“East side of Bedford Basin The winding shore above the narrows has many picturesque points and coves to recommend it to the lover of natural scenery. It has also historical associations, but not, perhaps, of such prominence as that of the western side. High hills, clad with pine and spruce, rise conspicuously above the sparkling waters, affording wide views of the city and harbor of Halifax. Tuft’s Cove, which was named after Gerisham Tufts, who belonged to a family extensively known in the United States, was the first to obtain a grant of the land surrounding this cove. The impression …

Footprints Around and About Bedford Basin More…

On moving the eleventh resolution, on the 3rd of March (1837), Mr. Howe made a speech that is worth preserving, for various reasons. Those who defended the old system of government assumed, first, that the institutions of the United States had failed to secure liberty and happiness, and that by yielding responsible government, republican institutions would be at once introduced. Mr. Howe combated both these arguments. While he did justice to our neighbours, and ascribed to the practical working of their purely elective institutions the great prosperity and freedom which they enjoyed, he showed that responsible government was not republicanism, …

Speech on Elective Councils (Senate) More…

“When Halifax was first settled, this side of the harbor was the home and hunting ground of the [Mi’kmaq people]. Soon after the settlement of Halifax, Major Gillman built a saw mill in Dartmouth Cove on the stream flowing from the Dartmouth lakes. On September 30th 1749, the [Indigenous people] attacked and killed four and captured one out of six unarmed men who were cutting wood near Gillman’s mill. In August 1750, the Alderney, of 504 tons, arrived at Halifax with 353 immigrants, a town was laid out on the eastern side of the harbor in the autumn, given the …

The story of Christ Church, Dartmouth More…

“Township of Dartmouth Opposite the Town of Halifax, the Town called Dartmouth was laid out in the Year 1749; but in the war of 1756, the [Indigenous people] collected in great force on the basin of Minas, ascended the Shubenacadie in their canoes, and in the night surprised the guard, and killed, scalped, or carried away the most of the settlers; from which period the settlement went to decline, and was almost derelict until the year 1784, when a number of families were encouraged to settle there from Nantucket, to carry on the whale fishery. The town was then laid …

Instructions under the direction of the Secretary of State for the Colonial Department More…

“Dartmouth – A flourishing and beautiful village, opposite Halifax, at the head of the harbor, township of Dartmouth, county of Halifax. A steam ferry plies between here and the city. Dartmouth boasts of many fine buildings, contains several large foundries, three steam tanneries, employing a large number of men, and the residences of a number of merchants and others doing business in the city. The Provincial Lunatic asylum is half a mile from the village. Dartmouth is the proposed terminus of the Intercolonial railway. Montague Gold mines about 4 miles in the interior are being worked with great activity; according …

Lovell’s Province of Nova Scotia directory for 1871 More…

“The total number of [Black] slaves brought into Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island from the revolted colonies previous to the summer of 1784 may be estimated with some approach to certainty. Under instructions from Sir Guy Carleton, Colonel Morse, commanding Royal Engineer, made a tour of the Provincial settlements in the autumn of 1783 and early part of the summer of 1784, and to his report appended a “return of the disbanded troops and Loyalists settling in Nova Scotia,” for the purpose of ascertaining the number entitled to the “Royal Bounty of Provisions.” In the column allotted …

The slave in Canada (1899) More…

“The annals of Dartmouth and its sister townships contain several tales of a by-gone era, whose recital has often brought tears to humble eyes and which may yet have a charm for a more general and critical audience.” Lawson, William Mrs. “History of the townships of Dartmouth, Preston and Lawrencetown, Halifax county, N.S. : (Akins historical prize essay)” Halifax, N.S. : Morton, 1893. https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.09015/3?r=0&s=1

“Medals are awarded to Messrs. P. McNab, of Dartmouth, and H.M. Moyle, “for cereals of excellent quality.” It may appear singular that both should have a similar award for apparently similar products. It is to be understood that the two cases are not altogether parallel. Both exhibited wheat, barley, and oats – so that both were exhibitors of Cereals, – but McNab’s wheat was the best, while Moyle’s oats were the best…” Nova Scotia Committee for the Dublin International Exhibition. “Report of the Nova Scotia Department of the Dublin International Exhibition, 1865”, Halifax, N.S. : A. Grant, 1866. https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.40353/1?r=0&s=1

“In November and December of the year 1750 the following officers were appointed to the Dartmouth militia… Robert Campbell, to be Captain Jos. Scott, Thos. Burke, Thos. Leake, Josiah Rogerson, to be Lieutenants” Edwards, Joseph Plimsoll. “The militia of Nova Scotia, 1749-1867”, 1911 https://www.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.78682/1?r=0&s=1