“However, our chief interest in this matter lies not in the practical actions of statesmen but rather in the editorial opinion on this subject as expressed by the Halifax newspapers. Of these the Acadian Recorder was one of the first and most persistent champions of inter-provincial consolidation.” “By 1864 the question of B. N. A. Union had not yet become a strong political issue between parties. Both Liberal and Conservative party organs favored the scheme in principle, realizing that it was “pregnant with weal and woe to the people of British America.” As to the difficulties involved in the achievement …

The Halifax Press and B.N.A. Union 1856-1864 More…

“It now rested with Nova Scotia to give her decision. When Mr. Tilley’s government were first defeated at the polls, it seemed to Dr. Tupper, the Nova Scotian premier, impolitic and unnecessary to press the question in the sister province. Now, however, that New Brunswick had accepted the principle of union, it became incumbent on Nova Scotia to deal with the matter. For reasons which, no doubt, were in his opinion sufficient, Dr. Tupper decided and Sir Fenwick Williams, the lieut.-governor, acquiesced in the decision-that no dissolution should take place, but that the existing House of Assembly should be asked …

Political Experiences in Nova Scotia, 1867-1869 More…

“…in the Maritimes Confederation was the remedy for no particular evils, and it was an issue to be decided on its merits. It promised practical benefits of course, but it offered few practical solutions for Maritime problems. Confederation raised new problems: it did not solve old ones. In Nova Scotia these new problems erupted quite suddenly in public debate in August, 1864, with the first appearance of the Canadian visitors. The debate thus begun filled the pages of the newspapers. In Halifax four of the major newspapers carried an editorial on Confederation in virtually every issue from that time on …

Halifax Newspapers and the Federal Principle, 1864-1865 More…

THE HON. JUDGE PATTERSON “UNDER the above title Mr. Laurence J. Burpee has edited and published a series of letters written by Howe while in England in 1866-7, opposing the passage of the British North America Act, to William J. Stairs, one of the Vice Presidents of the League. Howe was himself the President, and its Constitution which Mr. Burpee gives in an Appendix is unmistakably his work. In expressing his thought in crisp sentences, where every word tells, there was in Nova Scotia no one aut similis aut secundus to the great Tribune.” “True to its claim to represent …

Joseph Howe and the Anti-Confederation League More…

“In Nova Scotia only the clever political footwork of Charles Tupper kept his province from vetoing the plan. But as soon as the new Dominion was formed Nova Scotians expressed themselves in no uncertain terms. Of 18 men elected to the House of Commons in Ottawa all but one, Tupper himself, were pledged to break away from what Joseph Howe called the “Botheration” Scheme. In a provincial election 35 of 37 elected members were anti-Confederationist.” “And while secession never found such an organized voice as in Nova Scotia where elections were won on it, it is still a word which …

The Cradle of Confederation: Some Reflections More…

“It will be remembered that while the Canadian parliament adopted, by large majorities in both Houses, the scheme of Confederation agreed upon by the delegates from the several provinces at the Quebec Conference, the parliament of Prince Edward Island rejected it; and the people in New Brunswick, to whom it was submitted by the Government of that province, by an enormous majority voted against it. Without New Brunswick the proposed union was for Nova Scotia impossible.” “What would the Legislature of Nova Scotia do during the session of 1866, now that New Brunswick’s position had changed? It was notorious that …

An Unexpected Incident of Confederation in Nova Scotia More…

“Since the early 1800s, Nova Scotia has also had a black minority of 3-4% of the population, a racially distinguishable “lumpenproletariat” frequently physically segregated from white society. Although sociological studies have suggested that black marginalization and disunity are purely “cultural,” the history of Africville and the peculiar spatial development of Halifax and Dartmouth calls attention to race as an instrument of “class war” (Clainnont).” Epprecht, Marc “Atlantic Canada and ‘the End of History”: Postmodernism and Regional Underdevelopment” Dalhousie Review, Volume 70, Number 4, 1991 https://dalspace.library.dal.ca/bitstream/handle/10222/61102/dalrev_vol70_iss4_pp429_458.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

“In 1822 public subscription libraries had been opened in Yarmouth and Pictou, preceding by only twelve years those literary and scientific societies which were established in both places in 1834. In 1824, the Halifax Public Library appeared; and in 1831 the Mechanics’ Library and Institute. The first lecture in the Institute was given in January, 1832; and, during the next quarter of a century, every phase of literature and science was discussed in this institute, which might well have been called the University of Halifax. From the parent organization branches spread to Dartmouth, Upper Stewiacke and Truro.” “Rather, it seems …

The Intellectual Awakening of Nova Scotia More…

“Skating was a favorite pastime with young and old, rich and poor. Besides Chocolate Lake, the Dartmouth Lakes, the Arm, and Bedford Basin there were many ponds near the city, most of which have vanished-Steele’s and the Quarry Ponds at Point Pleasant, the Egg Pond on the Common, two at Fort Needham and on the Rockhead property, and Stanford’s Ponds near James Stanford’s Tannery, and Bone Mill at Three Mile House, now Fairview. Prisoners were sent from Rockhead to clear snow from Griffin’s Pond, where it was the ambition of every boy to strap on the skates of some girl …

Halifax at the Time of Confederation More…

“The Mechanics’ Institute was organized in Halifax in 1832, and during the next three decades was a real university of the people for the city of Halifax, from which the idea spread to Dartmouth, Windsor, Truro, Stewiacke, Antigonish, Sydney and other places in Nova Scotia, as well as to Charlottetown, Saint John and Fredericton. In this institute weekly lectures were given during the winter months on literary and scientific subjects; and before it some of the most inspiring addresses of Joseph Howe were given. It was as President of the Institute, in 1834, that he gave that address on love …

Archives and Historical Research in the Maritimes More…