The following is from the definitive Dartmouth digest, ‘The Story of Dartmouth’ by Dr. John P. Martin On the morning of Thursday, December 6th, 1917, a munitions ship named the “Mont Blanc” steamed up from the harbor mouth where she had anchored overnight. Her murderous cargo consisted of deadly TNT, tons of picric acid and a deck load of benzoyl drums. About the same time, the Norwegian steamer “Imo’ chartered for Belgian relief purposes, came out of Bedford Basin. At the Narrows, these two vessels came into collision. The cause was never known. There was neither fog nor haze. A …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Lyle’s historic shipyard was located just south of the present Shipyards, on that stretch of shore below the railway line paralleling Cunard Street. Besides owning water lots there, Lyle purchased from Samuel Cunard the triangular piece of land now bounded by Prince, South and the waterfront. Lyle’s shipyard started about 1823. The era of wooden shipbuilding, which lasted over a century, began to develop about this time. The shipyard of John Chappell, established prior to that of Alexander Lyle, is thought to have been on the shore where now stand …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Dartmouth collected over $1,000 for the Springhill Mine Disaster fund in 1891. The Dominion decennial census gave our population as 6,252. The Statistical Year Book gave it as 4,576. Newspaper comment was that the first mentioned figure must have included the whole polling district, and the 4,576 was for Dartmouth municipality only. (Compare the 1881 and 1901 census.) Dartmouth professional speed skaters of that era included Charles Moore, “Si” Faulkner, “Bob” Patterson and George Misener, Some fast amateur skaters were Ted Graham, Bud Swaffer, Jack Warner, Arch Mosher, William Foston, …

1891 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: From this point onward in our story, some word pictures of life in Dartmouth can be given from personal recollection. On May 1st, 1890, our seven-member family moved from “Asylum Road’’ to the roomy Quaker-built house at Sterns’ corner. The front door was on Portland Street. The premises had just been vacated by Frank Mowatt, grocer. Downstairs in the shop my father sold candy, tobacco, hop beer and table beer on draught. We served oysters on the half-shell which cost about a dollar a barrel and yielded a handsome profit. …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In June of 1877 when a disastrous fire destroyed a great part of St. John, N. B., the Dartmouth Town Council in special session appointed a citizens’ committee to collect food, clothing and funds for the relief of sufferers. Those selected were Peter McNab, J. E. Leadley, W. S. Symonds, George Shiels, Dr. Cogswell, James Reeves, John Forbes, Paul Farrell, J. D. VanBuskirk, T. A. Hyde, G. A. S. Crichton and Frederick Scarfe. The Treasurer was G. A. MacKenzie. They collected nearly $2,600. At the July examinations of the Dartmouth …

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: By 1842, when Dartmouth was nearly 100 years old, there still seemed to be no regular system of mail transportation. About that time, a resident complained to the newspapers that letters from abroad, addressed to Dartmouth, were detained at Halifax until nearly half a bushel had accumulated. Then they were sent over by a carrier who charged one penny on each letter for his trouble. There was no recognized Post Office in Dartmouth until about 1870. Instead there was a “way office”. In small centers, such as ours, letters were …

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