“This paper, read in part before the Nova Scotia Historical Society on March 18, 1898, is an attempt to supply a missing chapter in Canadian history — a sombre and unattractive chapter, it may be, but necessary nevertheless to the completeness of our records. If instances given seem too numerous, it must be remembered that the scepticism of many of the best informed Provincials as to the presence at any time of Negro slaves on the soil of Canada has challenged the production, on the part of the author, of more repeated facts than he would otherwise have deemed necessary. …

“The Slave in Canada” More…

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“Disaster is frequently the parent of legislation. In surveying the long history of Nova Scotia, we find this saying particularly true.” “The first recorded instance of illness in Nova Scotia is the account of Champlain of an outbreak of scurvy at Port Royal in 1606. His group of settlers had spent the winter of 1605 at St. Croix Island, where, of a group of seventy-nine, forty-four died of scurvy. In Port Royal in the following year twelve of forty-five died.” “Of all the epidemics, that of smallpox carried with it the greatest destruction and terror. In 1694 an epidemic was …

The Development of Public Health in Nova Scotia More…

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“When, in 1750, La Loutre, the missionary priest, organized the raid on the little settlement at Dartmouth, the village at the Crossing Place saw the gathering of the tribes, and may also have seen the bloody trophies which the Indians carried on their return. An English officer and his men visited Hebert in 1754: We forded the Shubenacadie where the Stewiacke or Torbay river falls into it to a village called Pierre Hebert. This is a fine settlement, has a vast quantity of the best marshlands belonging to it …. We came so suddenly upon the inhabitants that they had …

History in a Valley More…

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“Answer to the Ambassador of France, or rather Mons. Le Bourne, his claim to Acadia and Nova Scotia.” The claims of England to Pentagoet, St. John’s, Port Royal, and La Have, as first possessed by the subjects of that King, and granted to Sir Wm. Alexander and La Tour. The hostile proceedings of Le Bourne in August last, in forcibly taking possession of La Have ; his barbarous usage of the English, turning them upon an island to live upon grass and wade in the water for lobsters to keep them alive, and imprisoning them at Rochelle. That Nova Scotia …

America and West Indies Colonial Papers: February 1662 More…

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It has been the Mi’kmaq who have inhabited these lands, for at least 11,000 years if we are to base settlement on radiocarbon dating and archaeological remains (such as the site near Debert). No discussion on the deinstitutionalization of Dartmouth can occur without recognition of, without reflection on, the colonization of Miꞌkmaꞌki, part of the Wabanaki Confederacy, the ongoing genocides by European Settlers, a region that had its own people, culture, and system of governance, pre-contact. For an idea of what the region looked like geographically and climactically since glacial times, check this out. The following is a sample of …

Punamu’kwati’jk: Salmon Place More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: In April a house was commenced for Arthur W. Godfrey “on the other side of Geyro’s”. George A. S. Crichton, finished enough of “The Brae” at Mount Pleasant, to live there that summer. On part of her late father’s property at the tanyard, Miss Annie Albro had a neat dwelling erected, which she called “Grove Cottage”, and later on, leased it to her brother and his bride. The scene from Mount Pleasant was described as being very beautiful with the cottages on the opposite hills, and the rows of wigwams …

1844 More…

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From The Story of Dartmouth, by Dr. John P. Martin: Dartmouth, long before the European explorers and colonizing forces, had a 7,000 year history of occupation by the Mi’kmaq people. The Mi’kmaq annual cycle of seasonal movement; living in dispersed interior camps during the winter, and larger coastal communities during the summer; meant there were no permanent communities in the Euro-centric sense, but Dartmouth was clearly a place frequented by Mi’kmaq people for a very long time. Whether it was the Springtime smelt spawning in March; the harvesting of spawning herring, gathering eggs and hunting geese in April; the Summer …

Before 1750, Pre-English Settlement More…

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