Key to Canada’s modern day ability to perform coup after coup masquerading as legal and constitutional behavior is the “disappearance” of Provincial constitutions, which doesn’t seem to have been accidental, and has enabled a constant and ever worsening tyranny predicated on revisionist history at every level of government. Along with the “unique qualities” of the notwithstanding clause in comparison to other Western constitutions and the “unique qualities” of provincial unicameral ram-fest legislatures are the “unique qualities” of a federalism bereft of sub-national constitutions, which would typically help provide a check on federal omnipotence, part and parcel of Federalism in free …

Provincializing Constitutions: History, Narrative, and the Disappearance of Canada’s Provincial Constitutions More…

“In the Royal Charter granted in 1621 to Sir William Alexander lies the origin of Nova Scotia as a Province and of the name it bears. It is with the conditions leading up to this grant and consequent upon it, as well as with the Charter itself, that the present article is concerned.” “The grant was to Sir William, his heirs, and assigns, or “to any other that will join with him in the whole or in any part thereof,” to be held of the crown as part of Scotland. The royal warrant was signed by the King at Windsor …

Nova Scotia’s Charter More…

Since this is posted to the internet, and it has been indexed by Google, it is a little late to prevent circulation as requested at the beginning of the document. Definitely worth a read if you’d like to gain a greater understanding about this oft-neglected part of early Nova Scotian history. Reid, John G. “The Lost Colony of New Scotland and its Successors, to 1670” Saint Mary’s University Conference, March 26-27, 2004, http://www.mceas.org/Reid.pdf

“I have also thought it due to the pioneers in the religious development of Nova Scotia to give a brief sketch of the establishment of the five great denominations, the Roman Catholics, Presbyterians, Baptists, Church of England and Methodists – who comprise in their membership nearly all the population of the province, where the Church has always exercised a powerful influence on the social and moral conditions of a country where the Puritan and English element of New England has, in the course of over a century, intermingled with English, Scotch and Irish and given birth to the “Nova Scotian.”” …

Builders of Nova Scotia More…

“The total number of [Black] slaves brought into Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island from the revolted colonies previous to the summer of 1784 may be estimated with some approach to certainty. Under instructions from Sir Guy Carleton, Colonel Morse, commanding Royal Engineer, made a tour of the Provincial settlements in the autumn of 1783 and early part of the summer of 1784, and to his report appended a “return of the disbanded troops and Loyalists settling in Nova Scotia,” for the purpose of ascertaining the number entitled to the “Royal Bounty of Provisions.” In the column allotted …

The slave in Canada (1899) More…

Considering that most of the literature on the eugenics movement downplays or ignores its history in Nova Scotia, this amazing dissertation is proof one can’t always rely on what little is initially apparent in order to guide the search for facts, especially in regards to Nova Scotia. Never let an initial apparent lack of data discourage your efforts. If you’ve been a member of the “lower classes” in Nova Scotia you too may feel a kind of familiarity with the ways in which eugenics aims were pursued in your life, especially when it comes to experiences and interactions with teachers, …

Institutionalizing Eugenics: Custody, Class, Gender And Education In Nova Scotia’s Response To The “Feeble-Minded”, 1890-1931 More…

“That slavery existed in Canada before its conquest by Britain in 1759-60, there can be no doubt, although curiously enough it has been denied by some historians and essayists. The first [Black] slave of which any account is given was brought to Quebec by the English in 1628. He was a young man from Madagascar and was sold in Quebec for 50 half crowns. Sixty years thereafter in 1688, Denonville, the Governor and DeChampigny, the Intendant of New France, wrote to the French Secretary of State, complaining of the dearness and scarcity of labor, agricultural and domestic, and suggesting that …

The slave in Canada (1920) More…

“The Ku Klux Klan movement in New Brunswick in the 1920s and 1930s was part of a wave of anti-Catholicism in the Northeast. The supposedly American organization’s connections with local Protestants, such as the Orange Order and Conservative politicians, coupled with New Brunswick’s long history of anti-Catholicism, indicate that the Klan’s nativism was not foreign to the province. Instead, it was part of a region-wide response to a thriving Catholic population that challenged the Protestant, anglophone milieu. The Klan’s transnational “Patriotic-Protestantism” rejected bilingualism and Catholic participation in the political sphere while promoting traditional Anglo-Saxon values and Protestant morality.” “As an …

“A Clarion Call To Real Patriots The World Over”: The Curious Case of the Ku Klux Klan of Kanada in New Brunswick during the 1920s and 1930s More…

“A list of the families in part of Nova Scotia, dated Halifax, July, 1752, states that there were within the town of Dartmouth: 53 families, 81 males above sixteen, 47 females above 16, 29 males under 16, 38 females under 16; total 193.” (Selections from the Public Documents of N.S., p 670)

“The principle of organization of government on the basis of “separate” departments is not only fundamental in the structure of American Federal government, but it has been written into every one of our state constitutions in one form or another. That purpose was stated in Article XXX of the Declaration of Rights of the Massachusetts Constitution to be the achievement of “a government of laws, and not of men.” In another article the same purpose was stated more fully in the following words: “Government is instituted for the common good;—and not for the profit, honor, or private interest of any …

Plural office-holding in Massachusetts, 1760-1780, its relation to the “separation” of departments of government More…