“the inhabitants of the town plot of Dartmouth” Chapter 6 of the Acts of 1789, “An act to enable the Inhabitants of the Town Plot of Dartmouth to use and occupy the Common Field, granted them by his excellency the Lieutenant-Governor, in such way as they may think most beneficial to them”http://0-nsleg–edeposit.gov.ns.ca.legcat.gov.ns.ca/deposit/Statutes/at_large/volume1/1789.pdf “Common of the town of Dartmouth…the common of the township of dartmouth… Inhabitants settled and resident in the town plot… Within the township of Dartmouth” Chapter 2 of the Acts of 1797, “An act to enable the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, or Commander in chief for the time being, …

Body politic, Body corporate; City limits. More…

“News Release Archive COMMUNITY SERVICES–MUNICIPAL ASSISTANCE Community Services Minister Jim Smith said today that he was hopeful that the new Halifax Regional Municipality would accept the offer to takeover delivery of all municipal social assistance programs on April 1, 1996. “It’s a good deal for the new municipality. At a time of federal budget cutting this plan fixes the municipal costs at predictable levels.” The pilot program will offer greater efficiency through full-service offices. “Right now someone needing assistance in Dartmouth travels to Young Street in Halifax for provincial family benefits and to the West End Mall for employment and …

“greater efficiency” More…

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“Isaac Deschamps and James Brenton, puisne judges of the Nova Scotia Supreme Court [NSSC], had, charged the colonial Assembly in April 1790, committed “divers illegal, partial, and corrupt acts” such as to justify “Impeachment” for “High Crimes and Misdemeanours.”‘ These words come from the preamble to a list of seven “articles of impeachment” passed by the Nova Scotia Assembly on 5-7 April 1790. The seven articles, distilled from thirteen draft articles which had been introduced on 10 March, listed ten cases in which the judges were alleged to have acted incompetently or partially, or both, and also included accusations that …

The Impeachment of the Judges of the Nova Scotia Supreme Court, 1787-1793: Colonial Judges, Loyalist Lawyers, and the Colonial Assembly More…

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“One reason to use the language of a coup is that people know it’s wrong and a violation of Democratic norms — even if they’re not familiar with the exact definition of a coup. We have to be ready to declare loudly and strongly: This is a coup. Even when only a few people go along with the coup, and act as though that’s normal, people may reluctantly accept it as inevitable. In all research on preventing coups, there’s one common theme: People stop doing what coup plotters tell them to do”

https://decisions.scc-csc.ca/scc-csc/scc-csc/en/item/14854/index.do A mandamus was applied for, at the Instance of the Sessions for the County of Halifax, to compel the Warden and Council of the Town of Dartmouth to assess on the property of the town liable for assessment the sum of $15,076 for its proportion of County School Rates for the years 1873-1878, under section 62 of the Educational Act, Revised Statutes, chapter 32. Held, that the Warden and Town Council ought to have assessed in each year for the proportion of the County school assessment payable by the town, but that in view of the act to amend …

Queen v. Town Council of Dartmouth More…

“For communities that consolidated services, overall expenditures increased in some circumstances and expenditure reductions were only associated with one service: capacity management.” From: “A longitudinal analysis of the effects of service consolidation on local government expenditures”, Craig S Maher, Public Administration Quarterly Vol. 39, No. 3 (FALL 2015), pp. 393-425

“The removal of one’s ‘own’ municipality can be hard to accept, especially if this region does not seem to be facing any immediate economic threats and the merger is justified only by using vague arguments such as abstract neo-liberal rhetoric of competitiveness. Under these circumstances defensive resistance movements emerge.” “When old and new regionalism collide. Deinstitutionalization of regions and resistance identity in municipality amalgamations”, Zimmerbauer & Paasi, 2013

“One of the greatest threats to Municipal Autonomy and the principle of Local self-governance today…is and remains the coercive amalgamation of municipalities, i.e. forcing of municipalities together without the consent of either their governments or the people.” “The idea of a Democracy is that at its basis is the autonomous citizen, capable of making choices. As long as we retain this idea, he or she must make their own decisions in fundamental matters… they cannot be delegated, because there is no expert knowledge, no truth that would count.” “Coercive municipal amalgamation is therefore not only generally inefficient and ineffective; it is …

“Coercive Municipal Amalgamation Today” More…

“In our opinion these financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Corporation of the City of Dartmouth as at March 31, 1996 and the results of its operations and the changes in its capital position for the year then ended in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles adopted for Nova Scotia Municipalities.” The final financial statement of the City of Dartmouth is a great starting point for those who fail to understand the outrage over Nova Scotia’s 1996 municipal coup, aka “amalgamation”, in the parlance of our permanent ruling class. It also presents a …

City of Dartmouth Auditor’s Report, 1996 More…

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Andrew Sancton in Merger Mania credits Britain in the late 1950s with the dawn of local government reform among liberal democracies. More than one royal commission (Report of the Royal Commission on Local Government in Greater London, 1957-60 – also known as the Herbert Report, and Radcliffe-Maud a decade later in 1968) were undertaken first, to examine (and then implement) amalgamation in London’s boroughs and to create the Greater London Council. Radcliffe-Maud in 1968 would deal with other amalgamative possibilities throughout the rest of Britain. Sancton states that this Redcliffe-Maud commission: “…is significant in many ways, one of which it …

Amalgamation: The Road to Serfdom More…

James Vaughan, President of the Halifax Homeowners Association, called for a plebiscite to be held on the matter of the proposed amalgamation. Council authorized a letter to the Minister of Municipal Affairs to advise that Halifax City Council was prepared to conduct a plebiscite on amalgamation providing the Province was prepared to accept the results of that plebiscite. There is no record of a response from the Department of Municipal Affairs. (Halifax City Council Minutes, 1994/95)

“The constitution” “unconstitutional”, what is Nova Scotia’s constitutional framework? People typically think of our Constitution Act of 1982, also known as the Charter (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/Const/page-15.html#h-38), or perhaps the BNA Act of 1867 (http://www.justice.gc.ca/…/constit…/lawreg-loireg/p1t11.html), but many do not consider Nova Scotia’s constitution. “One must appreciate an important historical fact: the constitutional heritage of the country is older than the country itself. This is so because several of the provinces that would eventually become part of the Dominion of Canada had their own colonial constitutions before Confederation – before the enactment of Canada’s federal constitution in the form of the British North America …

Constitutional Framework: Reference Points More…