From Private Property to Public Resource: The Emergence of Administrative Control of Water in Nova Scotia

This is a fascinating essay, there must have been implications as it relates to Dartmouth even before it became the City of Lakes. It was expropriation on a broad scale, which encompassed every water body in the province except for small rivulets or brooks unsuitable for milling, mechanical, or power purposes. Dartmouth’s lakes, once “protected … Read more

French Prison: Near old Ferry Road, Dartmouth Cove, probably built about 1793, afterwards J. P. Mott & Co. soap factory

“Old French Prison, probably built about 1793, afterwards J.P. Mott & Co’s Soap Factory near Old Ferry Road, Dartmouth Cove, Dartmouth, N.S. View looking eastward. Photographed on the afternoon of June 13, 1929. Modern low addition (to the building) at east end. Addition by Mott, to original building at right.”

“Just a few years before its demolition. This historic building was erected in 1793 without additions [addition to the right was made by J.P. Mott & Company]. It was used as a barracks for French prisoners until September 1805. In John P. Mott’s time soap was made there. It was built into a bank of clay on property that originally contained a variety of slopes and hillocks.

The extensive bulldozing at Hazelhurst during 1946, completely obliterated its landmarks. The site of this 18th century prison is thought to be on the spot where stands the new residence at 59 Newcastle Street extension.

The view is looking eastwards towards the heights of Johnstone Avenue. In the skyline, one inch to the right of the roof, the tower of Blink Bonnie House rises out of a forest which until then was almost privative. Mount Amelia is at left. Mr. Harry Piers, late Curator of the Provincial museum, is seated in the middle of the group at left…”

“Blink Bonnie House”

“Large room for prisoners with parlor beyond of stairs to bedroom above. View looking west south west (back towards photo above) on the afternoon of June 13, 1929. From left to right: Modern addition on south side, Door to parlour, Stairs to bedroom, Door to parlour, Door to old stairs, main entrance (northern side).” https://archives.novascotia.ca/photocollection/archives/?ID=5306

“Parlour and dining room, with large room beyond for prisoners (seen directly above), view looking eastward (in the same direction as the photo seen at top), photographed on the afternoon of June 13, 1929. From left to right: Door to old stairs to kitchen, opening boarded over, at this side of door, Door with glass in upper part, Large room beyond door, Fire place, Door to old chamber.” https://archives.novascotia.ca/photocollection/archives/?ID=5308

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin:

“As enemy ships captured off the coast were usually brought to this port, their crews were quartered at Melville Island, or at [this] old prison …, or they were put on parole in private homes at Preston where they often worked for their keep….

The prison … seems to have had a section for hospital cases, and quite likely a surrounding enclosure where the interns could enjoy recreational activities.

[Prisoners sometimes attempted to escape] as a notice in one of the issues of the Royal Gazette during July 1805 showed …. One result of this getaway was that the next issue of slop-clothing for Dartmouth and Melville Island camps, had the initials “P.O.W.” prominently marked in red print on the back of the jackets, on the thigh of trousers and on the breast of shirts. Inside their shoes was the word “PRISONER”.”

“Dartmouth, Halifax Co.: French Prison: Near old Ferry Road, Dartmouth Cove, probably built about 1793, afterwards J. P. Mott & Co. soap factory”, 1929. https://archives.novascotia.ca/photocollection/archives/?ID=5307&Page=201742600

Topographic Map Nova Scotia – Uniacke Sheet and Chezzetcook Sheet No. 11

Lots of detail in this topographical map surveyed in 1920 and reprinted in 1946.

 

The path of the “Old Annapolis Road” can still be seen.

“Topographic Map Nova Scotia – Uniacke Sheet and Chezzetcook Sheet No. 11. Surveyed and Reproduced by the Geographical Section, General Staff, Department of National Defence. Surveyed 1920 reprinted 1946”, https://archives.novascotia.ca/african-heritage/archives/?ID=682

Acadia Sugar Refinery

Acadia Sugar Refinery under construction, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. 1883. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=215

Acadia Sugar Refinery under construction, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. 1883. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=216

Acadia Sugar Refinery under construction, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. 1883. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=217

Acadia Sugar Refinery under construction, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. 1883. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=218

Acadia Sugar Refinery under construction, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. 1883. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=219

Acadia Sugar Refinery under construction, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. 1883. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=223

Acadia Sugar Refinery under construction, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. 1883. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=234

Acadia Sugar Refinery under construction, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. 1883. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=236

Acadia Sugar Refinery, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, after the fire. February 1912. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=324

Acadia Sugar Refinery, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, after the fire. February 1912. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=324

Acadia Sugar Refinery, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=858

Acadia Sugar Refinery, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. (?) 1912-1927. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=858

Acadia Sugar Refinery. Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. After 1912 fire, before 1927. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=871

Acadia Sugar Refinery Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. https://archives.novascotia.ca/notman/archives/?ID=873

Ambling through Acadia

“Across the harbor from Halifax is Dartmouth, where there are numerous rope-works and dry-docks – a purely commercial and practical district; and two miles out of Dartmouth, at Woodside, the Acadia Sugar Refining Plant has extensive works. Pretty names, these two towns possess, but perhaps they don’t live up to them. Just as Cow Bay, … Read more

Halifax Harbor

dartmouth aerial

Part of Dartmouth, from Wyse Road west and north, seen at right. “Nova Scotia”, 1927. https://catalog.archives.gov/id/68155666

Fortifications (in Dartmouth)

Fort Duncan: Shown “dismantled” in Collyers military map of 1808. Commissioner Henry Duncan was at H.M Naval Yard in 1790 and 1793.

Blockhouse: 1750. Dartmouth picketed in, July 1751.

Gun: 1749.

Eastern Battery, Fort Clarence: 1754. Freestone tower there in Jan 1810 & in 1834. Tower removed about 1865, when new works were begun. Fort Clarence reconstructed 1865 to 1868 (Mil. recds). Site sold to Imperial Oil Co, 1927. Known as Eastern Battery in 1786.

“Halifax Fortifications”, 1928. https://archives.novascotia.ca/maps/archives/?ID=1443

Nova Scotia’s Charter

“In the Royal Charter granted in 1621 to Sir William Alexander lies the origin of Nova Scotia as a Province and of the name it bears. It is with the conditions leading up to this grant and consequent upon it, as well as with the Charter itself, that the present article is concerned.” “The grant … Read more

Institutionalizing Eugenics: Custody, Class, Gender And Education In Nova Scotia’s Response To The “Feeble-Minded”, 1890-1931

“Between 1890 and 1927 hundreds of Nova Scotian children and adults were identified as either feeble-minded or mentally deficient through investigations conducted by physicians and philanthropists in the province. The earliest of these studies were not commissioned by the provincial government but instead reflected the middle-class internalization of the eugenic discourse. Reformers, drawn often from … Read more

“A Clarion Call To Real Patriots The World Over”: The Curious Case of the Ku Klux Klan of Kanada in New Brunswick during the 1920s and 1930s

kkk kanada

“The Ku Klux Klan movement in New Brunswick in the 1920s and 1930s was part of a wave of anti-Catholicism in the Northeast. The supposedly American organization’s connections with local Protestants, such as the Orange Order and Conservative politicians, coupled with New Brunswick’s long history of anti-Catholicism, indicate that the Klan’s nativism was not foreign … Read more

Constitutional Questions in Nova Scotia. The Attorney-General of Nova Scotia v. The Legislative Council of Nova Scotia

“At Confederation the Conservative Government then in power in Nova Scotia had filled all the vacancies in the [Legislative] Council (of which there were a number), occasioned not only by natural causes but by the appointment of a number of Councillors to the newly formed Senate of Canada; so that the Liberals who were returned … Read more

The Abolition of the Legislative Council of Nova Scotia, 1925-1928

“From the origins of British government in Nova Scotia, there had been a council. The first, established in 1719, combined the roles of cabinet, court of appeal, and upper house of the provincial Legislature. Known simply as the Council or the Council of Twelve (for the twelve members of which it was customarily composed), it … Read more

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