If you don’t have Wood’s “Creation of the American Republic” in your library, I highly recommend you pick up a copy. It has been invaluable to me for putting into context so much of what was happening throughout the British colonies at the time of the revolution – many of the forces at work being identical in Nova Scotia, though perhaps in different proportions of Whig to Tory, dissident to loyalist. This passage on the Power of appointment still holds true today, perhaps more so than ever before, with so many of the political positions in Canada existing as the appointments of a completely irresponsible executive, the Prime Minister. A Prime Minister who appoints “all the ministers and parliamentary secretaries, the deputy ministers, senators, the head of state …

The Power of Appointment Read More…

More time is spent describing Dartmouth here than in many other similar books of its kind, yet another instance of 1756 being given as the date of Dartmouth’s “destruction” at the hands of the Mi’kmaq. The timing of the “attack”, 1756, in regards to the delay of the institution of representative government at Halifax until 1758; the requirement of a population of 25 qualified electors in 1757 in order to qualify for a representative in the legislature, which become 50 qualified electors by 1758; all these points, when put together, have always struck me as curious. Earlier events, such as the arrival and settlement of various “wastrels” as well as the “King’s bad bargains” has led me to question whether it was the Mi’kmaq who were involved in …

A Plan of National Colonization Read More…

I give no countenance to slavery of course, this post doesn’t constitute support, overt or implied, for the principles that once legitimized it. At the same time, there are arguments in this pamphlet that seem almost prophetic, not only towards States, but certainly in regards to Canada. The argument that “if they please, (they may make) of the whole Union a single State, and of the States mere Counties” certainly applies to the Constitutional situation in Nova Scotia. Once a proto-state in 1775, devolved into a colony of the Province of Canada by 1867, whose Senate was dissolved by fiat in 1928, whose municipal corporations were dissolved by fiat in 1996, now existing as a colony in a colony of colonies masquerading as a country, with counties masquerading …

State or province? Bond or free? Read More…

This is shared less for its specific relevance to Nova Scotian politics, more so for the graphical way in which it captures party politics, especially as it relates to the colonial situation leading up to the revolution and the Whig and Tory politics immediately thereafter. This graphic would be somewhat reversed if Nova Scotia were its subject, where Whigs were not in the majority, where a crown was always ready to counteract “the danger of leveling Republican principles”, where the political sky has been clouded over with an exclusively Tory (aka Loyalist), Canadian patina, regardless of party; where the Colonial still holds sway to this day. Proto-Whigs and their particularist ideals lived on in Nova Scotia, as seen in Howe and the push for “Responsible government”, whereas since …

Conspectus of American Politics Read More…