An incredibly detailed map with a lot of text, again showing Chibouctou on the Dartmouth side, along with some crops. Perhaps this is the “1/2 acre of improved land” that de Gargas noted in his 1687-1688 census of Acadie (including Chibouctou). “Carte de la coste de l’Acadie” La Borde, Jean-Benjamin de. 17?? https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b53089980h

Executive Officers:President: Hon. Joseph HoweVice Presidents: W.J. Stairs, Esq., Patrick Power, Esq.Secretaries: Mr William Garvie,Robt. L. Weatherbee Esq.,Treasurer: Robt. Boak, Jr, Esq. The Maritime Provinces of British America now enjoy all the blessings of self-government, controlling their own revenues, forming, controlling and removing their own Cabinets ; appointing their own Judges, Councillors, and Public Officers; regulating her own Trade, training their own Militia, and discharging all the duties of loyal British Subjects in due subordination and steadfast allegiance to the Crown. The people of these Provinces have lived in harmony with each other —have no disputes with neighboring Slates— no controversies with the Mother Country, have ever been prone to mutual sympathy and protection, and are ready to uphold the honor 6f the national flag, and the integrity …

League of the Maritime Provinces Read More…

More time is spent describing Dartmouth here than in many other similar books of its kind, yet another instance of 1756 being given as the date of Dartmouth’s “destruction” at the hands of the Mi’kmaq. The timing of the “attack”, 1756, in regards to the delay of the institution of representative government at Halifax until 1758; the requirement of a population of 25 qualified electors in 1757 in order to qualify for a representative in the legislature, which become 50 qualified electors by 1758; all these points, when put together, have always struck me as curious. Earlier events, such as the arrival and settlement of various “wastrels” as well as the “King’s bad bargains” has led me to question whether it was the Mi’kmaq who were involved in …

A Plan of National Colonization Read More…

DARTMOUTH, Halifax County: This city is located on the east side of Halifax Harbour. A [Mi’kmaq] name was Boonamoogwaddy, “Tomcod ground.” The English name may have been given in honor of William Legge, Earl of Dartmouth, Colonial Secretary 1772-75, but it was probably named for the Devonshire port of Dartmouth. In August, 1750, the Alderney arrived in Halifax (Chebucto) Harbour with 353 settlers on board. On August 23 the Council resolved to settle them across the Harbour from Halifax. Before the end of 1750, a blockhouse and small military post had been built. In 1751 the settlers suffered from an [Indigenous] attack. After the American Revolution an oil factory was set up and operated by a Nantucket Whaling Company about 1785 to 1792. They built a meeting-house about …

Place Names and Places of Nova Scotia (in Dartmouth Township) Read More…

“THE AUTHOR’S APOLOGY: This little messenger, presented to the public, is a collection of information gained from many of the oldest members of the Churches in the Association, where records were imperfectly kept, and, in many instances, none whatever. I am aware that every person who attempts a work of this kind is left open for public comment or criticism. And as I make not the faintest attempt to literary attainments, I must claim your sympathy. My simple aim is to place in the hands of every [Black] Baptist in Nova Scotia a copy of this little book, in order if possible to give them some idea of how it came about that there should be a Church built by one who had so shortly escaped from the …

A brief history of the [Black] Baptists of Nova Scotia and their first organization as churches Read More…

Dartmouth: 1478 Males, 1668 Females, Total population 3,155. Number of families 559, 492 Married, 1057 Single, 119 Widows. Deaf: M: 2, Blind: M: 2, F: 1. Cannot Read Above 15 years of Age: M: 214, F: 246 Cannot Write Above 15 years of Age: M: 228, F: 287 [Black] persons included in population: 197 [Indigenous people] not included in population: 34 By Origin: Dartmouth: Total Population: 3155, “Natives”: 2628, England: 107, Wales: 2, Scotland: 78, Ireland: 205, Guernsey: 1, Jersey: 4, Canada: 13, New Brunswick: 29, Newfoundland: 18, Prince Edward Island: 2, West Indies: 10, United States of America: 45, France: 1, Italy: 1, Other peoples in the Mediterranean: 7, Germany: 2, East Indies: 1, All other places: 1. By Religion: Church of England: 1115, Church of Rome: …

Census, Township of Dartmouth, 1861 Read More…

Dartmouth Township: Numbers in each family: 19 men, 7 boys, 1 [Black] man, 11 women, 1 girl. Total persons in the township: 39. Religion: 30 Protestant, 9 Roman Catholic. Country: 13 English, 9 Irish, 8 Americans, 9 German & other foreigners. Stock and Substance: 14 horses, 1 Oxen & bulls, 6 cows, 2 young neat cattle, 4 swine. Produce of the last year: 40 bushels of oats. Alteration of inhabitants since last year: 2 males, 3 females, 5 total born in the past year. 1 male died. 1 male, 1 female arrived. “A General Return of the several Townships in the Province of Nova Scotia the first day of January 1767” https://archives.novascotia.ca/census/RG1v443/returns/?ID=1

“If the prophet had spent the forenoon in walking the streets of this town counting the liquor shops, and the afternoon in the Town Hall reading the names on the license petitions, he could not have described the traffic, and the part which the better thinking portion of our citizens take in it, in more fitting words than those of the text, “Who justify the wicked for reward.”” “There are eight men in this town selling by license, for which they pay fifty dollars each, this giving to the revenue $400. But now, on the other hand, what does it cost the town of Dartmouth to support the traffic? 1. Pauper’s bill $1,200; 2. To supporting County Prisons, $500; Salary of a second policeman, $500; Low estimate of …

The evils of the liquor traffic, and our responsibility in reference thereto, a sermon preached in the Dartmouth Baptist Church on Sabbath evening, Oct. 29th 1882 Read More…

“To the law and to the testimony; if they speak not according to this word, it is because there is no light in them” Falconer, Alexander, 1837?-1911. Universalism Antiscriptural: a Sermon, Preached In St. James Church, Dartmouth, On Sabbath, March 14, 1875. [Halifax, N.S.?: s.n.], 1875. https://hdl.handle.net/2027/aeu.ark:/13960/t6tx3pj37

“The [Indigenous people] had appeared in the neighborhood of the town for several weeks, but intelligence had been received that they had commenced hostilities, by the capture of twenty persons at Canso… On the last day of September they made an attack on the sawmill at Dartmouth, then under the charge of Major Gilman. Six of his men had been sent out to cut wood without arms. The [Indigenous people] laid in ambush, killed four and carried off one, and the other escaped and gave the alarm, and a detachment of rangers was sent after the [Indigenous people], who having overtaken them, cut off the heads of two [Indigenous people] and scalped one. (This affair is mentioned in a letter from a gentleman in Halifax to Boston, dated …

History of Halifax City Read More…

“The territorial distribution of the Nova Scotia government is – 1. Eastern division, 2. Middle; 3. Western; 4. Halifax; 5. Cape Breton; there are ten counties, some of which are again subdivided into districts and townships for the more convenient administration of justice. The only counties divided into districts are, Halifax into three, viz. Halifax, Colchester, and Pictou; and Sydney into Lower and Upper. The townships are not all of equal extent, nor of equal number in each county, viz. in Halifax there are Halifax, Dartmouth, Preston, and Lawrence Town (in Halifax District)…” “Halifax division, containing part of the county of the same name, and the townships of Haliax, Dartmouth, Preston and Lawrence Town, is thus presented in the last census: “The naval capital of British North America, …

History of Nova Scotia, Cape Breton, the Sable Islands, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, the Bermudas, Newfoundland, &c., &c. Read More…

“As I said before, to make the festivities complete, in the afternoon there was a procession to lay the corner-stone of a Lunatic Asylum. But oh! how the jolly old rain poured down upon the luckless pilgrimage! There were the “Virgins” of Masonic Lodge No. -, the Army Masons, in scarlet; the African Masons, in ivory and black; the Scotch-piper Mason, with his legs in enormous plaid trowsers, defiant of Shakspeare’s theory about the sensitiveness of some men, when the bag-pipe sings i’ the nose; the Clerical Mason in shovel hat; the municipal artillery; the Sons of Temperance, and the band. Away they marched, with drum and banner, key and compasses, BIBLE and sword, to Dartmouth, in great feather, for the eyes of Halifax were upon them.” “Is …

Acadia, or, A month with blue noses Read More…

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