“Disaster is frequently the parent of legislation. In surveying the long history of Nova Scotia, we find this saying particularly true.” “The first recorded instance of illness in Nova Scotia is the account of Champlain of an outbreak of scurvy at Port Royal in 1606. His group of settlers had spent the winter of 1605 at St. Croix Island, where, of a group of seventy-nine, forty-four died of scurvy. In Port Royal in the following year twelve of forty-five died.” “Of all the epidemics, that of smallpox carried with it the greatest destruction and terror. In 1694 an epidemic was …

The Development of Public Health in Nova Scotia More…

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“Writing in the posthumously published final version of his historical chronicle of early Halifax town, lawyer-archivist Thomas Beamish Akins condemned the infamous 1820 state trial, R. v. Wilkie, in these memorable words: An anonymous pamphlet was published from the press of A.H. [Anthony Henry] Holland, charging the magistrates of the town with malpractices, which caused much excitement. It was discovered to have been written by Mr. William Wilkie, of Halifax. He was indicted for libel, tried at the Easter term of the Supreme Court [17 April 1820] and sentenced to two years imprisonment with hard labor in the House of …

Sedition in Nova Scotia: R. v. Wilkie (1820) and the Incontestable Illegality of Seditious Libel before R. v. Howe (1835) More…

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“Nova Scotia had found [in Joseph Howe] not only its John Wilkes but also its Charles James Fox.” — W.S. MacNutt, 1965 “In a seminal article published in 1974, Kenneth McNaught described Howe as one of Canada’s “two most significant cases involving political freedom of the press” — the other being Dixon for seditious libel arising from the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919. McNaught failed to mention an important early New Brunswick case (Hooper, 1830), where the proprietor-editor of the British Colonist (Saint John) was prosecuted for seditious libel after publishing, under the author’s suggestive Puritan nom-de-plume (“Hampden”), a letter …

Sedition In Nova Scotia: R. v. Howe and the “Contested Legality” of Seditious Libel More…

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“Within the constituencies, too, the Conservative gains appear to have been quite uniform. Robert McCleave and Michael Forrestall improved their party’s fortunes by comparable amounts throughout the City of Halifax, the City of Dartmouth, and the municipality of the County of Halifax.” Beck, J. Murray “The Electoral Behaviour of Nova Scotia in 1965” Dalhousie Review, Volume 46, Number 1, 1966 https://dalspace.library.dal.ca/bitstream/handle/10222/59079/dalrev_vol46_iss1_pp29_38.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

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“The Telephone Utility is one of the oldest and largest public utilities, and perhaps the one which comes into direct contact with the most people in their workaday lives. The telephone was invented in 1876 by Alexander Graham Bell, a man well and favourably known in Nova Scotia, as during the last years of his life he made his home in Cape Breton, just outside of Baddeck. The first telephone in Halifax was installed in 1877, and the first actual commercial use of the service was at the Caledonia Mine, Cape Breton, also in the same year. At this time …

Public Utility Regulation in Nova Scotia More…

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“Prior to 1888 eight towns were incorporated. These were Dartmouth, (1873), Pictou (1874), New Glasgow (1875), Windsor (1878), North Sydney (1885), Sydney (1885), and Kentville (1886), each of which was incorporated by special Act.” “The Towns Incorporation Act of Nova Scotia was passed in 1888, revised in 1895, and embodied in the consolidation of 1900 and the revised statutes of 1954. It requires a majority vote of the ratepayers of the town in support of incorporation before it can be granted. It also requires a certain population within a specified area-in 1954 a population of over 1500 within an area …

Local Government in Nova Scotia More…

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Another work in progress, I hope to tie the legislative record to debates, votes, as well as Council debates and votes together for easier reference. Tuesday, 20th December 1785: Bill for establishing a free ferry, read a first and second time “Mr. Wallace presented the Draft of a Bill for establishing a free Ferry between Halifax and Dartmouth, which was read a first and second time, and ordered to be engrossed.” Journal and votes of the House of Assembly for the province of Nova Scotia, 1785 Thursday, December 22d, 1785: The Bill for regulating ferries, &c. read a third time, …

Dartmouth in the Legislature, Journal & votes of the House of Assembly More…

Dartmouth Water Company, Act to incorporate, 1846 c44

(work in progress) Shubenacadie Canal Company, Act to authorize the incorporation of 1824, 1824 c3Act in addition to the same, 1827 c17Act to aid; Annual grant of £1,500, for ten years, 1829 c48For increasing the Capital Stock, the number of Shares, and conferring further powers, 1837 c77 Dartmouth Water Company, Act to incorporate, 1846 c44To amend the same, and increase number of shares, 1847 c56To continue and further amend (1st Session), 1851 c7(see also P. & L. Acts of 1851, pages 217, 223,224) Halifax and Dartmouth Mutual Insurance Company, Act to incorporate, 1850 c9(see also P. & L. Acts of …

Dartmouth in the Legislature, Private Acts 1824-1996 More…

For a copy of any of the sources for the following, in case the original is moved or lost: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1kylpL-kbLbuGzfyHy46JmgG_tPavI1km?usp=sharing (Note, Feb 23 2021: The originals did end up moving since this page was published on September 11, 2020, a hyphen was added to the address of each of the files listed, e.g., https://0-nsleg-edeposit-gov-ns-ca.legcat.gov.ns.ca/deposit/Statutes/1873.pdf became https://0-nsleg–edeposit-gov-ns-ca.legcat.gov.ns.ca/deposit/Statutes/1873.pdf. In addition to this being a work in progress, the links are in the process of being corrected – not sure if that will instigate another change to all of the links…) This is all a work in progress, don’t mind the mess as …

Dartmouth in the Legislature, Public Acts 1789-1996 More…

Some Highlights: (Chapter 3)Dartmouth shall be a corporation consisting of three wards.Dartmouth shall be governed by a council, consisting of a Warden and six Councillors (two for each ward). Quasi-term limits, staggered terms: Wardens had a One year term, while Councilors had two year terms.Also as to who offers at election time, a mandatory turn over of one of the Councilors from each ward at each election time was required (Chapter 6)Elections held first Tuesday of May, yearly.Two Councilors shall hold office for two years, for each wardWarden shall hold office for one year.Warden and one Councilor from each ward …

1873: An Act to Incorporate the Town of Dartmouth More…

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https://decisions.scc-csc.ca/scc-csc/scc-csc/en/item/14854/index.do A mandamus was applied for, at the Instance of the Sessions for the County of Halifax, to compel the Warden and Council of the Town of Dartmouth to assess on the property of the town liable for assessment the sum of $15,076 for its proportion of County School Rates for the years 1873-1878, under section 62 of the Educational Act, Revised Statutes, chapter 32. Held, that the Warden and Town Council ought to have assessed in each year for the proportion of the County school assessment payable by the town, but that in view of the act to amend …

Queen v. Town Council of Dartmouth More…

“Subversion of the Constitution of Nova Scotia”“A fraud upon the Imperial Parliament” Nova Scotia’s third attempt to try and redress the slavery and serfdom that was “confederation” – Dartmouth being central to the effort to repeal Confederation. What happened to Nova Scotia in the context of Canada is exactly what happened to Dartmouth in the context of Halifax County; a structural, constitutional flaw that has only gained steam (and any number of unseemly future possibilities) since. “The petition which I presented to the House makes what to all Englishmen must or ought to be considered a very serious complaint. It …

Subversion of the Constitution of Nova Scotia More…

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