The first passenger service from Dartmouth’s new railway station, commenced on January 6th, 1886. E. M. Walker sent the first lot of freight. Connection was made at Halifax with inward and outward trains. The skating rink continued to be the centre of winter activity with …

1886 More…

By 1873 the newly established industries of Dartmouth were commencing to participate in the usual practice of holding annual sleigh-drives hereabouts. These establishments could not be expected to advertise their wares in all of the numerous newspapers then being published in Halifax, and consequently took …

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This was the first house on the Prince Arthur’s Park hillside, constructed and occupied about 1870 by John P. Esdaile, Esq., a Montreal merchant. The Russells later called the place “Mount Pleasant.” The Redmonds re-named it “Blink Bonnie.”

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This sketch shows part of Admiral Saunders’ fleet on which General Wolfe sailed for the siege of Quebec. Many of these warships came here first from England, then sailed in a convoy to the St. Lawrence River via Louisbourg. Men on fatigue duty are carrying …

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Newspapers about this time were filled with accounts of political meetings, for this was the year of the Provincial elections. The Liberal candidates in Halifax County were Henry Y. Mott and Joseph Howe. The Conservatives were James F. Gray and William Lawson. (Four other candidates …

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The year 1847 opened with a severe spell of weather. Newspaper items early in January inform us that “there was superior skating on the Dartmouth Lakes”. The thermometer at Citadel Hill registered 15 below on the 20th. The Axe Firemen of Halifax made merry on …

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Regattas on the harbor were resumed the summer of 1831. In June, the four-mile whaler race was won by four Dartmouth men rowing the “Edward Cunard”. The second boat was the “Pucelle”. Both had been built by Mr. Coleman at Dartmouth. At a second regatta in August, …

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A packet-boat from England which arrived on Saturday, May 21, 1814, brought the most welcome news in 20 years to Governor Nicholas D’Anseville still in exile at Woodlawn. Napoleon had abdicated; and the Bourbon King Louis XVIII was being restored! Mrs. Lawson, in her History …

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On June 6, 1813, great animation prevailed when the Shannon brought in the captured Chesapeake. The picture in Grade IX school-books conveys an idea of what Dartmouth-ians rowed out to greet on that exciting Sunday. Captain Broke (Brook) of the Shannon was so badly wounded …

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Word came to Halifax that England and the United States had declared war. This aroused great activity around the Dockyard and Halifax wharves where privateers were continually being fitted out for expeditions that were sometimes disastrous, but often very profitable. As owners shared prize money …

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Most of the material In the Halifax weekly newspaper comprises advertisements and clippings from Old Country journals. Local items are largely limited to movements of ships. Incidents hereabouts had to be very exceptional to be published. A death or a marriage notice would often appear, …

1780s More…

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During the 1770s, the weekly newspaper of Halifax kept Dartmouthians informed of the growing discontent in the American colonies leading up to the Revolution. Captain Preston, involved in the so-called Boston massacre of 1770, was soon to have his name applied to a new township …

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