From: Halifax Habour, Surveyed by Staff Commander W.F. Maxwell, R.N., Assisted by Staff Commanders F.W. Jarrad and P.H. Wright, R.N. 1889. The Narrows from a Canadian Government Survey, 1916. The Topography is taken from the Royal Engineers plans, with corrections and additions from the Hydrographic Department, Ottawa, 1916. Soundings in Feet, Natural Scale 1/10,560. https://memoryns.ca/halifax-harbour-1990

From: Topographical township map of Halifax County, Nova Scotia / from actual surveys made, drawn, & engraved by and under the direction of H.F. Walling. Map of Nova Scotia and adjacent provinces, Creator: Walling, Henry Francis, 1825-1888, Publication Date: 1864, Map Publisher: A.F. Church and Co. https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agdm/id/14725/rec/1

From: Topographical township map of Halifax County, Nova Scotia / from actual surveys made, drawn, & engraved by and under the direction of H.F. Walling. Map of Nova Scotia and adjacent provinces, Creator: Walling, Henry Francis, 1825-1888, Publication Date: 1864, Map Publisher: A.F. Church and Co. https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agdm/id/14725/rec/1

“As a man, as well as a map-maker, Ambrose F. Church was an interesting figure. He retained his United States citizenship even though he resided in Nova Scotia for many years. It is alleged that he was a deserter from the United States army and that that was one reason why he came to Nova Scotia and never returned to the United States to live. He was not only a respected resident of Nova Scotia but a great family man…” “When Ambrose Finson Church moved from Maine to Nova Scotia in 1865, he had a wife and one daughter, Alice …

Ambrose F. Church, Map-Maker More…

This study of a lake in Lunenburg County gives us a good idea of Nova Scotia’s historical climate, vegetation and habitation potential since the last Ice Age, and the animation below illustrates some of the changes noted in the following paper abstract. Abstract: A high-resolution, multi-proxy lake sediment record was used to establish the timing of Holocene environmental change in Canoran Lake, southwest Nova Scotia, Canada. Canoran Lake is a small, shallow (11 m) lake with two ephemeral inlets and an outlet. The site was deglaciated at ca. 15,300 cal (calibrated) year BP and elevated %C values indicate the establishment …

Post-glacial climate change and its effect on a shallow dimictic lake in Nova Scotia, Canada More…

An interesting map of Dartmouth, circa 1950 (1955 at least I would think, since the bridge is shown). It’s quite detailed – in many cases aspirational. Check out the subdivision plan for what is now Mic Mac Mall – below the modern grid they had once hoped to construct, you can see the makeup of “The Avenue” quite clearly, a rarity for maps of the Dartmouth area. A whole plan for Manor Park that didn’t come to pass is included too. Alderney Drive was yet to be rammed through the downtown, and the original street grid is, for the most …

Dartmouth, Before being strangled by a Beltway More…

Here is one of, if not the earliest plan available showing Old Ferry Road, which became the Lawrencetown Road. Now, Old Ferry Road, Portland Street and Cole Harbour Road.These surveys offer a lot of information and they’re surprisingly accurate!

Part of the Town & Harbour of Halifax in Nova Scotia, Looking down George Street to the Opposite Shore Called Dartmouth (1759, Mason, James, 1710-c.1783) https://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/detail.jsp?Entt=RDMDC-X76-19&R=DC-X76-19&fbclid=IwAR0B4V19DVaVrbvjG7fa8qju9RMnRUvauOvrHv3YrQUV8L8K15KEZw_-Tps One distinct record from the year of 1759 survives:“Mrs. Mary Clark, whose house and garden stood at the southeast corner of the present Portland and King Streets, advised Secretary Richard Bulkeley that her “three lots have been improved, cleared and fenced-in twice but all the improvements, fences, etc., have been taken away and burnt by the Army and Navy”.

Crown Land Grants are an invaluable historical resource, and you can learn a lot about how Dartmouth developed by following the patterns from the subdivision of these tracts. https://novascotia.ca/natr/land/grantmap.asp?fbclid=IwAR0mjbyLGcHoUf7YIgk06mXbjKQyqdT6SHjtKTp5SNSRkVrXRpeN2dE6uxs The map itself is a 1940s era base-map and so you’ll see the original configuration of many once rural now suburban roads. Beyond the Land Grant Map Index, individual grants also have records of their own, and sometimes maps to go along with them. Included here is a map from Seth Coleman in 1790 – who was Clerk of the Dartmouth Meeting of Friends (The Quaker Fellowship). He owned the land …

Crown Land Grant Records More…

This is the lower part of Old Ferry Road, once known as “Green Lane”. The curve in the foreground leads to the Old Ferry Wharf, in the background is the hill to Pleasant Street and Portland Street. The fence on the left enclosed the South End Lawn Tennis Courts, and from there to the shore stood Regal willow trees. Two of them were named for King George III and Queen Charlotte, and two others for Mr. and Mrs. James Creighton of “Brooklands” who had them planted perhaps in the late 1700’s. When this picture was taken about 1900, they were …

Green Lane More…