DARTMOUTH, Halifax County: This city is located on the east side of Halifax Harbour. A [Mi’kmaq] name was Boonamoogwaddy, “Tomcod ground.” The English name may have been given in honor of William Legge, Earl of Dartmouth, Colonial Secretary 1772-75, but it was probably named for the Devonshire port of Dartmouth. In August, 1750, the Alderney arrived in Halifax (Chebucto) Harbour with 353 settlers on board. On August 23 the Council resolved to settle them across the Harbour from Halifax. Before the end of 1750, a blockhouse and small military post had been built. In 1751 the settlers suffered from an [Indigenous] attack. After the American Revolution an oil factory was set up and operated by a Nantucket Whaling Company about 1785 to 1792. They built a meeting-house about …

Place Names and Places of Nova Scotia (in Dartmouth Township) Read More…

Here you can see the beltway as political actor, meant to separate what was once the Town of Dartmouth from the communities it had just annexed, Westphal, Woodlawn and Woodside, to become the City of Dartmouth. Tacoma Drive, Penhorn Drive and Oakwood are seen straddling the highway, for a short time they connected, until they didn’t. The 111 is a provincial highway, as such, it certainly wasn’t “Dartmouth” as an entity that was involved in the expropriation required to build it. The Black community “The Avenue” is still seen in this map, shortly before the area was “repurposed” to suit the interests of suburban and rental housing for a caste above, alongside a shopping mall. “Metropolitan map and street guide Halifax and Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada / compiled …

Metropolitan map and street guide Halifax and Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Read More…

Overlooking Halifax, Nova Scotia, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ivan-doig/item/2839, 1968. Ivan Doig Archive, Montana State University (MSU) Library, Bozeman, MT

An examination of the legislated spatial dimensions of Dartmouth – from its initial definition as a township, care of the Royal instructions that accompanied Cornwallis in 1749, to its dissolution by fiat into a county masquerading as a city in Nova Scotia’s municipal coup of 1996. “And whereas for the better security, regulation and government of our said settlement, it will be necessary that such persons as we shall judge proper to send to our said province should be settled in townships; you are therefore hereby authorized and required to appoint such proper persons as you shall find there fully qualified to carry along with you forthwith to survey and mark out the said townships in such manner and at such places as is herein directed, that is …

Body politic, Body corporate; City limits Read More…

“Within the constituencies, too, the Conservative gains appear to have been quite uniform. Robert McCleave and Michael Forrestall improved their party’s fortunes by comparable amounts throughout the City of Halifax, the City of Dartmouth, and the municipality of the County of Halifax.” Beck, J. Murray “The Electoral Behaviour of Nova Scotia in 1965” Dalhousie Review, Volume 46, Number 1, 1966 https://dalspace.library.dal.ca/bitstream/handle/10222/59079/dalrev_vol46_iss1_pp29_38.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

A list of all of the acts passed in the Nova Scotia legislature from 1789-1996 in regards to Dartmouth, be it “Dartmouth Town”, the “Dartmouth town plot”, “Dartmouth township”, the “Town of Dartmouth” or the “City of Dartmouth”.

What is now a flower garden at the corner of Alderney Drive (and what used to be) Park Avenue. On the part of Park Avenue seen extending across Alderney Drive is a clue as to the number of buildings that once dotted the shoreline, mostly industrial, all since demolished, lands that have remained vacant for decades ever since. A view of Alderney Drive in the photo below from the same intersection as seen above, looking Southeast.