“F: Village Dartmouth ou monte un bivac de 60 homes “Bivac“: “Term borrowed from German. Extraordinary guard which is made at night in the open air for the safety of a camp, a detachment, a post. Sleep at the bivac.” My rough translation: Dartmouth village, a camp made up of 60 men. “Plan de la baye et des ports de Chibouctou” 1751. https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b53089566v

One of the only representations I’ve seen of an island that supposedly existed in Dartmouth Cove, that is mentioned by Martin in the Story of Dartmouth on page 31: “There is an old tradition that in this part of Mill Cove, a small island used to exist. It is mentioned in a footnote to the History of Dartmouth by Harry Piers, who got the particulars from George Shiels, a lifelong resident who died about 1900. The latter stated that until the island had been washed away by the sea in the early part of the last century, it had been situated north of Mott’s Wharf. (Mott’s wharf ran out from the middle of the present Hazelhurst railway trestle, or about halfway between Evergreen point and Parker’s wharf). As the island disappeared under the action of the sea, according to Mr. Shiels, numerous wooden coffins containing skeletons could be seen. He …

Carte de la baye de Chibouctou Read More…

“THE AUTHOR’S APOLOGY THIS little messenger, presented to the public, is a collection of information gained from many of the oldest members of the Churches in the Association, where records were imperfectly kept, and, in many instances, none whatever. I am aware that every person who attempts a work of this kind is left open for public comment or criticism. And as I make not the faintest attempt to literary attainments, I must claim your sympathy. My simple aim is to place in the hands of every [Black] Baptist in Nova Scotia a copy of this little book, in order if possible to give them some idea of how it came about that there should be a Church built by one who had so shortly escaped from the ranks of slavery, fled from the house of bondage, and could attract so much attention and sympathy from a British public, as …

A brief history of the [Black] Baptists of Nova Scotia and their first organization as churches Read More…

“With the outbreak of the American Revolution, colonial leaders asserted their claims to the lands beyond the Alleghenies. Congress in its treaty plan of September, 1776, anticipated the acquisition of Canada, Nova Scotia, Florida, and all other British possessions on the North American continent.” “Congress’s special committee to consider foreign affairs issued its initial report on February 23, 1779. This report delineated a northern line running from Nova Scotia to Lake Nipissing, then west to the Missisippi.” “Clearly the critical decision for peace would be made in London because Britain alone could offer the essential concessions. The battle of Yorktown in October, 1781, convinced the ministry of Lord North that it could no longer continue the war in America. Still Lord North, backed by the king, refused to yield to American rebels. North resigned in March, 1782… Lord Rockingham and the earl of Shelburne, both moderates in their views towards …

The Illinois Country and the Treaty of Paris of 1783 Read More…

“The constitution of Nova Scotia is a representative provincial government. The Lieutenant-Governor, who is subordinate to the Governor-General of British North America, is commander within the province; and the supreme civil as well as military authority under him, is a council of twelve members, of whom the bishop and chief justice are members ex officio, and the rest appointed by the Crown. The legislative assembly consists of a body of forty-one members, elected by 40s. freeholders. It is elected, like the British House of Commons, for seven years, but may be prorogued or dissolved by the Lieutenant-Governor. It meets every year, and all money bills must originate in this assembly; other bills require the consent of the Governor and council before they become law. For the purposes of election, Nova Scotia is divided into ten counties. The counties have two members each, and the other representatives are returned by the …

Statistics Relative to Nova Scotia in 1851 Read More…

Dartmouth: 1478 Males, 1668 Females, Total population 3,155. Number of families 559, 492 Married, 1057 Single, 119 Widows. Deaf: M: 2, Blind: M: 2, F: 1. Cannot Read Above 15 years of Age: M: 214, F: 246 Cannot Write Above 15 years of Age: M: 228, F: 287 [Black] persons included in population: 197 [Indigenous people] not included in population: 34 By Origin: Dartmouth: Total Population: 3155, “Natives”: 2628, England: 107, Wales: 2, Scotland: 78, Ireland: 205, Guernsey: 1, Jersey: 4, Canada: 13, New Brunswick: 29, Newfoundland: 18, Prince Edward Island: 2, West Indies: 10, United States of America: 45, France: 1, Italy: 1, Other peoples in the Mediterranean: 7, Germany: 2, East Indies: 1, All other places: 1. By Religion: Church of England: 1115, Church of Rome: 807, Church of Scotland: 118, Presbyterian Church of L.P.: 414, Baptists: 408, Wesleyan Methodists: 168, Congregationalists: 8, Universalists: 98, Sandemanians: 10, Bible …

Census, Township of Dartmouth, 1861 Read More…

“Catalogue: Acts of the Parliament (sic) of Virginia, 1660 to 1748, Annals of Congress from 1789 to 1797, Assembly Journals of New York 1850 to 1855, Assembly Documents of New York 1850 to 1855, Senate Journals of New York 1850 to 1855, Senate documents of New York 1850 to 1855, Chalmer’s Introduction to the History of the Revolt of the American Colonies, Colonial History of New York, DeTocqueville’s Democracy in America, Dixon’s Life of William Penn, Documentary History of New York, Documents relating to the colonial History of New York-vol. 1-9 (except vol. 2), Journals of Provincial Congress of New York, 1775-1776–1777, Laws of New York from 1691 to 1773, Laws of New York from 1850-1855″ Acts of the Legislature of Virginia Resolution of the Convention of Virginia, authorising their delegates in Congress to declare American independence. Constitution of the United States. Declaration of independence. Articles of confederation. Declaration of …

Catalogue of books in the Legislative Council Library Read More…

“List of Contributors: … P. McNab, Dartmouth – barley and oats.” “On the east side of the harbor is situated the town of Dartmouth, settled in 1750. The town is well situated, and is admirably adapted to the employment of ship-building. It is connected with the city by steamboats.” “Prior to 1719 (at which time Annapolis was the seat of government) the management of the civil affairs of the province was vested solely in the Governor; and, in his absence, in the Lieutenant-Governor or the Commander-in-Chief. In 1719, Governor Phillips, who succeeded Mr. Nicholson, received instructions from the British Ministry to choose a Council from amongst the principal English inhabitants, and, until an Assembly could be formed, to regulate himself by the instructions of the Governor of Virginia. This Council was composed of twelve members, principally officers of the garrison and the public departments. The Governor and Council, from the …

Nova Scotia in 1862: papers relating to the two great exhibitions in London of that year Read More…

“I now come to THE GRAVE SITUATION IN NOVA SCOTIA. It is lamentable to think that in the twentieth year of Confederation there should be an appeal to the people on such a ground and with such a result as has just taken place in Nova Scotia, and I feel bound to point out, in the interest of the Confederation and of our future as a country some of the causes which, as I conceive, have led to that unhappy and humiliating event. To do so satisfactorily would require me to discuss fully the questions of the tariff, the debt, the taxation, the expenditure, the question of reciprocity, the fisheries, and other subjects, which, in view of the historical sketch which I am obliged to give, there is no time to touch. I must turn back to THE EVENTS WHICH PRECEDED CONFEDERATION and recall your attention to this fact, that …

…the Nova Scotia difficulty Read More…

“Reports of Inspectors of Schools: Dartmouth has provided a house, in the north end, with two departments. The site is retired, dry and pleasant, surrounded with forest trees. What has been known as Tuft’s Cove school occupies one of the rooms. The “Greenvale” house has four large and well ventilated rooms. The basement is well planned and arranged for play rooms in wet weather. The site is admirable. It would take many years for the newly planted trees to assume the stateliness and beauty of the trees which surround this building. In fifteen of the school-rooms in Dartmouth the pupils are saved from the effects of stair climbing, which has been pronounced “evil, and only evil, and that continually.”” “Halifax County has sections among the [Black] population; 5 of these have school houses which answer fairly well for the summer term, and we hope to have two more added for …

Annual report of the Department of Education 1890-91 Read More…

You’ll have to excuse the antiquated language, but a beautiful sentiment nonetheless that was worth sharing, “to guard and cherish our social rights.” I love finding examples of agency and the spirit of community that this exemplifies. “We, the Colored Men of Nova Scotia, have unanimously agreed to form ourselves into an Association to guard and cherish our social rights, and advance our Financial as well as our Political interests” Anglo-African Mutual Improvement and Aid Association of Nova Scotia. Constitution And By-laws of the Anglo-African Mutual Improvement And Aid Association of Nova Scotia. [Halifax, N.S.?: s.n., 18. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/aeu.ark:/13960/t7dr4207r

“If the prophet had spent the forenoon in walking the streets of this town counting the liquor shops, and the afternoon in the Town Hall reading the names on the license petitions, he could not have described the traffic, and the part which the better thinking portion of our citizens take in it, in more fitting words than those of the text, “Who justify the wicked for reward.”” “There are eight men in this town selling by license, for which they pay fifty dollars each, this giving to the revenue $400. But now, on the other hand, what does it cost the town of Dartmouth to support the traffic? 1. Pauper’s bill $1,200; 2. To supporting County Prisons, $500; Salary of a second policeman, $500; Low estimate of charity given, $700; total, $2,900; all of which, or nearly all, we pay every year as the result of the rum traffic.” …

The evils of the liquor traffic, and our responsibility in reference thereto, a sermon preached in the Dartmouth Baptist Church on Sabbath evening, Oct. 29th 1882 Read More…

“To the law and to the testimony; if they speak not according to this word, it is because there is no light in them” Falconer, Alexander, 1837?-1911. Universalism Antiscriptural: a Sermon, Preached In St. James Church, Dartmouth, On Sabbath, March 14, 1875. [Halifax, N.S.?: s.n.], 1875. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/aeu.ark:/13960/t6tx3pj37