Key to Canada’s modern day ability to perform coup after coup masquerading as legal and constitutional behavior is the “disappearance” of Provincial constitutions, which doesn’t seem to have been accidental, and has enabled a constant and ever worsening tyranny predicated on revisionist history at every level of government. Along with the “unique qualities” of the notwithstanding clause in comparison to other Western constitutions and the “unique qualities” of provincial unicameral ram-fest legislatures are the “unique qualities” of a federalism bereft of sub-national constitutions, which would typically help provide a check on federal omnipotence, part and parcel of Federalism in free …

Provincializing Constitutions: History, Narrative, and the Disappearance of Canada’s Provincial Constitutions More…

Though not explicitly mentioned since it hadn’t yet been claimed or founded as such, parts of Nova Scotia are included in the first charter of Virginia, the second colony of which (otherwise known as the Popham Colony) was defined as the land lying between 38°N and 45°N latitude. Hence, Thomas Jefferson’s notes on cessions of Nova Scotia from Virginia (A grant of Nova Scotia to Sir William Alexander. 1621, Sep. 10-20., A grant of the soil, barony, and domains of Nova Scotia to Sir Wm. Alexander of Minstrie. 1625, July 12) in his Notes on the State of Virginia. JAMES, …

The First Charter of Virginia (1606) More…

This charter is written as one block of text, without punctuation or break, and a lot of “olde English”. I did my best to find any natural breaks in the text, and corrected what are now misspellings in order to ease its legibility. Any mention of Nova Scotia or Acadia are in bold in order to make it easier to pick them out, not as a representation of how they are presented in the original text. GEORGE BY THE GRACE OF GOD of Great Britain France and Ireland king Defender of the Faith &c To all to whom these Presents …

Explanatory Charter of Massachusetts Bay (1725) More…

This charter is written as one block of text, without any punctuation or break, and a lot of “olde English”. I did my best to find the natural breaks in the text, as well as correcting what are now misspellings, in order to ease its legibility. Any mention of Nova Scotia or Acadia are in bold in order to make it easier to pick them out, not because that is how they are presented in the original text. WILLIAM & MARY by the grace of God King and Queen of England Scotland France and Ireland Defenders of the Faith &c …

The Charter of Massachusetts Bay (1691) More…

On moving the eleventh resolution, on the 3rd of March (1837), Mr. Howe made a speech that is worth preserving, for various reasons. Those who defended the old system of government assumed, first, that the institutions of the United States had failed to secure liberty and happiness, and that by yielding responsible government, republican institutions would be at once introduced. Mr. Howe combated both these arguments. While he did justice to our neighbours, and ascribed to the practical working of their purely elective institutions the great prosperity and freedom which they enjoyed, he showed that responsible government was not republicanism, …

Speech on Elective Councils (Senate) More…

“I have also thought it due to the pioneers in the religious development of Nova Scotia to give a brief sketch of the establishment of the five great denominations, the Roman Catholics, Presbyterians, Baptists, Church of England and Methodists – who comprise in their membership nearly all the population of the province, where the Church has always exercised a powerful influence on the social and moral conditions of a country where the Puritan and English element of New England has, in the course of over a century, intermingled with English, Scotch and Irish and given birth to the “Nova Scotian.”” …

Builders of Nova Scotia More…

“Above 70 years’ legislation has accumulated a mass of provincial enactments (contained in 3 large quarto volumes, down to 1826.) Since 1826, very many acts have passed. Much inconvenience has been felt in referring to them, as it requires intimate acquaintance with their contents, to enable any one to distinguish those directly or virtually repealed, from such as remain in force. This difficulty has been experienced by professional men as well as others, although the small Index published by Chief Justice Marshall afforded some remedy. The variety of instances in which our Provincial acts and usages have altered the laws …

Epitome of the laws of Nova Scotia (Volume 1-4) More…

“Hon. Mr. Wilkins, Attorney General, moved the following resolutions on the subject of confederation, in the house of assembly, on the 5th of February: That the members of the Legislative assembly of this Province, elected in 1862 simply to legislate under the colonial constitution, had no authority to make or consent to any material change of such constitution, without first submitting the same to the people at the polls That the resolution of the 10th of April, which preceded the enactment of the British North America Act is as follows Whereas it is the opinion of this house it is …

Debate on resolutions relative to repeal of the “British North America Act” in the House of Assembly of Nova Scotia; session 1868 More…

“That the township of Dartmouth comprehend all the lands lying to the east side of the harbour of Halifax and Bedford Bason (sic), and extending and bounded easterly by the grant to the proprietors of Lawrence Town & extending from the north easterly head of Bedford Bason (sic), until one hundred thousand acres be comprehended” Kennedy, W.P.M. “Statutes, treaties and documents of the Canadian Constitution, 1713-1929 Constitutional documents of Canada” Toronto : Oxford University Press, 1930. https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.9_03428

“This was the first revised edition of Nova Scotia statutes. It contains, session by session, 1758-Oct. 1766, the text of acts passed and still in force, with titles of acts passed but no longer in force. Laws of a temporary character formerly published among the permanent enactments of each session were excluded from this work and published in a separate revised edition (No. 114) a little later. This distinction between Perpetual and Temporary acts was continued in the sessional publications, the laws of each session being published thenceforward in two series, Perpetual and Temporary, paged in continuation of this work …

The perpetual acts of the general assemblies of His Majesty’s province of Nova Scotia More…