I, James S. Wilson, of the City of Halifax, make oath and say as follows : — I was engaged as an assistant, and afterwards as an attendant at the Provincial Hospital for the Insane. I was employed there about fifteen months, and left there the 9th December last. I was employed in all the Male Wards, except M 7. The food was frequently very inferior, the butter rancid, and at times more like lard than butter. In some of the Wards, there was none given to the patients, the attendants had only enough for themselves. The bread was occasionally sour. There were four or five barrels flour which I saw in the bakery, which was sour, about the months of July and August. The baker called my attention to it, and said, ”that he could make bread almost out of saw-dust, but that he could not make good bread …

Supplementary evidence as to the management of the Nova Scotia Hospital for the Insane, Mount Hope, Dartmouth Read More…

“The total number of [Black] slaves brought into Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island from the revolted colonies previous to the summer of 1784 may be estimated with some approach to certainty. Under instructions from Sir Guy Carleton, Colonel Morse, commanding Royal Engineer, made a tour of the Provincial settlements in the autumn of 1783 and early part of the summer of 1784, and to his report appended a “return of the disbanded troops and Loyalists settling in Nova Scotia,” for the purpose of ascertaining the number entitled to the “Royal Bounty of Provisions.” In the column allotted to ”servants” are, Dartmouth, 41 ; Country Harbour, 41 ; Chedabucto, 61 ; Island St. John, now Prince Edward Island, 26; Antigonish, 18; Cumberland, etc., 21 ; Partridge Island, now Parrsboro, 69 ; Cornwallis and Horton, 38 ; Newport and Kennetcook, 22 ; Windsor, 21 ; Annapolis Royal, etc., 230 …

The slave in Canada (1899) Read More…

“The annals of Dartmouth and its sister townships contain several tales of a by-gone era, whose recital has often brought tears to humble eyes and which may yet have a charm for a more general and critical audience.” Lawson, William Mrs. “History of the townships of Dartmouth, Preston and Lawrencetown, Halifax county, N.S. : (Akins historical prize essay)” Halifax, N.S. : Morton, 1893. https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.09015/3?r=0&s=1

“Medals are awarded to Messrs. P. McNab, of Dartmouth, and H.M. Moyle, “for cereals of excellent quality.” It may appear singular that both should have a similar award for apparently similar products. It is to be understood that the two cases are not altogether parallel. Both exhibited wheat, barley, and oats – so that both were exhibitors of Cereals, – but McNab’s wheat was the best, while Moyle’s oats were the best…” Nova Scotia Committee for the Dublin International Exhibition. “Report of the Nova Scotia Department of the Dublin International Exhibition, 1865”, Halifax, N.S. : A. Grant, 1866. https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.40353/1?r=0&s=1

“In November and December of the year 1750 the following officers were appointed to the Dartmouth militia… Robert Campbell, to be Captain Jos. Scott, Thos. Burke, Thos. Leake, Josiah Rogerson, to be Lieutenants” Edwards, Joseph Plimsoll. “The militia of Nova Scotia, 1749-1867”, 1911 https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.78682/1?r=0&s=1

A mandamus was applied for, at the Instance of the Sessions for the County of Halifax, to compel the Warden and Council of the Town of Dartmouth to assess on the property of the town liable for assessment the sum of $15,076 for its proportion of County School Rates for the years 1873-1878, under section 62 of the Educational Act, Revised Statutes, chapter 32. Held, that the Warden and Town Council ought to have assessed in each year for the proportion of the County school assessment payable by the town, but that in view of the act to amend the act to incorporate the town, (1877, chapter 40,) section 30 of which provided that the sum to be voted at the annual meeting of the town for the estimates, including ordinary and extraordinary expenses, should not exceed in any year the sum of $15,000, there was a difficulty in the …

Queen v. Town Council of Dartmouth Read More…

Without such hazards of giving offense, we can never arrive at anything that approaches political truth, perhaps a key to the bubble wrap of political correctness that can be used to strangle the dissent of today. Joseph Howe, as a perpetual rabble-rouser, understood this better than most, and he was willing to “die by the sword” under charges of seditious libel in order to advance the human condition of his country. “It is sometimes said, the mother country has its great charter, its Bill of Rights, and why should we not have a charter, or some such written guarantee for our liberties. Those who reason thus forget that these great securities of Britons are ours also; that we have besides, the whole body of parliamentary precedents accumulated by the practice of the Imperial legislature. We have more; we have our colonial precedents since 1840; the resolutions recorded on the journals …

“At some hazard of giving offence” Read More…

“As I was waiting in silence for right direction, and feeling the Divine presence near, it opened to me , that as my prospect of going to Nova Scotia remained weighty, my best way was to take a passage by water, from this place, if I could obtain it. I knew not that this was likely to be had; but, on going to the door soon after, a man came to me and queried, whence I came, and whither I was going. I told him I came from near Philadelphia, and was going to Dartmouth, in Nova Scotia, if I could get there; that I had been advised to go by water, but knew not how to get a passage. He then informed me of a vessel bound for that place, which was to sail the next day. My companion having walked out, and the man being willing to go …

A Journal of the Life, Travels, Religious Exercises and Labours in the Work of the Ministry of Joshua Evans, Late of Newton Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey Read More…

“It’s always called the Halifax Explosion, but the fiery blast from a collision of the ships Imo and Mont Blanc in Halifax Harbour’s Narrows the morning of Dec. 6, 1917 wreaked destruction on Dartmouth as well. About 40 people on the Dartmouth side of the harbour were killed outright. More died over the next two weeks from injuries or from pneumonia that set in after a massive snowstorm that began the night of the disaster. Former mayor Claude Morris, then a young pharmacy clerk, was lucky that day. Neither he nor his family suffered any serious injury from the blast. “There were two distinct blasts. I had no idea what it was, I was just running for home.” Running beside Morris was a blacksmith with the last name of Llyod, and Morris remembers the two wondered if the harbor had been bombed.”

“the inhabitants of the town plot of Dartmouth…in said town…the district of Dartmouth” Chapter 6 of the Acts of 1789, “An act to enable the Inhabitants of the Town Plot of Dartmouth to use and occupy the Common Field, granted them by his excellency the Lieutenant-Governor, in such way as they may think most beneficial to them”http://0-nsleg–edeposit.gov.ns.ca.legcat.gov.ns.ca/deposit/Statutes/at_large/volume1/1789.pdf “Common of the town of Dartmouth…the common of the township of Dartmouth; situate on the eastern side of the harbour of Halifax, in special trust, for the use of the inhabitants settled and resident in the town plot, or that might thereafter settle, and actually reside, within the township of Dartmouth… Within the township of Dartmouth” Chapter 2 of the Acts of 1797, “An act to enable the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, or Commander in chief for the time being, to appoint Trustees, for the Common of the Town of Dartmouth, on the death, …

Body politic, Body corporate; City limits Read More…

To the Editor of the Sun:Allow me through your valuable paper to make a few remarks upon an article which appeared in the “Citizen” this evening, with references to the dastardly murder of President Lincoln.The writer most unblushingly labors to lay the perpetration of this awful crime at the doors of what he terms the “radical Republican party,” saying that “these extremists clamor for the blood of every southerner, and the confiscation of all southern property,” and that they were deeply dissatisfied with the moderate policy lately foreshadowed by Lincoln and Seward.I would like to ask from what source the writer draws his valuable information. Do we not all know that the Northern people were filled with joy at the prospect of a speedy restoration of peace, and that the magnanimity which Mr. Lincoln has treated General Lee and his officers has not only met their most hearty acquiescence and greatest …

“…the dastardly murder of President Lincoln” Read More…

BUSINESS DIRECTORY FOR DARTMOUTH.OFFICIALS Hon. J.W. Johnston, Judge in EquityHon. Joseph Howe, Commissioner of FisheriesLawrence Hartshorne, City TreasurerCol. Sinclair, A.G.M.James H. Thorne, Dep. Prov. Sec. and Chief Clerk MINISTERSRev. John B. Woods, St. Peter’s ChurchRev. O. M. Grindon, English Church BARRISTERSJ.W. Johnston, Junr, Office, HalifaxAlexander James, Office, HalifaxJ. G. Foster, Office, Halifax PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONST.B. Des Brisay, M.D., corner of King and Quarrel stsR.S. Campbell, M.D., {Dealer in Patent Medicines, Paints, Oils, &c.L.E. Van Buskirk, M.D.W.H. Weeks, King Street MERCHANTSAllan, J.W, Grocer and Dealer in LumberBrown, J.C, {General Dealer in Groceries and Liquors, &c.Bettinsen, J, Groceries and Boarding HouseElliott, J.B., & Co, Dealers in Dry GoodsElliot, Wm, {Soap and Candle Manufactory, and General Dealer in Groceries and Country ProduceElliott, J, & Son, {Dealers in all kinds of Building Materials; and. Carpenters and Builders Plans and Estimates furníshedFarrell, D, Dealer in Groceries and LumberFuller, J.A, {Of the firm of J. B. …

Dartmouth Business Directory, 1864 Read More…

From: Topographical township map of Halifax County, Nova Scotia / from actual surveys made, drawn, & engraved by and under the direction of H.F. Walling. Map of Nova Scotia and adjacent provinces, Creator: Walling, Henry Francis, 1825-1888, Publication Date: 1864, Map Publisher: A.F. Church and Co. https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agdm/id/14725/rec/1

From: Topographical township map of Halifax County, Nova Scotia / from actual surveys made, drawn, & engraved by and under the direction of H.F. Walling. Map of Nova Scotia and adjacent provinces, Creator: Walling, Henry Francis, 1825-1888, Publication Date: 1864, Map Publisher: A.F. Church and Co. https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agdm/id/14725/rec/1

“With the Conservatives enthroned at Ottawa under Sir John A. Macdonald, a bye-election in Halifax, already represented by one Conservative in the House of Assembly and by the Conservatives Kenny and Stairs at Ottawa, was no slight undertaking. But it was now or never for Mr. Fielding, and his courage proved equal to the occasion. Happily for him, his opponent indulged in an infelicitous anecdote in the course of his speech in Dartmouth, which in itself must have gone far in the way of accounting for the majority given for him in the election. He told a story at which sensitive believers in the doctrine of Purgatory might easily be led to take offence. The Acadian Recorder nicknamed him “Purgatory Payzant”, and skilfully harped upon the offensive anecdote at the expense of the Conservative candidate night after night until the election was over. The majority for Mr. Fielding was 183 …

Recollections of W.S. Fielding Read More…

“THE Cunard family is of German origin. In 1683, Thones Kunders emigrated from Crefeld to Philadelphia, where he was granted land by William Penn himself. His great-grandson, Abraham Cunard, came to Halifax from Philadelphia some time before 1785. He was a carpenter by trade, and obtained employment in the Dock Yard. His wife’s name was Margaret Murphy. She came with a band of Loyalists from South Carolina” “Cunard’s wharf is the centre of the West India trade, and the firm keeps Lyle and Chappell of Dartmouth busy building ships for it and giving employment to hundreds of men. John Cunard is master of one of their vessels.” MacMechan, A. “The Rise of Samuel Cunard” Dalhousie Review, Volume 09, Number 2, 1929 https://dalspace.library.dal.ca/bitstream/handle/10222/64297/dalrev_vol9_iss2_pp202_210.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

MR. JUSTICE JOHNSTONE My earliest recollection of the late Judge Johnston dates back to the years when he was the proprietor of Mount Amelia, which was then a large estate of many acres, but has since been divided up into a number of holdings any one of which is large enough to make forty or fifty ordinary town lots. The judge took a very great interest in his property, planting thorns and cedars which still flourish, and a number of seedlings that have since become magnificent oaks of which he thought a1most as much as of his children. I have often heard an old farmer since deceased, who was afterwards an occupant of the property, describe the interest with which the old judge watched the growth of hjs trees of which he could tell the year, month, and day of planting. The house was standing until a few years ago, …

Reminiscences of the Nova Scotia Judiciary Read More…

“Nine years later, one finds this institute arranging an excursion to Portland, “under the auspices of the Marine Charitable Mechanics’ Association of Portland”, which brought not only much pleasure, but a £60 profit for the building fund . Dartmouth Mechanics’ Institute, Nova Scotia, arranged a picnic and bazaar, under the patronage of Lieutenant Governor Falkland, on neighbouring McNab’s Island in 1845, and this was recognized as ” the outstanding summer event in the social life of the community.” Four thousand people were conveyed by ferries to a picnic ground, where displays were intermingled with refreshment stands, with music provided by a military band, and with everything from quoits, balls, and swings, to dancing on the green. A gross profit of £500 was realized and was to facilitate construction of the institute’s new building in the following year. The neighbouring Halifax Mechanics’ Institute, doubtless chagrined that this more recent foundation was …

The Work/Leisure Ethic in Adult Education Read More…

“As a man, as well as a map-maker, Ambrose F. Church was an interesting figure. He retained his United States citizenship even though he resided in Nova Scotia for many years. It is alleged that he was a deserter from the United States army and that that was one reason why he came to Nova Scotia and never returned to the United States to live. He was not only a respected resident of Nova Scotia but a great family man…” “When Ambrose Finson Church moved from Maine to Nova Scotia in 1865, he had a wife and one daughter, Alice Isabel. Probably after living in Halifax for a time, they took up residence at Ochterloney Street in Dartmouth by 1868. There they lived until they moved to Bedford, Halifax County, Nova Scotia. The family was still living in Dartmouth at the time of the census of 1871. Ambrose Church was …

Ambrose F. Church, Map-Maker Read More…

“Across the harbour from Halifax were the settlements of Dartmouth and Preston, already economically dominated by the capital. Dartmouth had been settled in 1784 by twenty families from Nantucket. The men had been engaged in whaling, as had the men of Barrington, but the enterprise had suffered a financial disaster in 1792, and most of the original inhabitants had moved to Milford in South Wales. Preston had been settled in 1784 by Loyalists, disbanded soldiers, and freed [Black] slaves. Only the Loyalists had remained. The [Black people] were industrious, gaining a living by supplying butter, eggs, and poultry to Halifax, but most of them had taken advantage of the offer in 1791, extended by the British government, to resettle them in the newly purchased Colony of Sierra Leone. Of the other group of settlers Haliburton notes that “the disbanded soldiers were prone to idleness and intemperance, and when they had …

The Geography of Haliburton’s Nova Scotia Read More…

“The final candidate, Roland Thornhill, 38, was something of an outsider and was viewed as a dark horse. Born in Newfoundland, Thornhill’s family had moved to Dartmouth when he was quite young. Thornhill had never sought provincial office, but was the mayor of Dartmouth. He was a businessman and a Protestant.” Stewart, David K. “Delegate Support Patterns at Nova Scotian Leadership Conventions” Dalhousie Review, Volume 69, Number 1, 1989 https://dalspace.library.dal.ca/bitstream/handle/10222/60988/dalrev_vol69_iss1_pp95_126.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

“THERE can be few incidents in Nova Scotian history which, on the surface, present a greater enigma than that of the Dartmouth whale fishery. In 1785 a fleet of thirteen whalers, with fishermen and their families, came to Dartmouth. They put up houses, and settled, and in three years built up a successful and lucrative industry. But four years later, in the full enjoyment of it, suddenly, and for no apparent reason, they packed up their belongings, left their homes to tumble down or rot, and sailed away. This strange interlude has attracted scant attention from contemporary or subsequent writers. The loyalist and romantic town of Shelburne, whose dramatic rise and fall after the loyalists’ coming has evoked prolonged comment from nearly everyone who has written on that period of Nova Scotian history, presented no stranger phenomenon than contemporary Dartmouth. Yet no Haliburton has arisen to grieve over her deserted …

The Dartmouth Whalers Read More…