On moving the eleventh resolution, on the 3rd of March (1837), Mr. Howe made a speech that is worth preserving, for various reasons. Those who defended the old system of government assumed, first, that the institutions of the United States had failed to secure liberty and happiness, and that by yielding responsible government, republican institutions would be at once introduced. Mr. Howe combated both these arguments. While he did justice to our neighbours, and ascribed to the practical working of their purely elective institutions the great prosperity and freedom which they enjoyed, he showed that responsible government was not republicanism, …

Speech on Elective Councils (Senate) More…

Perhaps the most racist and bigoted book or pamphlet I’ve ever seen, the roots of, and the nature of “Canadian nationalism” are clear for all to see. Eugenics is posited throughout as the solution to various social ills, such as poverty and insanity (in furtherance to the ideas of stirpiculture brought to Halifax by Dr. Reid just before the coup known as “Confederation”). Calls for indefinite terms for “the insane” at the Nova Scotia hospital as well as for criminals at penitentiaries, I wonder how captivated the Dartmouthians of the literary society were when taking in these ideas. Propaganda like …

Building up a Canadian nationality More…

“When Halifax was first settled, this side of the harbor was the home and hunting ground of the [Mi’kmaq people]. Soon after the settlement of Halifax, Major Gillman built a saw mill in Dartmouth Cove on the stream flowing from the Dartmouth lakes. On September 30th 1749, the [Indigenous people] attacked and killed four and captured one out of six unarmed men who were cutting wood near Gillman’s mill. In August 1750, the Alderney, of 504 tons, arrived at Halifax with 353 immigrants, a town was laid out on the eastern side of the harbor in the autumn, given the …

The story of Christ Church, Dartmouth More…

“The colonies now belonging to the Crown of Great Britain, exclusive of those under the government of the East India Company, (to which this work does not profess to extend,) are as follows: In the West Indies and South America: Antigua, including Barbuda Barbadoes British Guiana Dominica Grenada Jamaica Montserrat Navis St. Christopher’s, including Anguilla St. Lucia St. Vincent Tobago Trinidad Virgin Islands In North America, continental and insular: Bahama Islands The Bermuda, or Somer’s Islands Canada, Lower Canada, Upper Prince Edward’s Island New Brunswick Newfoundland, with part of Labrador Nova Scotia, including Cape Breton Africa: Cape of Good Hope …

A summary of colonial law More…

“In the Royal Charter granted in 1621 to Sir William Alexander lies the origin of Nova Scotia as a Province and of the name it bears. It is with the conditions leading up to this grant and consequent upon it, as well as with the Charter itself, that the present article is concerned.” “The grant was to Sir William, his heirs, and assigns, or “to any other that will join with him in the whole or in any part thereof,” to be held of the crown as part of Scotland. The royal warrant was signed by the King at Windsor …

Nova Scotia’s Charter More…

Since this is posted to the internet, and it has been indexed by Google, it is a little late to prevent circulation as requested at the beginning of the document. Definitely worth a read if you’d like to gain a greater understanding about this oft-neglected part of early Nova Scotian history. Reid, John G. “The Lost Colony of New Scotland and its Successors, to 1670” Saint Mary’s University Conference, March 26-27, 2004, http://www.mceas.org/Reid.pdf

(See also: https://cityofdartmouth.ca/nova-scotias-charter/) (Translated by the Rev, Carlos Slafter, A.M., of Dedham). JAMES, by the grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, ‘and Defender of the Faith, to all good men, clerical and lay, of his entire realm,—greeting. Know ye, that we have always been eager to embrace every opportunity to promote the honour and wealth of our Kingdom of Scotland, and think that no gain is easier or more safe, than what 1s made by planting new colonies in foreign and uncultivated regions where the means of living and food abound; especially, if these places were …

Charter In Favor Of Sir William Alexander, Knight, Of The Lordship And Barony Of New Scotland In America More…

“I have also thought it due to the pioneers in the religious development of Nova Scotia to give a brief sketch of the establishment of the five great denominations, the Roman Catholics, Presbyterians, Baptists, Church of England and Methodists – who comprise in their membership nearly all the population of the province, where the Church has always exercised a powerful influence on the social and moral conditions of a country where the Puritan and English element of New England has, in the course of over a century, intermingled with English, Scotch and Irish and given birth to the “Nova Scotian.”” …

Builders of Nova Scotia More…

A book with what appears to be the most bigoted account of the Mi’kmaq people I’ve read yet, out of quite a few bigoted accounts and rantings.. Just a heads up if you’re sensitive and you decide to delve into this one. “Since 1749 Nova Scotia has been governed by: General Hopson in 1752 Governor Lawrence in 1756 Rd. Monckson, Esq. Aug 17, 1757 Justice A. Belcher Oct. 1761 Gov. Wilmot, 1763, died 1766 Hon. Michael Franklin, Lieut.-Gov. 1766, continued two months Gov. Francis Legge 1773 Lieut-Gov. Arbuthnot 1776 Lieut.-Gov Richard Huhges 1778 Lieut.-Gov Sir And. Hammond 1781 John Parr, …

A brief description of Nova Scotia with plates of the principal harbors More…

“The beauty and the safety of this (Halifax) harbor attracted the notice of speculators at a very early period, and many applications were at different times made, for a grant of land in its vicinity. The famous projector, Captain Coram, was engaged in 1718, in a scheme for settling here; and a petition was presented by Sir Alexander Cairn, James Douglas, and Joshua Gee, in behalf of themselves and others, praying for a grant upon the sea coast, five leagues S.W. and five leagues N.W. of Chebucto, upon condition of building a town, improving the country around it, be raising …

An historical and statistical account of Nova Scotia More…