An excellent map from 1808, and one of the only maps to show the location of “Fort Duncan” in Dartmouth, whatever was left of it would’ve likely been obliterated by the construction of the bridge which also just happened to bisect Dartmouth’s Common land. 🤔

A particularly clear representation of the townships in Halifax County. As an aside, the Township of Dartmouth was seemingly “lost” around the time of the 1867 coup otherwise known as “confederation”, which seems to have helped to spur the push for the incorporation of the Town of Dartmouth by 1873. What remained of the township of Dartmouth seemingly reverted to “Halifax County”, an entity “neither a corporation nor an individual capable of instituting proceedings”, according to Rigby Q.C., barrister for Dartmouth, as recently as 1880. The success of this case at the Supreme Court of Canada is mentioned in the Town’s Annual Report of 1886: https://cityofdartmouth.ca/annual-report-1886/

“The first municipal institution built to house the county’s poor and mentally ill was constructed in about 1887 in Cole Harbor.” https://www.memoryns.ca/halifax-n-s-county-halifax-county-home-and-mental-hospital

After piecing together several Crown land grant maps, you can see the path of the Old Annapolis Road much more clearly. Open the image in a new tab, to see it in more detail. Below you’ll find a few representations of the road as a contiguous route, as opposed to what is left recorded on the Crown Land Grant maps. (You can find find the individual Crown Land Grant maps here: https://novascotia.ca/natr/land/grantmap.asp) One of the earliest road maps, from 1755. “A New map of Nova Scotia and Cape Britain”, https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b53089581f An excellent early road map from 1768. “Map of Nova Scotia, or Acadia, with the islands of Cape Breton and St. John’s, from actual surveys” https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b53209890m Previous to the construction of the more direct route to Annapolis, this …

Old Annapolis Road Read More…

From: Halifax Habour, Surveyed by Staff Commander W.F. Maxwell, R.N., Assisted by Staff Commanders F.W. Jarrad and P.H. Wright, R.N. 1889. The Narrows from a Canadian Government Survey, 1916. The Topography is taken from the Royal Engineers plans, with corrections and additions from the Hydrographic Department, Ottawa, 1916. Soundings in Feet, Natural Scale 1/10,560. https://memoryns.ca/halifax-harbour-1990

From: Topographical township map of Halifax County, Nova Scotia / from actual surveys made, drawn, & engraved by and under the direction of H.F. Walling. Map of Nova Scotia and adjacent provinces, Creator: Walling, Henry Francis, 1825-1888, Publication Date: 1864, Map Publisher: A.F. Church and Co. https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agdm/id/14725/rec/1

From: Topographical township map of Halifax County, Nova Scotia / from actual surveys made, drawn, & engraved by and under the direction of H.F. Walling. Map of Nova Scotia and adjacent provinces, Creator: Walling, Henry Francis, 1825-1888, Publication Date: 1864, Map Publisher: A.F. Church and Co. https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agdm/id/14725/rec/1

“As a man, as well as a map-maker, Ambrose F. Church was an interesting figure. He retained his United States citizenship even though he resided in Nova Scotia for many years. It is alleged that he was a deserter from the United States army and that that was one reason why he came to Nova Scotia and never returned to the United States to live. He was not only a respected resident of Nova Scotia but a great family man…” “When Ambrose Finson Church moved from Maine to Nova Scotia in 1865, he had a wife and one daughter, Alice Isabel. Probably after living in Halifax for a time, they took up residence at Ochterloney Street in Dartmouth by 1868. There they lived until they moved to Bedford, …

Ambrose F. Church, Map-Maker Read More…

“2000 Killed, Thousands Injured, When French Munitions Vessel Explodes In Harbor of Halifax, Wrecking the City. Buildings Collapse From Shock and Flames Break Out as Mont Blanc, Struck by Belgian Relief Steamer Imo, Blows Up. Two Square Miles of City Territory Devestated; Scores Burn to Death; Fatally Injured Crown Hospitals; Crews of Both Ships Escape: By the Associated Press. Halifax, Nova Scotia. Dec. 6 – Probably 2,000 persons were killed, according to careful estimates tonight, when the French munitions ship Mont Blanc blew up in Halifax harbor after a collision with the Norwegian steamship Imo, carrying Belgian relief supplies, at 9 o’clock this morning. Thousands were injured and it is expected many of them will die. The Ioma (sic) was beached. Had Cargo of 5,000 Tons: Virtually all …

The Halifax Explosion as covered by the Washington Post, Friday Dec 7, 1917 Read More…

An interesting map of Dartmouth from around 1955. It’s quite detailed – in many cases aspirational. Check out the subdivision plan for what is now Mic Mac Mall – below the modern grid they had once hoped to construct, you can see the makeup of “The Avenue” quite clearly, a rarity for maps of the Dartmouth area. A whole plan for Manor Park that didn’t come to pass is included too. Alderney Drive was yet to be rammed through the downtown, and the original street grid is, for the most part, still present. What would’ve happened if the Province hadn’t strangled Dartmouth’s configuration with the 111 highway? We will never know, but we get an inkling thanks to this map. See also:

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