“Contains chiefly correspondence of British proprietor and governor of Nova Scotia Thomas Temple and his nephew John Nelson concerning land claims in Nova Scotia and the French role in Canada” Temple, Thomas, 1614-1674. Thomas Temple correspondence concerning Nova Scotia, 1656-1768. Stamford, Thomas Gray, 2nd earl of, 1654-1720. MS.(notarial copy); [London] 1 Jul 1697. MS Am 1249 (37). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. https://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL.HOUGH:33504550?n=2

“On the east side of the harbor opposite the city is situated the town of Dartmouth; between which places a semi-hourly communication is kept up by steam-boats.” Spedon, Andrew Learmont. Rambles Among the Blue-noses: Or, Reminiscences of a Tour Through New Brunswick And Nova Scotia During the Summer of 1862. Montreal: Lovell, 1863. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/umn.31951002286200x

“The baronetage, which forms a distinct estate of nobility in the British empire, intermediate between the peerage and knighthood, was erected by his majesty king James I by Charter under the great seal, on the 22nd of May, 1611” roun, R. (Richard), Sir, 1801-1858. Case of the Honourable the Baronets of Scotland And Nova Scotia: Shewing Their Rights And Privileges, Dignatorial And Territorial. Edinburgh: W. Blackwood, 1836. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/aeu.ark:/13960/t2d80df70

“Every man who is invited or proposes to enter into any partnership or agreement, naturally thinks of the advantages and disadvantages it will involve or produce to himself.” Marshall, (Judge) John George. “Facts And Reasons Against New Brunswick And Nova Scotia Confederating With Canada: Addressed to the Electors of New Brunswick”. [S.l.: s.n., 1866. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/aeu.ark:/13960/t41r80t31

“Contains chiefly correspondence of British proprietor and governor of Nova Scotia Thomas Temple and his nephew John Nelson concerning land claims in Nova Scotia and the French role in Canada” Temple, Thomas. “Thomas Temple correspondence concerning Nova Scotia. Cobham, Sir Richard Temple, viscount. A.L.s. to [John] Nelson; [London, 23 Jul 1697.]. MS Am 1249 (38).” Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. https://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL.HOUGH:33504554?n=1

“Then one should visit Dartmouth, across the harbor from Halifax, so picturesquely dropped among its dark hills. Ferry-boats run every quarter hour between the places. The town has some 6,000 inhabitants, a sugar refinery, a marine railway, a rope-walk, a skate factory, and – by no means least imposing feature – the great grim pile of Mount Hope Lunatic Asylum. Back of Dartmouth, to the north, lies the beautiful chain of the Dartmouth Lakes, a famous resort of skaters, when the ice has set firmly. From these lakes runs the old Shubenacadie Canal, connecting those waters with those of Minas Basin and Fundy by way of the Shubenacadie River.” Presbrey, Frank, 1855-1936. Acadia And Thereabouts … [New York: Seaman-Presbrey, 1896. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/yale.39002034879321

“Across the harbor from Halifax is Dartmouth, where there are numerous rope-works and dry-docks – a purely commercial and practical district; and two miles out of Dartmouth, at Woodside, the Acadia Sugar Refining Plant has extensive works. Pretty names, these two towns possess, but perhaps they don’t live up to them. Just as Cow Bay, a stretch of shore where people sought pleasure in bathing and boating, certainly did not live down to its name. I was told an American made the remark that it was an outrage for such a beautiful place to bear so ugly a cognomen; and a prize was forthwith offered for a substitute. Now it is called Silver Sands. Can you see the psychology of the change? Far more people go there now, no doubt lured by the alliterative phrase.” Towne, Charles Hanson, 1877-1949. Ambling Through Acadia. New York: Century co., 1923. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/uva.x000691985

“As I said before, to make the festivities complete, in the afternoon there was a procession to lay the corner-stone of a Lunatic Asylum. But oh! how the jolly old rain poured down upon the luckless pilgrimage! There were the “Virgins” of Masonic Lodge No. -, the Army Masons, in scarlet; the African Masons, in ivory and black; the Scotch-piper Mason, with his legs in enormous plaid trowsers, defiant of Shakspeare’s theory about the sensitiveness of some men, when the bag-pipe sings i’ the nose; the Clerical Mason in shovel hat; the municipal artillery; the Sons of Temperance, and the band. Away they marched, with drum and banner, key and compasses, BIBLE and sword, to Dartmouth, in great feather, for the eyes of Halifax were upon them.” “Is this fairy land ? No, it is only poor, old, barren Nova Scotia, and yet I think Felix, Prince of Salerno, if …

Acadia, or, A month with blue noses Read More…

“That ample time has now elapsed since the building of the Intercolonial Railway and the clearing away of the difficulties which at first beset the rapid and regular running of the trains and the patience of the people of the Maritime provinces is well nigh exhausted, when they experience the continued delays in the complete carrying out of the agreements and promises in making a national outlet via the port of Halifax, and a feeling of alarm, almost amounting to consternation, has taken hold of our people in witnessing the freight which for two winters had been landed at Halifax for transmission over the Intercontinental Railway, carried to a foreign port, thus losing to the road the temporary ground gained – in fact almost entirely abrogating the whole conditions entered into by the Government of Canada in these particulars and damping the hopes and expectations based upon the engagements of …

The Memorial of the citizens of Halifax and the Chamber of Commerce of the city of Halifax, setting forth the necessity of making Halifax the winter port of Canada Read More…

“Much misrepresentation has been indulged in concerning the increased debt of the Dominion, and comparisons made between it and the federal debt of the United States most unfair to Canada… the different purposes for which the two debts were incurred are also kept out of sight ,- that of Canada having been for valuable public works, from which the country will forever derive increasing advantages, while that of the United States is wholly for an unfortunate war.” “On the question of repeal we dissent entirely from the position taken by our opponents… If elected we shall advocate all measures calculated to make Halifax the winter port of Canada – to hasten the extension of the C.P.R. by means of the short line to Halifax Harbor… to secure the best solution of the Nova Scotia railway problem that can be found in the interest of Halifax and the Province.” Stairs, J. …

To the electors of the county of Halifax Read More…

“Any lunatic being at large may be apprehended under warrant from two Justices of the Peace and if his legal settlement shall be in any place within the County or District, he shall be secured within the same; and if such settlement shall not be within the County or District, he shall be sent by the Justices by order under their hands, to the place of his last legal settlement, and shall be there secured under a warrant from two Justices of the Peace for the County or District to which lie shall be so removed, and the charges of removing, maintaining and curing such person during his restraint, having been first proved on oath before two Justices, shall be paid out of the proceeds of the personal property, or the rents of the real estate of such person, if am’ he have over and above what will maintain his …

An act relating to lunatics and to the custody and estates of lunatics Read More…

Harvard Law School Library. “Description Legislative history regarding treaties of commerce with France, Spain relating to New Foundland, Nova Scotia, and Cape Breton,” ca. 1715? Small Manuscript Collection, Harvard Law School Library. https://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.LIBR:19686447, Accessed 07 June 2021

Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library. “A map of Cabotia” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1814. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/a9d6bc40-2357-0133-af56-58d385a7b928

The achievement of Responsible government in the Maritimes created possibilities for significant change in their legal cultures. Whether those possibilities were actualised is a matter of some debate, closely linked to a major theme in Maritime historiography: the meaning of responsible government. An older literature, echoing much contemporary opinion, celebrated the triumph of the reformers as an unqualified good. Careers would open to talents, government would be rendered more accountable, and the humble yeoman would be able to participate actively in a more democratic form of government. In recent decades historians have taken a more jaundiced view of the achievements of responsible government. They have stressed continuity rather than change, suggesting that older elites retained most of their economic and political power. At worst, all that the transition to responsible government involved was replacement of a system based on imperial patronage to one based on partisan allegiance. (or the older …

The Maritime Provinces, 1850-1939: Lawyers and Legal Institutions Read More…

The term “proprietor” was used in two distinct senses in the American colonies. In order fully to understand the nature and the scope of the present study, therefore, it is necessary at the outset to distinguish these two usages. “The more familiar usage of the word “proprietor” is with reference to the proprietary provinces. The “Lords Proprietary” or “Lords Proprietors,” whether single persons or groups of grantees, were created and constituted by the crown on the model of the Palatinate of Durham. They held both territorial and governmental powers and like “the feudal seigneurs of the middle ages, became, or aimed to become, the lords of great colonial territories to which they were to stand as to any fief or estate of land.” The institution, in this sense, was essentially feudal and monarchial in its character. The more noted examples of such Lords Proprietary or Proprietors are William Penn of …

The town proprietors of the New England Colonies: a study of their development, organization, activities and controversies, 1620-1770 Read More…

“I learned… that there was a class of persons in Nova Scotia called the Blue Noses (so called from a kind of potato which thrives well here.) Whether this nick-name is an appropriate one or not, I did not become sufficiently acquainted with their habits to determine. This much however is true, that they are not in the habit of setting a very high value either on their own time or that of others.” “In spite of the large extent of barren and rocky land in the south, and what is a more serious evil, those seven or eight months of frost and snow, which crowd the labors of the agriculturalist into so brief a season, the resources of the province are very great.” “In this province the stranger may see that there is a political dissatisfaction among the inhabitants; however not to so great an extent as in the …

Sketches on a tour through the northern and eastern states, the Canadas & Nova Scotia Read More…

“In the United States there should be much interest in the Diocese of Nova Scotia, for that Diocese owes its existence to the Tories of the Revolution, who went in thousands from New York and Massachusetts to the “Acadian Province by the Sea,” and its first bishop was, at the outbreak of the war, the honored rector of the leading Church in the older Colonies.” “If it had not been for the fierce legislation of the Whigs in the various colonies against the adherents of the crown, the history of this part of the country, both secular and religious, would be vastly different from what it is.” “The attention of New York loyalists seems to have been early directed towards the almost uninhabited province of New Brunswick.” Eaton, Arthur Wentworth Hamilton, 1849-1937. The Church of England In Nova Scotia And the Tory Clergy of the Revolution. 2d ed. New York: …

The Church of England in Nova Scotia and the Tory clergy of the revolution Read More…

“The following list of [Mi’kmaq] names of places, rivers, etc., in Nova Scotia and neighborhood was compiled, at my request, by Miss Elizabeth Frame, of Shubenacadie, for the library of the Massachusetts Historical Society, and was duly presented at the meeting on June 9, 1892. She was aided in her labors by a [Mi’kmaq], as well as by the published works of Mr. Gesner and Dr. Rand. It is now printed at the expense of a gentleman of Cambridge, who is interested in [Indigenous] philology. Samuel A. Green” “The Micmac left no sculptured gods, No temples made of stone; In misty caves, in storm-tossed clouds, Minitou dwelt alone. But names remain on hill and plain, Of this once powerful race, And in those liquid Micmac words, Their presence yet we trace. Where Aspatogon lifts her brow, Unblushing, to the sea; Where crashing ice-cases dash and break, On lonely Scatarie; Where …

A list of [Mi’kmaq] names of places, rivers, etc., in Nova Scotia Read More…

“This great statesman, had he been born in the United States would have been at least Vice President; had he lived in England, he would have occupied a place beside John Bright in the affections of the British people. But he was born and lived in Nova Scotia; he ruled in the councils of his Province; he became a minister of the Dominion; and he came home to die the Governor of his native land.” Griffin, Martin J. (Martin Joseph), 1847-1921. Hon. Joseph Howe, Lieut.-governor of Nova Scotia: In Memoriam. [S.l.: s.n.], 1873. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/aeu.ark:/13960/t41r7565m

“James Delancey, Esquire, of Annapolis, in the Province of Nova Scotia, had a [Black] slave, named Jack, who run away from his service without leave, and went to Halifax, above an hundred miles distant from Annapolis, where he was taken into the service of a Mr. Wooden on wages. On hearing this, Col. Delancy directed his Attorney to write to Mr. Wooden, informing him, that the [Black man] belonged to Mr. Delancey, and that if he detained him, an action would be brought against him for so doing. To which Mr. Wooden’s Attorney returned for answer, that the [Black man] in question was indeed retained by Mr. Wooden in his service, but that he, as well as all other [Black people] in this Province, were Freemen; there not being any other law here to make them otherwise.” Opinions of Several Gentlemen of the Law, On the Subject of Negro Servitude, …

Opinions of several gentlemen of the law, on the subject of [Black] servitude, in the province of Nova-Scotia Read More…

“The said committees shall be appointed by the Magistrates, who shall likewise fill up all vacancies, and the said Committees shall within three days after due notice to them given, make an Alphabetical list of such persons resident within their respective Wards from eighteen years of age and upwards (not being House Servants, Daily Laborers, or People of Color) as they may conceive to be proper persons for watching and paroling or capable by their circumstances to find substitutes. (Clergymen only excepted.)” Halifax (N.S.). Rules And Regulations for the Establishment And Government of a Watch And Patrol In the Town of Halifax. Halifax [N.S.]: Printed by Edmund Ward …, 1818. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/aeu.ark:/13960/t22c0159r

“County courts were first established in Nova Scotia by 37 Vict., c. 18 which was passed on the 7th of May, 1874, but did not go into operation until proclamation made by Lieutenant-Governor in Council (Acts 1874, c. 18, s. 57). Proclamation was made and the act came into force on the 21st of August, 1876.” Bingay, George, and Nova Scotia. The County Court Manual: Being a Collection of the Statutes Relating to the Practice, Procedure And Jurisdiction of the County Courts of Nova Scotia With Notes, Etc.. Toronto: Carswell, 1891. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/hvd.hl4gui