“WHITE HUNTERS TRESPASSED on the Dartmouth farm of Mr. Fuller, a “coloured man”, in March 1818. Fuller demanded that they vacate his property immediately, but the hunters claimed that they were on common land which belonged to no single individual or family. Fuller and the hunters traded insults, then blows. Mrs. Fuller and her children responded to the fighting with a volley of rocks which struck the hunters, prompting them to draw their guns and to order the family to retreat. Mrs. Fuller, though, defiantly informed the trespassers that the land was “our own, we are not now in the …

“We Can Do As We Like Here”: An Analysis of Self Assertion and Agency Among Black Refugees in Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1813-1821 More…

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Just a random history podcast about American History – and wouldn’t you know – it pertains to Dartmouth. Alan Taylor, the Thomas Jefferson chair of American history at the University of Virginia, is a two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for United States history and the author of seven books, most recently “The Internal Enemy: Slavery and war in Virginia 1772 to 1832. Here he relays the beginnings of his latest book: ———- “…I started out from an unusual direction in that I was doing a book about Canada and the United States during the era of the War of …

Dartmouth connections to Slavery & War of 1812 More…

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“In the War of 1812, several United States naval officers were taken prisoners and sent to Halifax for safe keeping. These were generally quartered on the eastern side of the harbor, and those of them who were on parole were lodged in the farmhouses in or near Preston and Dartmouth.They were allowed perfect liberty of action, except in the matter of crossing the ferry to Halifax, the town being the only point from which they could hope to escape.They were all quiet, gentlemanlike men, and were cordially entertained and much liked by the farmers and their families, and they were …

War of 1812 More…

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