More time is spent describing Dartmouth here than in many other similar books of its kind, yet another instance of 1756 being given as the date of Dartmouth’s “destruction” at the hands of the Mi’kmaq. The timing of 1756 in regards to the delay of the institution of representative government at Halifax until 1758, and the requirement of a population of 50 families in order to qualify for a representative in the legislature, has always struck me as curious. Earlier events, such as the arrival and settlement of various “wastrels” as well as the “King’s bad bargains” has led me to question whether it was the Mi’kmaq who were involved in the “destruction of Dartmouth” at all, but instead whether it was settlers dressed up as Indians (a technique seen later during the Tea Party). I’m not sure how far those intent on advancing their position would go, whether it …

A Plan of National Colonization Read More…

“Contains chiefly correspondence of British proprietor and governor of Nova Scotia Thomas Temple and his nephew John Nelson concerning land claims in Nova Scotia and the French role in Canada” Temple, Thomas, 1614-1674. Thomas Temple correspondence concerning Nova Scotia, 1656-1768. [Nelson, John, 1660-1721] A.L.(unsigned draft) to [Charles Talbot, Duke of Shrewsbury?]; [London?, 1696?]. MS Am 1249 (32). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. https://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL.HOUGH:33504516?n=1

“Contains chiefly correspondence of British proprietor and governor of Nova Scotia Thomas Temple and his nephew John Nelson concerning land claims in Nova Scotia and the French role in Canada” Temple, Thomas, 1614-1674. Thomas Temple correspondence concerning Nova Scotia, 1656-1768. Nelson, John, 1660-1721. A.L.s.(draft) to the Board of Trade; [London] 12 Apr 1697. MS Am 1249 (35). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. https://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL.HOUGH:33504540?n=1

“Contains chiefly correspondence of British proprietor and governor of Nova Scotia Thomas Temple and his nephew John Nelson concerning land claims in Nova Scotia and the French role in Canada” Temple, Thomas, 1614-1674. Thomas Temple correspondence concerning Nova Scotia, 1656-1768. Stamford, Thomas Gray, 2nd earl of, 1654-1720. MS.(notarial copy); [London] 1 Jul 1697. MS Am 1249 (37). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. https://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL.HOUGH:33504550?n=2

“Contains chiefly correspondence of British proprietor and governor of Nova Scotia Thomas Temple and his nephew John Nelson concerning land claims in Nova Scotia and the French role in Canada” Temple, Thomas. “Thomas Temple correspondence concerning Nova Scotia. Cobham, Sir Richard Temple, viscount. A.L.s. to [John] Nelson; [London, 23 Jul 1697.]. MS Am 1249 (38).” Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. https://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL.HOUGH:33504554?n=1

This charter is written as one block of text, without any punctuation or break, and a lot of “olde English”. I did my best to find the natural breaks in the text, as well as correcting what are now misspellings, in order to ease its legibility. Any mention of Nova Scotia or Acadia are in bold in order to make it easier to pick them out, not because that is how they are presented in the original text. WILLIAM & MARY by the grace of God King and Queen of England Scotland France and Ireland Defenders of the Faith &c To all to whom these presents shall come Greeting. Whereas his late Majesty King James the First Our Royall Predecessor by his Letters Patents under the Great Seal of England bearing date at Westminster the Third Day of November in the Eighteenth year of his Reign, did Give and Grant …

The Charter of Massachusetts Bay (1691) Read More…

“Disaster is frequently the parent of legislation. In surveying the long history of Nova Scotia, we find this saying particularly true.” “The first recorded instance of illness in Nova Scotia is the account of Champlain of an outbreak of scurvy at Port Royal in 1606. His group of settlers had spent the winter of 1605 at St. Croix Island, where, of a group of seventy-nine, forty-four died of scurvy. In Port Royal in the following year twelve of forty-five died.” “Of all the epidemics, that of smallpox carried with it the greatest destruction and terror. In 1694 an epidemic was present among the [Indigenous people] of Acadia, but we have no knowledge of the number dying as a result. We may be sure it was large, however…” “There was again an outbreak in Acadia in 1709 where there is evidence to suggest that the disease was of the haemorrhagic type. …

The Development of Public Health in Nova Scotia Read More…