). This, in addition to other mentions of Nova Scotia as one of the colonies that partook in Congress, one by James Kent, American jurist, legal scholar and Chancellor of New York, in his “Commentaries of American Law“, and another by Samuel Seabury, the first American Episcopal bishop, in “The Congress Canvassed: Or, an Examination Into the Conduct of the …

Constitution of South Carolina: March 26, 1776 More…

(m.) Adml. Graves to Mr. Stephens (Boston, 19 Aug.).—Proceedings of the vessels of the squadron detailed. I enclose a copy of an affidavit sent me by Gov. Legge, which I do purposely to assure you that only what relates to H.M.’s schooner “Diligent” and the Philadelphian sloop is true. It is even suspected that the Philadelphian was intended for Machias, and not for Halifax, and that the story of her being taken away, like so many other false reports, is calculated to serve a particular purpose. Other details; also the reasons given by the rebels for an expedition to Nova …

George III: September 1775 More…

“Disaster is frequently the parent of legislation. In surveying the long history of Nova Scotia, we find this saying particularly true.” “The first recorded instance of illness in Nova Scotia is the account of Champlain of an outbreak of scurvy at Port Royal in 1606. His group of settlers had spent the winter of 1605 at St. Croix Island, where, of a group of seventy-nine, forty-four died of scurvy. In Port Royal in the following year twelve of forty-five died.” “Of all the epidemics, that of smallpox carried with it the greatest destruction and terror. In 1694 an epidemic was …

The Development of Public Health in Nova Scotia More…

“The New Englanders, moreover, were greatly dissatisfied with the Halifax government. Had not Francklin encouraged the Yorkshiremen to settle in the Isthmus? Furthermore, the New Englanders reacted violently to the fact that a small clique of Halifax merchants controlled the legislative and executive functions of government stubbornly refusing to grant to the New Englanders the right of ”township form of government” which Governor Lawrence had promised them in 1758 and 1759″ “What real impact did the Revolution have upon the inhabitants of Nova Scotia? Of course most of them resolved to adopt a policy of neutrality; many suffered because of …

The American Revolution and Nova Scotia Reconsidered More…

The disorders in the colonies do not seem to have been caused by the defects in the forms or constitutions of government. They have not prevailed in proportion as one has been under a more popular form of government than another. They must be attributed to a cause, common to all the colonies,—a loose, false, and absurd notion of the nature of government, spread by designing, artful men, setting bounds to the supreme authority, and admitting parts of the community, and even individuals, to judge when those bounds are exceeded, and to obey or disobey accordingly. These principles prevailing, there …

Disorders in the colonies More…

(bb.) Adml. Graves to Mr. Stephens.—Boston, 3 Oct. Receipt of letters acknowledged, and an account given of his further proceedings. The province of Nova Scotia contains many disaffected people, natives and New Englanders. I have reason to apprehend an attempt to destroy H.M.’s yard and stores, in which the rebels from the eastern parts of New Hampshire would be sure of assistance, not only from the town and country people, but even from the artificers of the yard, who are mostly of this province. It is, indeed, a very serious consideration that those employed in the yard are so intimately …

“Nova Scotia contains many disaffected people, natives and New Englanders” More…

Our couriers between Quebec and Montreal depart from hence twice a week. The letters they carry scarce defray the expense of the riding work; but, seeing that the conveniency of the posts weekly is felt by the mercantile body, and in short by the whole province, and saves the expense of many expresses to Government, I shall continue it as long as it does not bring the office in debt. In all probability we shall be shut out from all communications from any one part of the world after the middle of November until the middle of May, unless letters …

“There’s many Whigs (as they are called) in Nova Scotia” More…

(aa.) Admiral Graves to Mr. Stephens, Boston, 18 May.—I find that the rebellion begun in Massachusetts Bay has spread itself to New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. There is too much reason to apprehend the infection is general, since even Nova Scotia has shown symptoms in burning a quantity of hay collected for the use of the troops. I submit, therefore, how extremely useful a few of the old fifty-gun ships would be to serve in the rivers of this continent, &c. Every day’s experience shows that we can hope for no supplies the rebels can prevent; their vigilance extends even …

Hay Party More…