“the inhabitants of the town plot of Dartmouth” Chapter 6 of the Acts of 1789, “An act to enable the Inhabitants of the Town Plot of Dartmouth to use and occupy the Common Field, granted them by his excellency the Lieutenant-Governor, in such way as they may think most beneficial to them”http://0-nsleg–edeposit.gov.ns.ca.legcat.gov.ns.ca/deposit/Statutes/at_large/volume1/1789.pdf “Common of the town of Dartmouth…the common of the township of dartmouth… Inhabitants settled and resident in the town plot… Within the township of Dartmouth” Chapter 2 of the Acts of 1797, “An act to enable the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, or Commander in chief for the time being, …

Body politic, Body corporate; City limits. More…

His Excellency the Governor, together with his Majesty’s Council, having had under mature Consideration, the necessary and most expedient Measures for carrying into Execution those Parts of his Majesty’s Commission and Instructions which relate to the Calling of General Assemblies within the Province, came to the following Resolutions thereon, Viz. That a House of Representatives of the Inhabitants of this Province, be the Civil Legislature thereof, in Conjunction with his Majesty’s Governor or Commander in Chief for the Time being, and his Majesty’s Council of the said Province. The first House to be elected and convened in the following Manner, …

Proclamation, Province of Nova Scotia council chamber, Halifax, January 3rd, 1757 More…

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“Disaster is frequently the parent of legislation. In surveying the long history of Nova Scotia, we find this saying particularly true.” “The first recorded instance of illness in Nova Scotia is the account of Champlain of an outbreak of scurvy at Port Royal in 1606. His group of settlers had spent the winter of 1605 at St. Croix Island, where, of a group of seventy-nine, forty-four died of scurvy. In Port Royal in the following year twelve of forty-five died.” “Of all the epidemics, that of smallpox carried with it the greatest destruction and terror. In 1694 an epidemic was …

The Development of Public Health in Nova Scotia More…

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“Writing in the posthumously published final version of his historical chronicle of early Halifax town, lawyer-archivist Thomas Beamish Akins condemned the infamous 1820 state trial, R. v. Wilkie, in these memorable words: An anonymous pamphlet was published from the press of A.H. [Anthony Henry] Holland, charging the magistrates of the town with malpractices, which caused much excitement. It was discovered to have been written by Mr. William Wilkie, of Halifax. He was indicted for libel, tried at the Easter term of the Supreme Court [17 April 1820] and sentenced to two years imprisonment with hard labor in the House of …

Sedition in Nova Scotia: R. v. Wilkie (1820) and the Incontestable Illegality of Seditious Libel before R. v. Howe (1835) More…

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“Nova Scotia had found [in Joseph Howe] not only its John Wilkes but also its Charles James Fox.” — W.S. MacNutt, 1965 “In a seminal article published in 1974, Kenneth McNaught described Howe as one of Canada’s “two most significant cases involving political freedom of the press” — the other being Dixon for seditious libel arising from the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919. McNaught failed to mention an important early New Brunswick case (Hooper, 1830), where the proprietor-editor of the British Colonist (Saint John) was prosecuted for seditious libel after publishing, under the author’s suggestive Puritan nom-de-plume (“Hampden”), a letter …

Sedition In Nova Scotia: R. v. Howe and the “Contested Legality” of Seditious Libel More…

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“PRACTICALLY, the General Property Tax as actually administered is beyond all doubt one of the worst taxes known in the civilized world. Because of its attempt to tax intangible as well as tangible things it sins against the cardinal rules of uniformity, of equality, and of universality of taxation. It puts a premium on dishonesty and debauches the public conscience; it reduces deception to a system, and makes a science of knavery; it presses hardest on those least able to pay; it imposes double taxation on one man and grants entire immunity to the next. In short, the General Property …

Municipal Taxation in Nova Scotia More…

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“However, the loose organization which had been set up by the Halifax Yacht Club of 1837, despite the frequent changes in personnel of the committees, maintained the interest and support of Haligonians for several years, during which new yachts and new owners of older yachts appeared to compete in annual regattas, and rivalry between Halifax and Dartmouth boat-builders was great. In 1844, the Halifax Times concluded that the regatta could now “be classed among the standard recreations of a Halifax population.” “The regatta of 1851 also was held under the patronage of the Vice-Admiral and managed by a committee of …

Genesis of the R.N.S.Y.S. More…

“Nine years later, one finds this institute arranging an excursion to Portland, “under the auspices of the Marine Charitable Mechanics’ Association of Portland”, which brought not only much pleasure, but a £60 profit for the building fund . Dartmouth Mechanics’ Institute, Nova Scotia, arranged a picnic and bazaar, under the patronage of Lieutenant Governor Falkland, on neighbouring McNab’s Island in 1845, and this was recognized as ” the outstanding summer event in the social life of the community.” Four thousand people were conveyed by ferries to a picnic ground, where displays were intermingled with refreshment stands, with music provided by …

The Work/Leisure Ethic in Adult Education More…

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“The Telephone Utility is one of the oldest and largest public utilities, and perhaps the one which comes into direct contact with the most people in their workaday lives. The telephone was invented in 1876 by Alexander Graham Bell, a man well and favourably known in Nova Scotia, as during the last years of his life he made his home in Cape Breton, just outside of Baddeck. The first telephone in Halifax was installed in 1877, and the first actual commercial use of the service was at the Caledonia Mine, Cape Breton, also in the same year. At this time …

Public Utility Regulation in Nova Scotia More…

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“The basic governmental structure, as it exists to-day, was completed in 1923 with the passing of the Village Supply Act and more recently in 1925 when provision was made for communities. While cities, towns and municipalities constitute the basic units of local government, with villages and communities of lesser importance, a wide variety of governmental organizations perform functions in local areas. Some of these are properly described as units of government, others as types of governmental organization. Still others are merely administrative mechanisms controlled and operated by one or more governmental units. At the present time the law provides for …

Development of Local Government in Nova Scotia More…

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“Prior to 1888 eight towns were incorporated. These were Dartmouth, (1873), Pictou (1874), New Glasgow (1875), Windsor (1878), North Sydney (1885), Sydney (1885), and Kentville (1886), each of which was incorporated by special Act.” “The Towns Incorporation Act of Nova Scotia was passed in 1888, revised in 1895, and embodied in the consolidation of 1900 and the revised statutes of 1954. It requires a majority vote of the ratepayers of the town in support of incorporation before it can be granted. It also requires a certain population within a specified area-in 1954 a population of over 1500 within an area …

Local Government in Nova Scotia More…

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“…from the historical examination of this subject, it becomes manifest that local self-government of the municipality does not spring from nor exist by virtue of written constitutions; that it is not a mere privilege, conferred by the central authority, but that the people in each municipality exercise their franchises under the protection of the fundamental principles just indicated, which were not questioned or doubted when the state constitutions were adopted, and which in the opinion of Judge Cooley and other eminent American jurists, no power in the state can legally disregard.” “Therefore, it appears clear that in a government in …

The Doctrine of an Inherent Right of Local Self-Government. The Extent of Its Application by American Courts More…

“One reason to use the language of a coup is that people know it’s wrong and a violation of Democratic norms — even if they’re not familiar with the exact definition of a coup. We have to be ready to declare loudly and strongly: This is a coup. Even when only a few people go along with the coup, and act as though that’s normal, people may reluctantly accept it as inevitable. In all research on preventing coups, there’s one common theme: People stop doing what coup plotters tell them to do”

Some Highlights: (Chapter 3)Dartmouth shall be a corporation consisting of three wards.Dartmouth shall be governed by a council, consisting of a Warden and six Councillors (two for each ward). Quasi-term limits, staggered terms: Wardens had a One year term, while Councilors had two year terms.Also as to who offers at election time, a mandatory turn over of one of the Councilors from each ward at each election time was required (Chapter 6)Elections held first Tuesday of May, yearly.Two Councilors shall hold office for two years, for each wardWarden shall hold office for one year.Warden and one Councilor from each ward …

1873: An Act to Incorporate the Town of Dartmouth More…

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https://decisions.scc-csc.ca/scc-csc/scc-csc/en/item/14854/index.do A mandamus was applied for, at the Instance of the Sessions for the County of Halifax, to compel the Warden and Council of the Town of Dartmouth to assess on the property of the town liable for assessment the sum of $15,076 for its proportion of County School Rates for the years 1873-1878, under section 62 of the Educational Act, Revised Statutes, chapter 32. Held, that the Warden and Town Council ought to have assessed in each year for the proportion of the County school assessment payable by the town, but that in view of the act to amend …

Queen v. Town Council of Dartmouth More…