“Obligations: To be signed in the presence of the Superintendent by each attendant and servant , before appointment. I hereby promise to obey the bye-laws and rules of the Hospital, to be careful of its property, and to avoid gossiping about its inmates or affairs. I consider myself bound to perform any duties assigned to me by the Superintendent, or assistant physician. I understand my engagement to be monthly, and I agree to give a months notice in writing, should I wish to leave my situation. If anything contrary to the rules of the Hospital, be done in my presence, or come within my knowledge, I pledge myself to report it to the Medical Superintendent or Assistant Physician and to the Commissioner for the Hospital. I acknowledge the right of the Commissioner of Public Works and Mines to discharge me without warning, for acts of harshness or violence to the …

By-laws of the Nova Scotia Hospital for the Insane, Mount Hope, Dartmouth Read More…

“…any favoured trait can be developed by the proper study of heredity.” “The human family is composed of four classes: The Good, Those who are actuated by high resolves, no matter what their position or associations may be. The Bad, Who are quite intractable The irresponsibles, Insane and idiotic The great bulk of humanity that is moulded by and are the creatures of association and training. The first does not need our attention. The second are ulcerous and diseased outgrowths on society that will pass away and our efforts must be directed to prevent future recurrence. The third, a gradually increasing class, the result of natural causes, and if not to be eliminated in toto could be greatly reduced in numbers. The fourth class is the one that all efforts of society should be directed towards perfecting, for from it the preceding classes spring, and but few laws need to …

Stirpiculture, or, The ascent of man Read More…

I, James S. Wilson, of the City of Halifax, make oath and say as follows : — I was engaged as an assistant, and afterwards as an attendant at the Provincial Hospital for the Insane. I was employed there about fifteen months, and left there the 9th December last. I was employed in all the Male Wards, except M 7. The food was frequently very inferior, the butter rancid, and at times more like lard than butter. In some of the Wards, there was none given to the patients, the attendants had only enough for themselves. The bread was occasionally sour. There were four or five barrels flour which I saw in the bakery, which was sour, about the months of July and August. The baker called my attention to it, and said, ”that he could make bread almost out of saw-dust, but that he could not make good bread …

Supplementary evidence as to the management of the Nova Scotia Hospital for the Insane, Mount Hope, Dartmouth Read More…