Considering that most of the literature on the eugenics movement downplays or ignores its history in Nova Scotia, this amazing dissertation is proof one can’t always rely on what little is initially apparent in order to guide the search for facts, especially in regards to Nova Scotia. Never let an initial apparent lack of data discourage your efforts. If you’ve been a member of the “lower classes” in Nova Scotia you too may feel a kind of familiarity with the ways in which eugenics aims were pursued in your life, especially when it comes to experiences and interactions with teachers, …

Institutionalizing Eugenics: Custody, Class, Gender And Education In Nova Scotia’s Response To The “Feeble-Minded”, 1890-1931 More…

“The Ku Klux Klan movement in New Brunswick in the 1920s and 1930s was part of a wave of anti-Catholicism in the Northeast. The supposedly American organization’s connections with local Protestants, such as the Orange Order and Conservative politicians, coupled with New Brunswick’s long history of anti-Catholicism, indicate that the Klan’s nativism was not foreign to the province. Instead, it was part of a region-wide response to a thriving Catholic population that challenged the Protestant, anglophone milieu. The Klan’s transnational “Patriotic-Protestantism” rejected bilingualism and Catholic participation in the political sphere while promoting traditional Anglo-Saxon values and Protestant morality.” “As an …

“A Clarion Call To Real Patriots The World Over”: The Curious Case of the Ku Klux Klan of Kanada in New Brunswick during the 1920s and 1930s More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: Here is Wentworth Park and the children’s playground. The photograph, taken from the foot of Wentworth Street looking east, shows the vacant spaces of the former Glendenning field now occupied by the Curling Rink and the Woodlawn Dairy plant. At the extreme right is the edge of the outdoor rink set up after the Marks-Cross Arena burned down in 1933. The Dartmouth Lumber Company building fronting Canal Street has since been moved farther south to make room for the Dominion Stores building and parking lots. Among the trees on the upper …

1933 More…

From The Story of Dartmouth, by John P. Martin: This photo of Sterns’ corner taken about 1930, shows the Governor Wentworth cannon in the same position as seen today near the Portland Street show-window of Dartmouth Furnishers, Ltd. The other large structure two doors north was the first brick building of Dartmouth, erected by Luther Sterns as a store and dwelling about 1864. In a section of his dry-goods establishment, was the local Post Office. One of Dartmouth’s famous residents who called in for morning mail was the great Joseph Howe.