“the inhabitants of the town plot of Dartmouth” Chapter 6 of the Acts of 1789, “An act to enable the Inhabitants of the Town Plot of Dartmouth to use and occupy the Common Field, granted them by his excellency the Lieutenant-Governor, in such way as they may think most beneficial to them”http://0-nsleg–edeposit.gov.ns.ca.legcat.gov.ns.ca/deposit/Statutes/at_large/volume1/1789.pdf “Common of the town of Dartmouth…the common of the township of dartmouth… Inhabitants settled and resident in the town plot… Within the township of Dartmouth” Chapter 2 of the Acts of 1797, “An act to enable the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, or Commander in chief for the time being, …

Body politic, Body corporate; City limits. More…

To the Editor of the Sun:Allow me through your valuable paper to make a few remarks which appeared in the “Citizen” this evening, with references to the dastardly murder of President Lincoln.The writer most unblushingly labors to lay the perpetration of this awful crime at the doors of what he terms the “radical Republican party,” saying that “these extremists clamor for the blood of every southerner, and the confiscation of all southern property,” and that they were deeply dissatisfied with the moderate policy lately foreshadowed by Lincoln and Seward.I would like to ask from what source the writer draws his …

“…the dastardly murder of President Lincoln” More…

Tagged with: ,

BUSINESS DIRECTORY FOR DARTMOUTH.OFFICIALS Hon. J.W. Johnston, Judge in EquityHon. Joseph Howe, Commissioner of FisheriesLawrence Hartshorne, City TreasurerCol. Sinclair, A.G.M.James H. Thorne, Dep. Prov. Sec. and Chief Clerk MINISTERSRev. John B. Woods, St. Peter’s ChurchRev. O. M. Grindon, English Church BARRISTERSJ.W. Johnston, Junr, Office, HalifaxAlexander James, Office, HalifaxJ. G. Foster, Office, Halifax PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONST.B. Des Brisay, M.D., corner of King and Quarrel stsR.S. Campbell, M.D., {Dealer in Patent Medicines, Paints, Oils, &c.L.E. Van Buskirk, M.D.W.H. Weeks, King Street MERCHANTSAllan, J.W, Grocer and Dealer in LumberBrown, J.C, {General Dealer in Groceries and Liquors, &c.Bettinsen, J, Groceries and Boarding HouseElliott, J.B., …

Dartmouth Business Directory, 1864 More…

Tagged with: , ,

From: Topographical township map of Halifax County, Nova Scotia / from actual surveys made, drawn, & engraved by and under the direction of H.F. Walling. Map of Nova Scotia and adjacent provinces, Creator: Walling, Henry Francis, 1825-1888, Publication Date: 1864, Map Publisher: A.F. Church and Co. https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agdm/id/14725/rec/1

Tagged with:

From: Topographical township map of Halifax County, Nova Scotia / from actual surveys made, drawn, & engraved by and under the direction of H.F. Walling. Map of Nova Scotia and adjacent provinces, Creator: Walling, Henry Francis, 1825-1888, Publication Date: 1864, Map Publisher: A.F. Church and Co. https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agdm/id/14725/rec/1

Tagged with:

“This paper, read in part before the Nova Scotia Historical Society on March 18, 1898, is an attempt to supply a missing chapter in Canadian history — a sombre and unattractive chapter, it may be, but necessary nevertheless to the completeness of our records. If instances given seem too numerous, it must be remembered that the scepticism of many of the best informed Provincials as to the presence at any time of Negro slaves on the soil of Canada has challenged the production, on the part of the author, of more repeated facts than he would otherwise have deemed necessary. …

“The Slave in Canada” More…

Tagged with: , , , , ,

“WHITE HUNTERS TRESPASSED on the Dartmouth farm of Mr. Fuller, a “coloured man”, in March 1818. Fuller demanded that they vacate his property immediately, but the hunters claimed that they were on common land which belonged to no single individual or family. Fuller and the hunters traded insults, then blows. Mrs. Fuller and her children responded to the fighting with a volley of rocks which struck the hunters, prompting them to draw their guns and to order the family to retreat. Mrs. Fuller, though, defiantly informed the trespassers that the land was “our own, we are not now in the …

“We Can Do As We Like Here”: An Analysis of Self Assertion and Agency Among Black Refugees in Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1813-1821 More…

Tagged with: , , , ,

“Other poetic sequences and photos in The Door of My Heart contribute to these door, gate/ gait and (im)mobility motifs in oblique yet suggestive ways. The sequence “Through My Classroom Door,” reflecting Tynes’ experience as a teacher in a racially mixed high school in Dartmouth, addresses the barriers impeding disadvantaged young people-especially the “young pride of old Africa” among whom “too many stumble … fall from hope. ” The chains that impede these young blacks are invisible, yet nevertheless “coffles of old strike fear into / this new face and / heart of darkness” (89-90). The barriers Tynes’ black students …

The Poet as Whole-Body Camera: Maxine Tynes and the Pluralities of Otherness More…

Tagged with:

“With the Conservatives enthroned at Ottawa under Sir John A. Macdonald, a bye-election in Halifax, already represented by one Conservative in the House of Assembly and by the Conservatives Kenny and Stairs at Ottawa, was no slight undertaking. But it was now or never for Mr. Fielding, and his courage proved equal to the occasion. Happily for him, his opponent indulged in an infelicitous anecdote in the course of his speech in Dartmouth, which in itself must have gone far in the way of accounting for the majority given for him in the election. He told a story at which …

Recollections of W.S. Fielding More…

“THE Cunard family is of German origin. In 1683, Thones Kunders emigrated from Crefeld to Philadelphia, where he was granted land by William Penn himself. His great-grandson, Abraham Cunard, came to Halifax from Philadelphia some time before 1785. He was a carpenter by trade, and obtained employment in the Dock Yard. His wife’s name was Margaret Murphy. She came with a band of Loyalists from South Carolina” “Cunard’s wharf is the centre of the West India trade, and the firm keeps Lyle and Chappell of Dartmouth busy building ships for it and giving employment to hundreds of men. John Cunard …

The Rise of Samuel Cunard More…

MR. JUSTICE JOHNSTONE My earliest recollection of the late Judge Johnston dates back to the years when he was the proprietor of Mount Amelia, which was then a large estate of many acres, but has since been divided up into a number of holdings any one of which is large enough to make forty or fifty ordinary town lots. The judge took a very great interest in his property, planting thorns and cedars which still flourish, and a number of seedlings that have since become magnificent oaks of which he thought a1most as much as of his children. I have …

Reminiscences of the Nova Scotia Judiciary More…

“Nine years later, one finds this institute arranging an excursion to Portland, “under the auspices of the Marine Charitable Mechanics’ Association of Portland”, which brought not only much pleasure, but a £60 profit for the building fund . Dartmouth Mechanics’ Institute, Nova Scotia, arranged a picnic and bazaar, under the patronage of Lieutenant Governor Falkland, on neighbouring McNab’s Island in 1845, and this was recognized as ” the outstanding summer event in the social life of the community.” Four thousand people were conveyed by ferries to a picnic ground, where displays were intermingled with refreshment stands, with music provided by …

The Work/Leisure Ethic in Adult Education More…

Tagged with: ,

“As a man, as well as a map-maker, Ambrose F. Church was an interesting figure. He retained his United States citizenship even though he resided in Nova Scotia for many years. It is alleged that he was a deserter from the United States army and that that was one reason why he came to Nova Scotia and never returned to the United States to live. He was not only a respected resident of Nova Scotia but a great family man…” “When Ambrose Finson Church moved from Maine to Nova Scotia in 1865, he had a wife and one daughter, Alice …

Ambrose F. Church, Map-Maker More…

Tagged with: ,

“Across the harbour from Halifax were the settlements of Dartmouth and Preston, already economically dominated by the capital. Dartmouth had been settled in 1784 by twenty families from Nantucket. The men had been engaged in whaling, as had the men of Barrington, but the enterprise had suffered a financial disaster in 1792, and most of the original inhabitants had moved to Milford in South Wales. Preston had been settled in 1784 by Loyalists, disbanded soldiers, and freed Negro slaves. Only the Loyalists had remained. The Negroes were industrious, gaining a living by supplying butter, eggs, and poultry to Halifax, but …

The Geography of Haliburton’s Nova Scotia More…

Tagged with: , , ,